Search results for peter singer

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Peter Singer Drops “Eternal You”

Peter Singer ditches the usual dance floor euphoria for a more introspective trip with his latest release, “Eternal You.” The track starts with a sense of impending doom. A pulsating bassline throbs like a heartbeat under a melody that coils with tension. The lyrics paint a picture of unease: “The floor beneath feels like it’s shaking / Heart in throat the only sound.” Peter throws out existential questions like confetti: “The coming darkness, and what of hate?”

There’s a cynical edge to the track. Lines like “Illuminate this caliphate” hint at a world consumed by conflict, where easy answers are hard to find. The chorus pulsates with a dark energy: “Yes, it’s a long hard journey, cautious moves / And every small decision leads to eternal you.” Each choice we make shapes who we become, our “eternal selves,” but the path is shrouded in uncertainty.

Eternal You” doesn’t shy away from doubt. “Accepting the old gospel yet still lacking proof,” Singer sings, highlighting the struggle for meaning in a world where faith and reason clash. The driving rhythm underscores this relentless pursuit of answers: “Forever, always learning. Everything we do / Each plan, each undertaking… eternity, eternity teaches you.”

This isn’t your typical party anthem. It’s a meditation on the dance floor, a reminder that even amidst the flashing lights and throbbing bass, we all grapple with the vastness of existence. “Eternal You” is a bold departure for Peter, a track that lingers long after the last beat fades, urging us to contemplate the choices that shape our eternal selves.


Dive into “Eternal You” by Peter Singer here:

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Peter KingKing: From Rhythm to Soul – A Fusion of Music and Business Brews Sweet Melodies

Los Angeles-born singer-songwriter Peter KingKing defies easy categorization. He's a multi-faceted talent who blends musical passion with sharp business acumen. While managing car dealerships across the country, KingKing finds solace and artistic expression through his soulful music.

KingKing's love affair with music began in his youth. The melodies of the guitar and the rhythmic pulse of the drums became his haven. This early influence translates into his music today, where his lyrics paint vivid portraits of love, longing, and life's complexities with raw authenticity.

His music resonates deeply because it cuts through the noise and connects directly with the listener's core. "Sweeter Than," his latest release, exemplifies this artistic power. It's a captivating exploration of infatuation, weaving a narrative of love and yearning with the skill of a seasoned storyteller. The track's infectious beats and catchy hooks perfectly capture the universal experience of desiring something just out of reach.

https://open.spotify.com/track/5VDWrUHVAlT60oDFuzhOT6?si=28d7300935ae4340

"True (You) Pt. 1" and "True (You) Pt. 2" further solidify KingKing's artistic versatility. These soulful compositions lay bare the intricate experiences of love and heartbreak. He welcomes listeners into a world of unflinching honesty and vulnerability, where lyrics shift between passionate declarations of devotion and somber reflections on loss. It's a journey through his emotional landscape, a powerful illustration of his willingness to be transparent.

https://open.spotify.com/track/1cK6zd5YWkJFiUN0AHouB1?si=9ffbf0454b004eda

KingKing's music isn't just entertainment; it's a catalyst for self-discovery. Each melody and lyric peels back another layer, revealing the depths of human emotion and offering a glimpse into his soul. His infectious energy and heartfelt music continue to propel him forward, leaving a lasting impression on the music scene.

KingKing's "True (You)" is a powerful two-part story. The first track pulsates with the exhilaration of new love, while the second confronts the sobering reality of heartbreak. This intentional contrast allows listeners to connect with the full spectrum of a relationship, from the initial spark to the aftermath.

https://open.spotify.com/track/4Vd28hvSTePpmJ7LrqezRs?si=1d9fcdd791324889

What truly sets Peter KingKing apart is his vulnerability. He doesn't shy away from portraying the unfiltered emotions of love and loss. Through his music, he creates a space for listeners to not only be entertained but also to confront their own experiences with honesty and open-heartedness. This vulnerability is the key to his music resonating with such a wide audience seeking genuine connection in today's musical landscape.

KingKing's artistry extends beyond catchy melodies. He uses his music to forge authentic connections with his audience. By laying bare his vulnerabilities, desires, and struggles, he creates a space where listeners can connect with their own experiences. As Peter KingKing continues to navigate the world of music, his star is undoubtedly on the rise. His music leaves an indelible mark, a powerful reminder of the impact of honest storytelling and the unwavering pursuit of creative expression.

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Scottish singer signs record deal after viral ‘Complex’ TikTok hit

Scottish singer-songwriter Katie Gregson-MacLeod has signed to Columbia Records, after amassing 100,000 views on her 45-second TikTok clip. Watch the video of the heart-felt track, ‘Complex’ below.

  • READ MORE: Labels pushing artists to make TikToks: you’re spoiling the fun (and that’s not even the worst of it)

After posting ‘Complex’ to the app with the caption “here’s my saviour complex” on August 5, the singer woke up the next day to comments from Gracie Abrams, Lennon Stella, and Maisie Peters. Now, four weeks later, she’s officially making a record.

“I posted 45 seconds of the new song after writing it a couple of days before,” Gregson-MacLeod told BBC Radio Scotland. “I always post clips of new writing to see what happens and this one exceeded my wildest dreams.”

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She continued: “I woke up to absolute madness. It was early, I think 6 am and saw it had more than 100,000 views.”

The track is now on streaming platforms and has surpassed 3million listens on Spotify in under a week.

@katiegregsonmacleod

here’s my saviour complex song #fyp #originalsong #singersongwriter

♬ complex (demo) – Katie Gregson-MacLeod

 

In the slow-building piano ballad, she sings,“I’m wearing his boxers/I’m being a good wife/We won’t be together/But maybe the next life.”

‘Complex’ has continued to grow in views and draw the attention of major labels. At one point, meetings were set up between record labels and the singer, at the coffee shop where she worked. “They were on a table each,” she said. “Three record labels in my wee coffee shop. I thought ‘this is surreal’.”

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Gregson-MacLeod has decided to postpone her final year of history studies to focus on music, telling The Press and Journal, “This song has the potential of a long life, I want to give it its moment.”

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Peter Hook wants Ian Curtis statue after Aitch advertising row

Peter Hook has said there should be a permanent memorial to Ian Curtis in Manchester following the removal of a mural to the late Joy Division musician.

  • READ MORE: New Order talk suicide prevention in Parliament to mark anniversary of Ian Curtis’ death

Earlier this week, a advertisement for Manchester rapper Aitch was placed over a much loved mural of Curtis in the city’s Northern Quarter. Aitch said he would “fix” the issue saying he had no idea that the advertisement was being placed over the mural.

The mural, based on a photo of Curtis taken by Philippe Carly, was painted by Manchester street artist Akse P19. It debuted in 2020 in collaboration with music and mental health festival Headstock to raise awareness around mental health issues, and was supported by Manchester Council.

“I don’t just choose locations for billboards, this is the first time I’ve seen it myself. Getting fixed as we speak,” rapper Aitch said in response to the move.

In a separate tweet, Aitch added: “It’s come to light that the iconic Ian Curtis mural on Port Street has been painted over with my album artwork. This is the first time I’ve heard of this, me and my team are getting this fixed pronto. No way on earth would I want to disrespect a local hero like Ian.”

Now, Peter Hook, co-founder of Joy Division with Curtis, said the singer and late band manager Tony Wilson should be honoured with permanent memorials in the city.

“We have to bear in mind that it is an advertising site, it was paid for by Mental Health Day for a certain period,” Hook said in response to the news (via BBC).

“Business moves on and so it’s no wonder Aitch didn’t know about it as it was probably done by the company who looks after his advertising,” he continued. “I feel sorry for the guy because he was so hurt by the obvious reaction, it was a terrible situation for him.”

Speaking to BBC 5Live’s Colin Murray, Hook said he was there when the painting was finished by artist Aske P19 and said losing the mural was a “sad occurrence”.

The mural of Ian Curtis by Akse P19 in Manchester that has been painted over, Aitch
The mural of Ian Curtis by Akse P19 in Manchester that has been painted over, Aitch. Credit: Tony Smith/Alamy, Dave J Hogan/Getty Images

“I was there with him [Akse P19] as he was finishing off the portrait,” he said. “People were coming from all over the place to see it…One of Ian Curtis’s cousins came, who I hadn’t met, and it was amazing because I had to bring Aksie over and say to him ‘look at how you’ve caught him’, because the cousin had the same mannerisms and the intensity in his eyes, which was one of the wonderful things about Ian.

“That mural did stand for a lot… I wouldn’t have liked to have been the guy painting over Ian knowing that area of Manchester, it is just a sad occurrence. I suppose in a funny way maybe it will spur someone on to celebrate these people [Curtis and Wilson] in Manchester or Salford,” Hook added.

“I’ve been campaigning for years to put a statue off Tony Wilson in Manchester and Ian Curtis in Macclesfield,” he said, addressing the permanent memorial Macclesfield made to Curtis earlier this year – which Hook himself unveiled. 

Speaking about the idea of a statue in Manchester, Hook said: “Maybe I’ll push it… see if we can spur something on.”

Artist Aske P19 also addressed what happened to the mural in a post on social media.

“It had become a cultural landmark and meant so much to people from Manchester and beyond,” Akse P19 wrote in an Instagram post about the mural being painted over. “It doesn’t take much common sense to understand that this mural should have remained for what it represented and stood for.”

For help and advice on mental health:

  • CALM – The Campaign Against Living Miserably
  • Help Musicians UK – Around the clock mental health support and advice for musicians (CALL MUSIC MINDS MATTER ON: 0808 802 8008)
  • Music Support Org – Help and support for musicians struggling with alcoholism, addiction, or mental health issues (CALL: 0800 030 6789)
  • YOUNG MINDS – The voice for young people’s health and wellbeing
  • Time To Change – Let’s end mental health discrimination
  • The Samaritans – Confidential support 24 hours a day
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Watch Peter Crouch join Kasabian on stage at Isle of Wight Festival

Kasabian played Isle Of Wight Festival last night (June 18), and were joined on stage by Peter Crouch – see footage below.

The ex-England footballer is a huge, longtime fan of the Leicester band, and he joined them to dance on stage during a rendition of their hit single ‘Fire’.

The performance came after Blossoms had their set at the festival cut short earlier in the day due to adverse weather issues.

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The Stockport five-piece were forced to stop their set half way through due to high winds affecting equipment and stage rigging.

Watch Crouch join Kasabian on stage below:

Kasabian are set to release their forthcoming album ‘The Alchemist’s Euphoria‘ this year, and this month shared new song ‘Chemicals’ and announced new UK autumn/winter tour dates.

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‘Chemicals’ follows ‘ALYGATOR‘, and ‘SCRIPTVRE‘, which were shared last year and earlier this year respectively.

Guitarist and songwriter Serge Pizzorno, who took over on frontman duties after the band fired Tom Meighan for his domestic violence conviction two years ago, explained of the new track to NME: “We all make up this narrative of who we think we are.

“This is about ripping that up, going against all that and no longer going with your own madness. You need to go somewhere else and re-set everything.”

Meanwhile, Former frontman Tom Meighan has announced his first festival date since his sacking from the band last year.

Last summer, the Leicester band announced they had ordered Meighan to leave the group after it emerged that he had assaulted his partner, Vikki Ager.

Meighan pleaded guilty and was required to undertake 200 hours of unpaid work. The singer has since married Ager and relocated to Cornwall.

After a spate of headline gigs earlier this year, Meighan will headline the Looe! Live festival in Cornwall on the weekend of September 16-18.

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Peter Gabriel to release first new album in 20 years this year, according to drummer

Peter Gabriel is to release his first new album in 20 years this year, before touring it in 2023, according to his drummer.

The news comes after Gabriel told NME last month that he’s “got a lot of songs I’m trying to get finished” and is “hoping to have something out by the end of the year.”

  • READ MORE: Peter Gabriel on working with Arcade Fire and making touring greener

Speaking to L’Illustré in a new interview, Gabriel’s longtime drummer Manu Katché said the band are “finishing our new album” and will take it out on a world tour next year.

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Back in 2020, Gabriel also spoke of progress on new music, telling Uncut: “I’m excited by what is being cooked at the moment — I have been slowed down quite a lot by lockdown, we’ve not been able to have Dickie my engineer here — but I have enough songs that I like to make a record I’m proud of.”

Asked if an album would then be arriving soon, he responded: “It would depend on how you define ‘soon’, but the answer is yes!”

Peter Gabriel attends The Ivor Novello Awards 2022 at The Grosvenor House Hotel on May 19, 2022 in London, England. (Photo by Dave J Hogan/Dave J. Hogan/Getty Images)
Peter Gabriel attends The Ivor Novello Awards 2022 in London. CREDIT: Dave J. Hogan/Getty Images

Gabriel also recently contributed to Arcade Fire’s latest acclaimed album ‘WE‘, lending vocals to the song ‘Unconditional II (Race and Religion)’.

“I thought that they were a great band and they asked me,” Gabriel told NME about how the collaboration came about. “That’s the simple truth about it. Regine [Chassagne, keys] grew up in Montreal so was exposed to a lot of my music. They’re great writers and it was really fun and interesting to see how other people worked.”

The singer also stopped by London venue The O2 to watch his former band Genesis’ final show earlier this year.

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Peter Andre says Liam Gallagher apologised to him over past feud

Peter Andre has spoken of his past feud with Liam Gallagher, revealing that the former Oasis frontman later apologised for his behaviour.

Gallagher reportedly called the ‘Mysterious Girl singer a “c***” in 2007 after being asked during an interview who he would collaborate with, text or ignore out of Andre, Trevor McDonald and Dolly Parton.

  • READ MORE: The NME Big Read – Liam Gallagher: “I sound good. I look cool. I talk from the heart”

Writing in his latest OK! column, Andre said that he’d recently remembered his negative “encounter” with LG. “He once said some harsh things about me in an interview,” he wrote. “I took it on the chin, as I’d been told it’s his nature.”

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He continued: “A while later, I bumped into him and he not only apologised, but praised me for being a great father and for my relationship with my kids.

“I didn’t expect it! I knew about his ‘tough guy’ bravado, but we talked about our families. It was a bizarre encounter, but a good one.”

Andre responded to Gallagher’s comments in ’07, telling New! that same year: “I read somewhere that Liam Gallagher has been calling me all sorts of names.

“I found this quite surprising because when I last saw Liam he couldn’t have been friendlier to me and [ex-wife] Katie [Price]. I’d go as far as to say that he was totally up our backsides!

“We bumped into him at a Radio 1 event and he told us how great he thought we were and how his mother Peggy was a big fan.”

He added: “It’s such a shame he was too much of a coward to tell us how he really felt to our faces instead of being two-faced. That man is all mouth and no trousers!”

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Liam Gallagher recently hit out at U2, saying that the band “aren’t remotely rock ‘n’ roll”.

Gallagher is due to release his third solo studio album, ‘C’mon You Know’, on May 27 via Warner. He’s so far previewed the project with two singles, ‘Everything’s Electric’ and the record’s title track.

LG will showcase the upcoming album on a string of huge headline shows this summer, including a two-night billing at Knebworth. You can find the full schedule and buy any remaining tickets here.

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Joy Division’s Peter Hook unveils new Ian Curtis mural in Macclesfield town centre

Peter Hook helped unveil a new mural of Joy Division bandmate Ian Curtis in Macclesfield town centre this afternoon (March 26).

  • READ MORE: Soundtrack Of My Life: Peter Hook

The bassist and co-founder of New Order cut the ribbon alongside Akse, the Manchester-based street artist who painted the mural, telling those in attendance: “I am actually very honoured to be here, and to do this, because to me it’s about time Ian came home.”

The mural, funded by Cheshire East Council, is based on an original photograph taken by Kevin Cummins at The Factory/Russell Club in Hulme, Manchester on 13 July 1979. It adorns a building on Mill Street opposite Macclesfield bus station.

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Ahead of the unveiling, Curtis said earlier in the week: “I’m watching all the people going down the street and every single one of them is drawn to it.

“Some young kids walking down had no idea who he was but now they do. Hopefully they’ll listen to the music and get the gist of what we were trying to do as kids.”

Some of Akse’s other recent works include murals of the late British army officer and fundraiser Captain Tom Moore and Manchester United footballer Marcus Rashford.

He said it was an honour to paint the portrait of Curtis and hoped local people were excited about it.

“Although I’ve been working on murals most of my life, it’s still always an incredible feeling to get to the end of the journey – well the end of my journey at least,” Akse said. “Now it’s time for the people of Macclesfield to enjoy the mural, as I know how much Ian meant to so many of them.”

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Councillor Nick Mannion, chair of the authority’s economy and growth committee, said: “Before today, I spoke about how perhaps this beautiful mural has been somewhat overdue but now that I’m here seeing it for myself for the first time, I can say without any doubt that it has truly been worth the wait.

“I am a huge fan of Joy Division – the cultural significance of the band and Ian stretches well beyond my home town of Macclesfield. This is such a proud moment, I’m feeling very emotional about it right now.”

Curtis, who was brought up in the town and is buried in Macclesfield Cemetery, was the lead singer of Joy Division until his death in May 1980 at the age of 23.

Meanwhile, Hook recently discussed the Joy Division biopic Control in an Ask Me Anything session on Reddit, calling it “TOO accurate”.

The film was directed by Anton Corbijn, who worked closely with the band as a photographer, and was released in 2007.

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Delta 5 singer and guitarist Julz Sale has died

Julz Sale of Leeds post-punk band Delta 5 has died.

The singer and guitarist’s death was confirmed by record label Rough Trade, who released much of the band’s work in the UK, and where Sale was employed for some time following Delta 5’s breakup.

US label Kill Rock Stars, who released a compilation of early Delta 5 material titled ‘Singles & Sessions 1979-1981’ in 2006, also paid their respects to Sale on social media, writing that Sale’s “contribution to punk, post-punk and music at large will be felt forever”.

Emerging out of the same scene as the Mekons and Gang of Four, Sale co-founded Delta 5 alongside Ros Allen and Bethan Peters, both of whom played bass. They later added drummer Kelvin Knight and guitarist Alan Riggs and released a handful of singles and their sole album, 1981’s ‘See the Whirl’.

The group were best known for their debut single ‘Mind Your Own Business’, which endured long after their dissolution. The song has been covered by the likes of Chicks on Speed, R. Stevie Moore and Dum Dum Girls over the years.

‘Mind Your Own Business’ also featured in an episode of Netflix series Sex Education in 2019, and received renewed mainstream attention when it was used to soundtrack an Apple ad about privacy earlier this year, some four decades after it was first released.

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Girls Aloud singer Sarah Harding dies aged 39 following breast cancer battle

Sarah Harding has died aged 39 after being diagnosed with breast cancer, her family have confirmed.

The Girls Aloud star was diagnosed with breast cancer last year and shared the news with fans in August, at which point the disease had spread to other parts of her body.

The news was confirmed today (September 5) by Harding’s mother Marie in a post on Instagram.

“It’s with deep heartbreak that today I’m sharing the news that my beautiful daughter Sarah has sadly passed away,” she wrote.

“Many of you will know of Sarah’s battle with cancer and that she fought so strongly from her diagnosis until her last day.”

The post added: “She slipped away peacefully this morning. I’d like to thank everyone for their kind support over the past year. It meant the world to Sarah and it gave her great strength and comfort to know she was loved.

“I know she won’t want to be remembered for her fight against this terrible disease – she was a bright shining star and I hope that’s how she can be remembered instead.”

See the post below:

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Sarah Harding (@sarahnicoleharding)

Following the sad news of Harding’s death, tributes have begun to pour in from across the music and entertainment world.

Jedward wrote: “R.I.P. Pop Music Icon Sarah Harding! Strength and Love to her friends and family.”

Singer Michelle Gayle shared a photo of herself with Harding, writing: “Life turns so quickly. So sorry we didn’t get to have one last night out, dancing on top of tables, like you wanted.

“I love you. I will miss you. And I will keep all your legendary voice notes! There will never be another you. You will never be forgotten.”

Actress and singer Kym Marsh added: “I’m so very sorry to hear of the passing of Sarah Harding. What a beautiful girl and person she really was.

“I don’t claim to have known her very well but what I did know was how fun and kind she really was. My thoughts are with her family and friends at this time.”

“A sad day!” Alesha Dixon wrote on Twitter. “Such a shining star! Rest in peace beautiful Sarah.”

Music critic and former NME contributor Peter Robinson – aka Popjustice – added: “What terribly sad news about Sarah Harding. None of all that amazing music would have been the same without her spark.”

Oritsé Williams, singer-songwriter and former singer of JLS, also paid tribute to Harding, writing: “Heartbreaking to hear that Sarah Harding from Girls Aloud has just passed away after a long battle with cancer.
“The times we met she was always so bubbly, such a big beautiful personality. My sincerest sympathies and heart goes out to Sarah’s friends, family & band members.”

See more tributes below:

Harding previously shared an update on her cancer diagnosis in early December. “I can’t deny that things are tough right now but I’m fighting as hard as I possibly can and being as brave as I know how,” she wrote in a post on Instagram.

Back in March, she revealed that she was told by doctors that Christmas 2020 “would probably be my last” as she continued to receive treatment for cancer.

The star joined Girls Aloud during their initial creation on the reality show Popstars: The Rivals in 2002 and continued to perform with them until they broke up in 2013.

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Maisie Peters Wants You To Know What She’s Thinking

By Gabriel Aikins

It takes a special collection of qualities for an artist to amass their stans. The music obviously has to be great, but it requires more: a business mind able to navigate the industry, a voice and the knowledge of how to use it, and perhaps most importantly, a willingness to give generously from their own life and experiences. Maisie Peters, the 21-year old British songwriter who has already captured the attention of both adoring fans and icons like Taylor Swift and Ed Sheeran, checks all those boxes. As she nears the release of her debut album You Signed Up For This, on August 27, Peters is leading the next generation of stan-worthy stars.

Although You Signed Up For This may be her debut, Peters has already spent years honing her sound. “I've been co-writing since I was 15, I've been writing since I was 12,” she explains. EPs Dressed Too Nice for a Jacket and It’s Your Bed Babe, It’s Your Funeral — released in 2018 and 2019 respectively — established her delightful combination of danceable production and singer-songwriter sensibility, furthered by catchy recent tracks like the upbeat “Psycho” and wistful “John Hughes Movie.” At the same time, her inclusion on soundtracks like Birds of Prey brought her to the cultural forefront.

A dedication to being completely herself reflects in the wide range of sonic elements Peters employs on YSUFT. Tracks like “Psycho” rely on synth-heavy dance-pop production to provide energy and fun, while others like “Volcano” slow down and showcase a more intimate feel. “I want it to encapsulate everything that I love and everything that I've been making, and obviously I'm rooted in singer-songwriter, acoustic sort of folk-pop, but I also grew up on ABBA and Taylor [Swift] and Britney [Spears] and all of these people. I wanted that in there as well,” she says. (Peters is a massive Swiftie. She’s briefly distracted during the conversation by friends and fans flooding her phone with the news that Swift is teasing the re-recorded Red tracklist.)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UpNPyxskt6k

Swift has made it known she’s a fan of Peters, too, tweeting praise for a recreation of the “Exile” video Peters and fellow artist Griff made in December 2020. Additionally, YSUFT is releasing through Sheeran’s record label Gingerbread Man, adding another layer of incredulity for the young artist. “It's very surreal. Obviously, I grew up on Ed’s and Taylor’s music, and Taylor's my all-time idol. And Ed is obviously a huge part of the music that I make and the reason why I make it. So it's been really cool working with Ed and getting to know him as a friend and a mentor,” she says.

A key facet of Peters’s music, like her idol’s, is the clarity with which she captures her feelings as she went from being a teenager into her twenties and adulthood. From bothersome exes to wistful memories of friends, YSUFT is the story of her life. "It's such a cool way of keeping a log of how you felt, how you sounded, and what you wanted to present to the world,” she says, rattling off different ages and time periods of when each song was created. It was writing daily that helped her find her voice. “There's so much that you can't learn unless you just do it every day for six years and unless you go into those rooms and write a song, and then write a song, and then write a song,” she says, repeating for emphasis. She’s been dreaming of making this album as she’s grown up, and getting to finally do it is “really special.”

The bones of YSUFT formed around July 2020, by Peters’s estimation. “There are a couple songs on the album from before then, but I think that summer is when it really started taking form and I was really focusing on the fact that I was making the album,” she explains. With around 70 percent of the tracklist locked in, most songs only needed the last layers of production to be done, but Peters did tinker. “I re-sang a lot of stuff. I think it's crazy how much your voice changes even in six months,” she says, indicating that she wanted the final product to sound as close to the person she is right now as possible.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Eg8em_VHt4

Peters does not take for granted that many of her fans are her age and will connect personally with her music. Everything on the album is something that she herself or one of her friends has been through in real life, which gives each of her songs an ever-important ring of truth.  “Any other teenage, early-twenties girl can find them and listen to them and think, ‘Wow, that's me.’” She’s quick to give praise to her peers in the new generation of young female musicians, too, ranging from Griff to Holly Humberstone, as well as acknowledging that she’s building on the work of the women who came before her, citing Swift and Lily Allen among others.

Peters will happily tell anyone what she’s thinking as well. The same gregarious, fun-loving personality shines across her social media accounts to her 206,000 Instagram followers. Recently, she’s teased easter eggs of songs and album covers (as of early August, she says there are some fans still haven’t found) and leaned hard into the term “feral girl summer,” which, in her own words, means “I'm living the best life regardless of the consequences, arguably, maybe?” Laughing, she says, “It's just really natural for me to sort of be an idiot.”

Even more than fun memes and feral girl summer, Peters is excited to share the spiritual ownership of YSUFT once it’s released. “I always say a song is mine for as long as I have it, but then I release it and it really becomes everybody else’s. It's actually less mine and more yours once it's in the wild,” she says. She loves seeing people sing her songs online and is proud of the community and “album friends” that spring up from around her music. There’s no central message she wants taken away from listening to the album, and she encourages every listener to draw their own meanings and feelings. “I would love anything, anything that anyone takes away from it is more than enough,” she says. “The idea that this album and the songs can be part of people's lives, it’s so cool and special and wild that I would love that.”

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Peter Capaldi to release debut solo album

Peter Capaldi has been working on his debut solo album during the coronavirus lockdowns.

  • READ MORE: ‘The Suicide Squad’ movie: release date, plot details, cast and everything we know so far

The former Doctor Who actor began work on a collection of songs after filming ceased during the pandemic.

Capaldi was formerly the lead singer and guitarist of a punk rock band called The Dreamboys in the 1980s. Comic Craig Ferguson also featured in the band.

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“When the lockdown struck, it felt like the perfect opportunity to get his head down and work on a full project of his own,” a source told The Sun.

“Peter has been a huge music fan for years and was doing that before his acting career properly took off. That stopped him from singing and making music for a while but in recent years he has got back into it and put some music out just for the joy of it.”

The source confirmed that the album is currently in the mixing stage and that the album will released in the near future.

Lewis Capaldi
Lewis Capaldi. CREDIT: Burak Cingi/Redferns

The actor is distantly related to Lewis Capaldi. After meeting the singer-songwriter for the first time in 2018, the actor went on to star in the music video for ‘Someone You Loved’.

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Peter is set to appear on the big screen next in DC blockbuster The Suicide Squad. The actor will play super-intelligent villain The Thinker in James Gunn’s latest take on the franchise. He stars opposite Margot Robbie, Idris Elba, John Cena and Pete Davidson.

The Suicide Squad is released in UK cinemas on July 30.

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Watch Tinted Windows reunite in honour of late bandmate Adam Schlesinger

The remaining members of supergroup Tinted Windows reunited to perform a tribute to their late bandmate Adam Schlesinger on Wednesday (May 5).

  • READ MORE: From Fountains of Wayne to ‘My Crazy Ex-Girlfriend’: Adam Schlesinger’s 10 best songs

The Fountains Of Wayne songwriter was one quarter of the group during their existence between 2009 and 2010, which also included Hanson’s Taylor Hanson on vocals, The Smashing Pumpkins’ James Iha on guitar and Cheap Trick’s Bun E. Carlos on drums.

You can see footage of the performance of their track ‘Back With You’ below, from the band’s 2009 self-titled album, their only full-length release.

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The performance was part of a benefit organised by Shlesinger’s Fountains Of Wayne bandmate Jody Porter, in honour of the late musician and in aid of MusiCares, which provides relief for those in the music industry affected by coronavirus, as well as currently-closed New York venue Bowery Electric.

Other performers included R.E.M.‘s Peter Buck, Courtney Love, Patrick Carney of The Black Keys, Mickey Dolenz of The Monkees, Sean Ono Lennon, and Chris Carrabba of Dashboard Confessional.

Schlesinger died aged 52 following complications related to COVID-19 in April 2020, after being hospitalised with the virus.

Tom Hanks, Stephen King, Dashboard Confessional and more paid tribute to the singer-songwriter following the news.

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In an emotional tribute, his girlfriend Alexis Morley recalled their final days together: “We spent such a sweet week together, our roles kind of reversed because usually Adam was the one to take care of me.”

The remaining members of Fountains Of Wayne teamed up with Sharon Van Etten for a number of different benefit performances in the weeks following Schlesinger’s death.

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Send us your questions for Peter Murphy

It didn’t take long for Peter Murphy to make an impression. Three minutes into Bauhaus’s first ever studio session, the former bookbinder’s apprentice from Northampton stepped up to the mic and began singing about velvet-lined coffins and virginal brides with such conviction that their first-take recording of “Bela Lugosi’s Dead” remained on the indie charts for two years.

In that time, Bauhaus managed to stake out a whole new musical territory. Murphy understandably bristles at the ‘Godfather Of Goth’ epithet, given that his wide-ranging solo career has taken in everything from violin-driven alt.rock (on massive US radio hit “Cuts You Up”) to experimental fourth-world pop (2002’s Dust). But any singer who’s ever blackened their wardrobe and whitened their face to sing about matters of the heart in extravagant metaphor owes something to Peter Murphy.

Having reformed Bauhaus for three dates at the Hollywood Palladium in late 2019 (and with a show at Alexandra Palace to come in October), Murphy is currently overseeing the reissue of his five Beggars Banquet solo albums, spanning 1985’s Should The World Fail To Fall Apart to 1995’s Peter Gabriel-produced Cascade, along with a compilation of rarities from that period.

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Furthermore, he’s kindly consented to a gentle grilling from you, the Uncut readers, for our next Audience With feature. So what do you want to ask the man in the translucent black cape? Send your questions to [email protected] by Friday (Feb 26), and Peter will answer the best ones in a future issue of Uncut.

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Peter Gunz Didn’t Like Lyfe Jennings Flirting With Amina Buddafly On IG


Peter Gunz & Lyfe Jennings traded a few words after the singer flirted with Peter’s ex, Amina Buddafly, on Instagram.

This quarantine has sparked some unlikely occurrences in pop culture but an Instagram beef between Peter Gunz and Lyfe Jennings was the last thing anyone expected. Love & Hip Hop fans watched the drama between Peter Gunz, Amina Buddafly, and Tara Wallace years ago. While their cheating scandal was what helped make the VH1 series the hit it is today, the trio is currently on better terms and co-parenting their children as peacefully as possible. Amina released a new song that featured her “Uptown Baby” ex, so she wanted to show the song some love by sharing a TikTok video to IG.

Peter Gunz Didn't Like Lyfe Jennings Flirting With Amina Buddafly On IG
Bennett Raglin / Stringer / Getty Images

Then, Lyfe Jennings slid in the comments with a little flirt action by writing, “What if I said…,” causing Peter to swoop in. “Trust me I’ve said it all… lol,” he replied. Lyfe took it in stride and added, “Can’t we all just get along lol we both have emotions for her.” He then directed his attention back to Amina with, “Hey bae.” Peter wasn’t having it.

“I think not brother that’s all you but my girls are all mine.. Knock yourself out I’m an extremely hard act to follow you can ask someone else we have in common.. lol.” Who that “someone else” is will remain a mystery, but these two continued to go back-and-forth. Peter Gunz told Lyfe to “ask your bae [Amina]” about his reputation, but Lyfe let him know that “I don’t ask women about n*ggas. If I got a question I ask the n*gga. In person.” There was no real resolve to this one, but check out the exchange in its entirety below.

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Singer Duffy Explains Music Break: "I Was Raped And Drugged"


Brit soul singer Duffy has been on a 10-year hiatus from music, which she now reveals was due to a shocking incident that involved being raped, drugged and held captive for days.

Back in the mid 2000s, a soul singer by the name of Duffy took the industry by storm with her huge hit “Mercy” and an equally successful debut album titled Rockferry released in 2008. She would go on to release only one more album, the 2010 follow-up Endlessly, before going on what has now been a 10-year musical hiatus. However, the break was surprisingly due to an extremely heartbreaking sexual assault situation that she had to endure and has finally got the courage to publicly reveal.

Singer Duffy Explains Music Break: "I Was Raped And Drugged"
Hannah Peters/Getty Images

Hopping on Instagram two days ago, Duffy wrote an extensive explanation behind her break from making music that sent shockwaves through those who caught wind of her post. “You can only imagine the amount of times I thought about writing this,” she started off her caption, following up by writing, “The way I would write it, how I would feel thereafter. Well, not entirely sure why now is the right time, and what it is that feels exciting and liberating for me to talk. I cannot explain it. Many of you wonder what happened to me, where did I disappear to and why.” She then made the big revelation, adding, “A journalist contacted me, he found a way to reach me and I told him everything this past summer. He was kind and it felt so amazing to finally speak. The truth is, and please trust me I am ok and safe now, I was raped and drugged and held captive over some days.”

She confirmed that the assault is behind her, writing, “Of course I survived. The recovery took time. There’s no light way to say it. But I can tell you in the last decade, the thousands and thousands of days I committed to wanting to feel the sunshine in my heart again, the sun does now shine.”

Some may have questioned as to why she didn’t channel the pain into her music as many artists have done in the past, to which she noted,”You wonder why I did not choose to use my voice to express my pain? I did not want to show the world the sadness in my eyes. I asked myself, how can I sing from the heart if it is broken? And slowly it unbroke. In the following weeks I will be posting a spoken interview. If you have any questions I would like to answer them, in the spoken interview, if I can.” 

She concluded her message with the following: “I have a sacred love and sincere appreciation for your kindness over the years. You have been friends. I want to thank you for that x Duffy.” She also adding a quick closing request to fans and the general public, writing, “Please respect this is a gentle move for me to make, for myself, and I do not want any intrusion to my family. Please support me to make this a positive experience.”

As someone who was shaping up to be in the same lane of Adele and the late Amy Winehouse, we can only pray that Duffy can make a full recovery and continue to make beautiful music as she once did. Much respect, Queen.

Read Duffy’s original post below: 

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Halsey Opens Up About Being Bipolar & Why She Won’t Discuss Boyfriend Evan Peters


Halsey discusses her life as of late.

Halsey dropped off her latest album Manic just a few days ago and the 16-song offering is an honest expression of a 25-year-old who’s made it out alive despite many trials and tribulations along the way. In light of the expressive project, the singer chatted with The Sun on a number of topics that surround her life as of late – one being her bipolar disorder. “I achieved a lot of my dreams at 19 years old. I’ve had a pretty invincible couple of years. So when I can’t do a simple f***ing task and I am so frustrated with myself because I feel so incapable, I get mad at myself and say, ‘F*** you’. That’s having bipolar,” she said. 

On the topic of her boyfriend Evan Peters, who she recently moved in with, Halsey expressed her plans to keep this relationship more private. 

“A friend of mine – another female artist who has been criticised for dating a lot of people – said, ‘Ashley, you need to live your fucking life and ignore what people say about you.’ And so now I keep everything to myself in terms of my romantic relationships,” she said. “I will say that it’s good to not date another musician as then your work follows you everywhere. Now it’s my personal life so I get to go home to somebody that I love and spend time with them, and it not be about work.”

Halsey Opens Up About Being Bipolar & Why She Won't Discuss Boyfriend Evan Peters
Kevin Winter/Getty Images
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Halsey & Evan Peters Are Officially Living Together


So cute.

After Halsey broke up with her British rocker last year, she and her cyber crush Evan Peters finally got together and debuted their relationship on Halloween, attending a party together. “Petition for Evan Peters to date me,” Halsey wrote in 2013 way before she and Evan linked up. New reports now suggest that the couple is still going strong since they have officially moved into together. 

Halsey & Evan Peters Are Officially Living Together
Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images

Before Halsey, Evan dated actress Emma Roberts and apparently he “took a long time of figuring himself out again before he was ready to date.” Now that they’re together, Evan’s friends approve and his “friends think they’re the perfect duo.”

In other Halsey news, the “Without Me” singer previously opened up about the paparazzi and how violent they’re getting. “What’s crazy to me, is if a guy camped outside your house and hid in a bush and took photos of you with a long lense camera every single day, without you knowing, you would be so creeped out and scared you would call the police and say you’re being harassed,” she wrote. “But when ur famous it’s just like ‘LOL U ASKED FOR THIS!!!!’ Some FUCK SHIT.”

Hopefully, they paparazzi cool off now that Evan is around. 

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Inside Bob Dylan’s Masked And Anonymous

Originally published in Uncut Take 85 [June 2004]

It’s 1964, and the singer is alone on the stage of New York’s Philharmonic Hall, talking to the darkness: “It’s just Halloween. I have my Bob Dylan mask on. I’m masquerading.”

It’s 1965, and the singer is in a black and white Britain, reading about himself in a newspaper: “God, I’m glad I’m not me.”

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It’s 1972, and the singer stands in the dust in Durango, saying his name: “Alias anything you please.”

It’s 1975, and the stage lights go up to reveal the singer is hiding his face behind a transparent Richard Nixon mask.

Now it’s 2003, and the singer is wearing a blonde wig and a woolly hat at the Sundance Film Festival, watching a movie he wrote under the alias Sergei Petrov. In the film he plays a singer who looks like him but calls himself Jack Fate. He’s called the movie Masked And Anonymous.

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The film is stuffed with more stars than any since Robert Altman‘s The Player. Despite – or maybe because – of this, the screening becomes one of the most infamous premieres in Sundance history, provoking walkouts and a firestorm of negative reviews. In the damning piece that sets the pace, veteran critic Roger Ebert decries the singer’s movie as “a vanity production beyond all reason”.

The critics’ objections ultimately boil down to one question: who the hell does Bob Dylan think he is?

It’s a good question. Here’s another: who the hell do we think Bob Dylan is? Hell, does anyone even think about Bob Dylan at all any more?

These are some though by no means all of the questions kicked up by Masked And Anonymous – the bewildering, beautiful, incisive, incoherent, intriguing and infuriating trashcan mystery which marks Dylan’s first serious sortie into cinema since 1987’s universally reviled Hearts Of Fire.

In fact, Masked And Anonymous reaches back further, almost 30 years, to Renaldo And Clara, the mixed-up confusion of hats, masks, mirrors and music Dylan shot on 1975’s Rolling Thunder Revue, and the way that film reached back to Dont Look Back, DA Pennebaker‘s seminal document of Dylan’s 1965 UK tour. Like those, Masked And Anonymous ends up being about a lot of things, but, like those, it starts off being about Bob Dylan.

“In a weird way, the movie is very autobiographical for Bob,” says Larry Charles, the Seinfeld writer/producer who co-wrote and directed Masked And Anonymous. “He’s a man of many masks. But looking at the mask is the way to understand him. If you’re willing to look deeply at the movie – at the mask, through the mask – you will learn all you need to know about who Bob Dylan is. It’s done with a code, but it’s all there.

“The movie’s like a puzzle. You’re the last piece. You have to put yourself into it.”

Here’s the puzzle, then. Masked And Anonymous describes an alternative universe in which the USA has degenerated into a filthy banana republic, ravaged by ceaseless civil war, dominated by a dying dictator whose image wallpapers the streets.

In a slum LA, a huckster music promoter, Uncle Sweetheart (John Goodman), up to his neck in debt, hooks up with TV producer Nina Veronica (Jessica Lange), herself under pressure from gangster-like bosses at the government-affiliated Network, to stage a televised benefit concert to aid – or distract – victims of the war.

Of course, they all plan skimming the profits. Thing is, they can’t attract anyone to play. So Sweetheart produces a tattered trump: his former client Jack Fate, a burned-out legend, currently rotting in the kind of overcrowded subterranean prison in which the Romans used to store the Christians until the lions were hungry.

Hearing Fate is involved, a seen-it-all journalist, Tom Friend (Jeff Bridges), rouses himself to get the story behind the concert – or rather, the story on Fate. Everyone vaguely remembers Fate, even if no one remembers why, or believes anyone would want to hear him sing. He has a reputation for making songs unrecognisable. Still, the show must go on.

That’s the plot. The texture is something else. Like Fate, Masked And Anonymous seems a relic of another era, a time when there was still the option of doing things differently. It plays like the Dennis Hopper of The Last Movie has ambushed Robert Altman’s Nashville. It might be the first sci-noir-bordertown-western-musical-art-movie.

In places, it looks like news footage, in others a post-apocalyptic sci-fi interzone, in others a carnival. The camera tracks around eavesdropping on characters as though the film were a documentary, but, while they act natural, they speak a stylised language, mingling hardboiled one-liners with streams of rhetorical, beat-generation blank verse.

Every now and then the film stops for a speech, a gag or a song (caught by a single, locked-off camera, a style modelled on Hank WilliamsGrand Ole Opry appearances and Johnny Cash‘s ’60s TV shows). It’s hard to tell if it’s replaying nouvelle vague distancing techniques or the rag-bag vaudeville of a Marx Brothers movie.

And in the middle of the mayhem, there’s Bob Dylan, walking his stiff, jiggling walk, extraordinary in grey Civil War duds and a pencil moustache reminiscent of a ’30s matinee idol. Squinting like Clint Eastwood, he doesn’t say much, as though he can’t decide whether he should be Bogart, Brando or Groucho. It’s Last Tango At The Circus In Casablanca.

Whatever it is, Masked And Anonymous began on the road in 2001. “At that time,” Charles reveals, “Bob had gotten very heavily into comedy. When he was touring, he’d watch a lot of comedy, got interested in that, and television. So, he decided maybe he’d do a comedy show on TV.

“Yeah, I know. Bob Dylan? A comedy show? On TV? But that’s what he wanted to do. So he started meeting writers.”

Charles, who with his dude’s shades and wizard’s mane has been described by Peter Farrelly as “a cross between Jerry Garcia and Charles Manson“, was introduced to Dylan by his friend, long-time Dylan associate Jeff Rosen. “Jeff said, ‘We’ve been setting up these meetings with writers, but nothing’s really coming – you wouldn’t consider sitting down with Bob would you?’ I was like, ‘Are you kidding?’

“I figured, I’ll have one meeting with Bob – he really insists on being called Bob, because Bob is the person; ‘Dylan’ is your problem – and I can tell all my friends, and that would be it. But we just immediately started riffing, and it developed into this very exhilarating verbal jam session. By the end of that meeting, we were working together. He walked me to my car, and I felt like I was on a *date*. Cars are driving by, I’m thinking, ‘Will someone please look and see – I’m with Bob Dylan!'”

Masked And Anonymous is officially credited to phantom screenwriters Rene Fontaine and Sergei Petrov. When the movie first opened in the US last July, Charles made a gallant effort to maintain the pretence that these ciphers really existed, but that’s one mask which has since slipped. The seeds of the script were found in a box of scrap paper Dylan produced: a pile of scribbled notes, names and lines, apparently the byproduct of his writing for “Love and Theft”. In fact, the film shares that album’s mysterious sense of weird, lost and hidden American history, of Tin Pan Alley echoes merging with plantation moans. The very title seems to call out to Charley Patton, the bluesman who recorded as “The Masked Marvel”, to whom Dylan dedicated “Love and Theft”‘s stunned apocalyptic bluegrass knees-up, “High Water“.

“Bob dumped all this paper on the table,” Charles remembers, “and said, ‘I dunno what to do with these.’ I looked through and said, ‘Well you could take this, and put it together with this, and that could be a character who says this‘ – almost like a William Burroughs, cut-up technique. We would just throw ideas out, attach them to other ideas. There was no plan. The film began to emerge naturally.”

That technique is reflected in the shape of the movie: a series of moments bumping into and bouncing off one another rather than connecting in any linear way. Charles says, “It’s a fascinating way of working.”

But it’s also anathema to Hollywood. When it came to raising the “shockingly small amount of money” needed to make the movie – around $7 million for a 20-day digital-video shoot, shoehorned into Dylan’s touring schedule – Charles says, “We got a lot of incredibly rude comments. People would be very cold, ruthless. They’d say: ‘Well, Bob Dylan’s never sold a movie ticket.’ I mean, we’re talking about possibly the only American artist who will survive the collapse of civilisation.”

This, too, fed into the shape of the film. “The reason we wound up with the cast we did,” Charles reveals, “is we thought we have to surround Bob with enough stars to make the people who are going to give us money comfortable they’re going to get it back.”

The extraordinary cast has been dismissed by many reviewers as simply the result of actors scrambling to associate themselves with Dylan. But as Charles points out, “These are all risk-taking actors. Jeff Bridges has always sought rigorously and vigorously independent movies. Mickey Rourke is an amazing, intense, unique American actor. It was a fight to get him in the movie. People were like, ‘Oh, he’s trouble.’ Bob and I actually fought to make sure Mickey was in, because he says something about the movie.

“Then there’s John Goodman and Jessica Lange, who often do Shakespeare or Brecht in theatre. These are great connoisseurs of language. They were attracted to the script’s language, which is very different from what you find in American cinema today, and the ideas. These actors are looking for that kind of experience, some kind of challenge. Some kind of spiritual quality to their work. We couldn’t give them money. But we could give them that.”

The film’s eventual producer, Nigel Sinclair of Spitfire Films, responded for similar reasons. “I got involved,” he says, “because this film addressed some human and political issues that are really important, and are becoming more important, at the beginning of the 21st century in terms of social groups, friction and bloodshed, and what happens to us as a human tribe.

“That’s what this film is about: the link between our existential, individual experience, and, if you will, the political, group experience – the kind of battle that has gone on since Marxism was first introduced, as to whether the individual or society in the end is most important.”

In all the potshots fired at Dylan for daring to make a movie, there seemed a reluctance to acknowledge that, wrapped in the film’s woolly ball of confusion, there are indeed hard questions. About America; about political mayhem; about race; about business, government and the media; about the co-opting of the counterculture; about corruption and greed; about image and reality and how they get mistaken for each other; about the artist’s responsibility; about individuals with their own problems, caught up in all this, finding themselves unable to understand, let alone help each other.

Still, more than anything, the film is about Dylan. He’s the filter through which everything else is viewed. How else to explain why, when we first glimpse Jeff Bridges as the journalist who would be Fate’s nemesis, he’s hiding inside a hooded sweatshirt exactly like the one Dylan wore while recording Under The Red Sky? Why, before going after Fate in the film’s most extraordinary scene, turning on him with a creepy, hectoring rap about Jimi Hendrix, Fate/Dylan’s absence at Woodstock, and the meaning of Hendrix’s epochal reordering of “The Star Spangled Banner“, Bridges changes costume, re-emerging as a black-leather-jacketed xerox of the Dylan of Dont Look Back?

“Yes. He’s dressed exactly like Bob Dylan 1965,” Charles confirms. “Down to the *shoes*. Most people don’t pick up on that. The film is littered with those kinds of details. In some sense, everybody is a reflection of Bob. But it occurred to me very vividly that Jeff was also playing the young journalist Bob gets into the argument with in Dont Look Back, 40 years later.

“Bob is constantly competing with the younger versions of himself. That, I think, is one of his big issues with the media, not accepting him for what he is, whatever that might be. He’s constantly fighting his own past. He can’t really enjoy his own music, in a sense. He has to keep moving forward.

“‘Don’t look back’ becomes a theme. Of this film, and his life.” 

Accompanied by a soundtrack of Dylan covers – familiar songs rendered as Japanese punk or Italian rap until they blur into a babbling muzak Esperanto, pierced occasionally by Dylan’s own lacerating performances – Masked And Anonymous is, finally, Dylan talking to himself, about himself, where he’s been, where he is and what he sees. If that’s a vanity project, then that’s what his work has always been.

“I was always a singer, maybe no more than that…” Jack Fate concludes. “I stopped trying to figure everything out a long time ago.” Maybe this is just another song. Maybe it’s just Halloween.

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Broadcast Spell Blanket Collected Demos 2006-2009

Broadcast always attracted plenty of speculation and intrigue when they were active, but since the death of singer Trish Keenan at the age of 42 in January 2011, the band’s enigma – and reputation – has only grown. Eleven years after their final album – an eccentric soundtrack to Peter Strickland’s Berberian Sound Studio, completed by remaining member James Cargill – Broadcast are more popular than ever. Their 750,000 monthly listeners on Spotify hammer the Birmingham group’s first three albums – The Noise Made By People, Haha Sound and Tender Buttons – which Warp have kept repressing since 2015 to meet demand. Walk into any coffee shop in Brooklyn, anecdotal evidence suggests, and there’s an 85 per cent chance they’ll be playing Broadcast.

There’s a sense today that Broadcast were on the cusp of further greatness at the time of Keenan’s passing, though it’s easy, with hindsight, to ascribe momentum to a career cut short. In fact, back then the group were deep in the midst of their most experimental phase when Keenan died from pneumonia after contracting swine flu at the end of a tour of Australia. By that point, Broadcast had become the kind of cult act they once looked up to in the mid-’90s – radical psych explorers like the United States Of America or White Noise – peddling esoteric sound collages drawn from a very British palette of trippy Hammer films, the smoke and mirrors FX of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop and the sinister air of arcane 1970s kids’ TV shows like Children Of The Stones and The Owl Service that, looking back, seemed entirely unsuitable for the intended audience.

This is best expressed on their final release as a duo, …Investigate Witch Cults Of The Radio Age, a 2009 collaboration with The Focus Group – the electronic project of their long-time graphic designer and Ghost Box label co-founder Julian House – in which Cargill and Keenan conjure lurid pastorals and anxious freakbeat full of tumbling jazzy drum fills and babbling circuitry, a cursed library disc of bad vibes and auditory hallucinations. The pair appeared quite content to keep exploring this obscure hauntological world from their home in Hungerford – live footage from late 2010 shows them playing versions of tracks from that record in Australia – but, compellingly weird as it is, what’s absent from this period is the warmth and emotion, the human touch, that Keenan brings. For Broadcast, her presence is the strange attractor.

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Perhaps that’s why their last commercially inclined album, 2005’s Tender Buttons, has come to be regarded as their definitive release. This is the last collection of conventional songs composed by Cargill and Keenan, who, working as a duo after losing their drummer, stripped their sound back to rhythm boxes and electronics in a bid to move away from the ’60s chanson style that characterised their earlier work. Keenan’s pop instinct propels “Tears In The Typing Pool” and “America’s Boy” to great heights, but the music is colder, more primitive, the mood mysterious and restless. Coolly received at the time, you can hear its influence on Thom Yorke’s solo work, the sci-fi imperative of Flying Lotus and the LA beat scene, and even Paul Weller, whose love of Broadcast led to him releasing an EP of spooked exotica, “In Another Room”, on Ghost Box a few years ago.

Appropriately for a band whose enchanting music evokes memories that are at once familiar yet unknowable, Spell Blanket – Collected Demos 2006-2009 upturns everything we thought we knew about Broadcast during that final period. It fills in gaps we didn’t know were there, offers tantalising clues to their unfinished fifth album, and somehow ends up enhancing their mystique, despite laying all the cards on the table. Like opening a treasure chest and basking in the golden glow, Spell Blanket collects 36 demos and sketches from Keenan’s extensive archive of four-track tapes and MiniDiscs, recorded in the years after Tender Buttons, and which it’s assumed would have shaped the sound of their next record – all while they focused, as if in a parallel world, on the folk-horror experiments. It’s the first of two Broadcast archival releases this year by Warp; the second, Distant Call, due in the autumn, rounds up early demos of songs from the first three albums and will be the group’s final release.

Readers of Broadcast’s Future Crayon blog will know that, each September 28, Cargill posts a birthday tribute to Keenan, who was his partner. On a few of these occasions, he’s posted an unreleased Broadcast demo or audio clip, something that Keenan made. The first one he posted, in 2012, the year after her death, was a 40-second recording she made of herself, walking outside, cheerfully singing a verse called “The Song Before The Song Comes Out”, almost making it up as she goes. It’s intimate and unaffected, presumably never intended for wider circulation, and it opens this collection, setting the tone for a wealth of material that sheds new light on Broadcast’s songwriting process and Keenan’s approach to lyrics, providing insight into her state of mind through the words she wrote.

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What strikes you is the sheer variety of styles and textures that Keenan and Cargill were playing around with. It’s a shimmering patchwork of ideas and moments, some more realised than others, some beautiful, some stark, and in this sense, Spell Blanket follows on quite naturally from Berberian Sound Studio, itself a series of short film cues. Ranging in length from 30 seconds to close to four minutes, there’s enough potential material here for three or four albums, if only the demos could be worked on and completed – but that will never happen and, in any case, there’s a certain charm to the brevity and roughness of these recordings that fits Broadcast’s aesthetic. In just the first eight tracks, there’s spectral hymnal drone (“March Of The Fleas”), choral loops (“Greater Than Joy”) and flute-laced witch-folk (“Mother Plays Games”), followed by the fuzzy soft-focus psych of “Roses Red”, an irresistible minute of “Hip Bone To Hip Bone” and the heavy ritual groove of “Running Back To Me”. Elsewhere, we hear Keenan trying a technique on “Singing Game”, there’s a lush synth surge called “Dream Power”, and a killer cut titled “The Games You Play”. The whole thing is an abundance of riches that illustrates how versatile and special Broadcast could be.

Keenan’s poetic lyrics touch on memories of childhood, the natural and supernatural world, her body and her dreams, seeking comfort in the domestic – familiar subjects for her, but here, presented in a beautifully designed booklet by House, it all represents something quite moving and substantial, a testament to her unique vision. Phrases stand out: “Hairpin memories loose in wish water”; “Mondrian child let loose with the pen”; “One by one the clocks fall asleep”; “The trees full of new leaves offering green tears to the earth”; “Drink up your water, Mother, watch your daughter growing tall”.

This is where the heart is, in these first takes and early demos, when the sentiment is true and the feeling is pure. Of course, it’s all we’ve got at this point, all that’s left at the end of the story. Spell Blanket is a glimpse at what might have been. A memory of the future.

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Introducing the latest Ultimate Music Guide: Black Sabbath

Our latest Deluxe, 148-page edition

It is, the internet tells me, shortly after Christmas 1987, and a few friends and I are huddled in a chilly corner of a pub in London’s Soho. We are here for various reasons. For one, we know that they serve pints of bitter even to self-evidently underage customers like us. For another, hard rock lore suggests that this is a spot we might run into Lemmy – surely an encounter to delight all parties equally. The main reason we’re there, though, is to find consolation after grave disappointment. We have failed to phone ahead before travelling from the provinces, and so have only within the last hour learned that the Black Sabbath show at Hammersmith Odeon we hoped to witness this evening has been cancelled. 

As you’ll read in this new 148-page deluxe edition of our Ultimate Music Guide to Black Sabbath, we certainly weren’t the only people to have been wrongfooted by Black Sabbath in the 1980s. In a new interview for the magazine, Tony Iommi launches a new box set which attempts to find some continuity in this era of the band, and explains some of what was going on in an era which was confusingly both post-Ozzy and post-Dio, but also post-Gillan, pre-Dio and pre-Ozzy.

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Tony shares humbling tales of advertising in the local paper for a frontman, of regrouping with known heavy Midlands associates, and of playing in Russia to a crowd of rabid fans, but also to a decorously-seated collection of Soviet-era dignitaries. Much like my teenage Sabbath fan self, Tony Iommi was confident in the material and in what we didn’t then call the Black Sabbath brand. He also believed in his new singer: Tony Martin. “If you have a factory and someone leaves,” Iommi tells Peter Watts, “you don’t close the factory, you hire someone new.”

There’s a lot to unpack in Iommi’s analogy of Sabbath to a factory. But Sabbath certainly was for many years a leading British heavy industry; the awesome swing of the band given a engaging character in the person of Ozzy Osbourne, a soulboy and a Beatles fan transformed into a prince of darkness during a formative Cumbrian tour. Geezer Butler told me a few months ago how impressed he was and remains with Ozzy’s musicianship. As you read Ozzy’s own vivid intro to the magazine, or enjoy his interviews in these pages, you’ll salute that and much more besides. 

He certainly knows what’s what in Black Sabbath. “We’ve been friends, we’ve been enemies, said all sorts of things about each other,” he tells us, “but no-one can come up with them riffs like Tony Iommi. I don’t know how he does it. It’s scary, like “What?” Sometimes he would come in and say, “Ah, I’ve got nothing.” Then he’d be tuning up and this amazing fucking riff would come out. “Well, that sounded like something, Tone…”  

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Enjoy the magazine. You can get it in shops next week, or pre-order here now.

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Perfect Circle

On a Thursday night in February at the famous 40 Watt club in Athens, Georgia, REM fans got to witness the closest thing we may ever see to a full-band reunion. As actor Michael Shannon and guitarist Jason Narducy brought their touring celebration of 1984’s Murmur to REM’s hometown, members of the original band began joining the the fray, until Bill Berry, Peter Buck, Mike Mills and Michael Stipe were sharing a stage for the first time in 17 years.

DAVID BOWIE IS ON THE COVER OF THE LATEST UNCUT – ORDER YOUR COPY HERE

“Bill asked us if he could play piano on ‘Perfect Circle,’ which he does on the record,” says Narducy. “And when I saw ‘Pretty Persuasion’ coming up on the setlist, I asked our stage manager to see if he could find Mike Mills and invite him up, since that song has such heavy backing vocals. He jumped up and kept on jumping up.” Buck, meanwhile, had been at the club since soundcheck, giving Narducy a few pointers. “Even when he was on-stage with us, he’s showing me these little things as he was playing on the record. It was very touching for a massive fan like myself. I still don’t think I’ve even grasped it, honestly.”

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Finally, at the end of the night, Stipe jumped on-stage to thank the band and the excited crowd, completing the quartet. “It’s an honour to hear the songs so fresh, live in a room again,” Stipe tells Uncut later. “Since I was always singing them, I never got to hear them.”

The reunion was the unexpected culmination of Shannon and Narducy’s tour celebrating the 40th anniversary of REM’s legendary debut, with the acclaimed actor and the veteran sideman covering Murmur in its entirety. “It’s not a tribute band,” says Narducy. “We’re not using the exact same equipment or dressing up like them. It’s a pretty weird thing that seems to be working.” The band is more like a theater troupe using the album as a script; rather than recreate it, they reinterpret it each night, with Shannon bringing a more punk-derived vocal and Narducy turning Buck’s guitar riffs inside out. “I was already in love with this band, but then I went deeper into their catalogue and learned the songs inside out,” says Narducy. “Now I’m an even bigger fan.”

The pair both latched on to REM as teenagers in the 1980s, discovering them via Document and then working backwards as they moved forward with their own creative careers. After playing in the influential bands Verboten and Verbow, Narducy has lately been touring with Bob Mould and Sunny Day Real Estate. And many of Shannon’s roles involve music and musicians, including his recent performance as George Jones in the Showtime series George & Tammy. Their partnership has roots in Chicago’s anything-goes music scene, when they met ten years ago to cover The Velvet Underground & Nico with local alt.country singer-songwriter Robbie Fulks. Since then, they’ve done similar sets devoted to The Cars, The Smiths, Neil Young and The Modern Lovers.

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Of all the albums they’ve covered together, none has provoked such a strong reaction from fans – or from the original artists – as Murmur. Even before they coaxed their heroes back on-stage, they were playing to some of their biggest and most excited crowds yet. “There’s something about early REM that has really struck a chord,” says Narducy. “They were one of the biggest bands in the world, but they’ve maintained this grace and creativity that is so rare.”

REM are on the cover of Ultimate Record Collection: The 500 Greatest Albums of the 1990s, which is on sale now – order your copy here

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Courteeners announce their only “North of England” show for summer 2024

Courteeners have announced that they will head to Lytham Festival in 2024 for their one and only North of England show of the summer.

The Manchester-based band – comprised of Liam Fray, Michael Campbell and Daniel Moores – are the first headlining act to be announced as part of the five-night festival, with their set slated to take place on Friday, July 5.

The Kooks and indie pop singer Nieve Ella have been announced as opening support for the show date. Tickets for the festival date are set to go on general sale on Friday, November 24 at 9:30am local time. Visit here to purchase tickets.

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Speaking about their headlining slot in a press release, Courteeners frontman Liam Fray said: “We are very much looking forward to making our debut and joining the illustrious list of acts that have performed at the Lytham festival. We made the short pilgrimage from Manchester last year to watch The Strokes and were blown away by the buzz of the locals and the beauty of the scenery. What a Friday it’s going to be on July 5th. See you down the front.”

Lytham Festival co-founder Peter Taylor added: “Courteeners are without a doubt one of the country’s biggest and best-loved bands. This is an exclusive performance for the North of England so if you want to see them next summer you need to head to Lytham Festival.”

In other news, Fray recently revealed a one-off Christmas acoustic gig to be held in Manchester.

The frontman will play an intimate acoustic gig at Manchester’s Albert Hall on December 17. Tickets will go on sale October 27 at 9am – you can purchase them here.

Fray recently spoke with NME at Glastonbury 2023, where he opened up about two new albums from The Courteeners.

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He revealed a few new song titles including ‘Solitude Of The Night Bus’ and ‘When Are You In New York Next?’ – as well as the claim that another sounds like “Mac Miller covering Leonard Cohen”. Fray also stated that the new music “is gonna blow people’s heads off”.

“The song is king, and the song will always win,” he said. “When I play these new ones to people, I feel dead happy. It feels cool to be in this position. Someone who I trust told me that they’re the best songs I’ve written since [2008 debut album] ‘St Jude’.”

“I want to do two albums,” he continued. “One is fun and the other is piano, drum machines, a bit moodier. Don’t expect any hits off that one, but I know what will happen – they’ll be the hits and no one will give a fuck about the ones that I think are good. The ones that are sleepers will be loved. But also, who cares? I love that idea from tonight of feeling so insignificant as part of Glastonbury. I’m going to try and transfer that to the rest of my life.”

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Liam Gallagher to make surprise tram announcements in Manchester this week

Metrolink has announced that Liam Gallagher will be this week’s surprise voice for Manchester’s tram announcements.

The former Oasis member and Manchester music legend is set to take over the tram announcements in celebration of the Bee Network, Greater Manchester’s integrated public transport system, and Beyond the Music festival. Gallagher will be announcing the stops as they go via some pre-recorded snippets.

Beyond the Music Festival is a new fest and change-making conference that is set to take place in Manchester from October 11-14. Its focus is on new music, grass roots venues and developing talent and infrastructure support for the city region that will make an impact on the music and content sectors across the UK and beyond.

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Singer Liam Gallagher performs on stage during day 2 of 'Corona Capital 2022' at Autodromo Hermanos Rodriguez on November 19, 2022 in Mexico City, Mexico. (Photo by Jaime Nogales/Medios y Media/Getty Images)
Singer Liam Gallagher performs on stage during day 2 of ‘Corona Capital 2022’ at Autodromo Hermanos Rodriguez on November 19, 2022 in Mexico City, Mexico. (Photo by Jaime Nogales/Medios y Media/Getty Images)

Speaking about the opportunity in a press release, a spokesperson for Gallagher said: “Liam’s doing his bit to get behind the festival and encourage people to get into the city and support new up and coming talent.

“When the request was first made by Bee Network champion Andy Burnham, Liam loved the idea of surprising tram users by doing the announcements and he was given the chance to choose his favourite line. You’ll have to get onto a tram into the city to find out which it is!”

Greater Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham added: “It means a lot to us that Liam has agreed to do this and show his support for his home city. Supporting our music venues and giving people cheaper and better public transport to and from our gigs is what we’re all about. I am sure that Liam’s dulcet tones will wake up a few early-morning commuters, brighten up many a journey and produce a lot of smiles along the way.”

Liam Gallagher performs on stage at Isle Of Wight Festival 2021 at Seaclose Park on September 17, 2021 in Newport, Isle of Wight. (Photo by Mark Holloway/Redferns)
Liam Gallagher performs on stage at Isle Of Wight Festival 2021 at Seaclose Park on September 17, 2021 in Newport, Isle of Wight. (Photo by Mark Holloway/Redferns)

Beyond the Music Festival is set to host more than 100 artists will be performing at 17 grassroots venues across the city – including an entire day of free concerts in partnership with Lush, titled ‘Music for Everyone’ – culminating in a secret gig sponsored by The Face. Visit here for tickets and more information.

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In other news, Peter Kay recently suggested that he has been banned from presenting at the BRIT Awards following his feud with Gallagher.

The comedian hit headlines in 2010 after calling the former Oasis frontman a “knobhead” while hosting that year’s ceremony.

Writing in his new biography TV: Big Adventures On The Small Screen, Kay reflected on the incident, writing (via The Mirror): “Liam Gallagher won an award. He swaggered on stage to collect it, then threw it into the audience and walked off.

“He could have hit somebody in the face with it. What a knobhead, I thought. So I said just that when I walked back to the mic ‘what a knobhead.’”

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The Beatles Revolver: Special Edition

Since it began in 2017, The Beatles’ lavish remix campaign has dealt with the downers. Paul McCartney might have relished making Sgt Pepper, but a tripping John Lennon was largely losing interest; much of The White Album was made solo by an increasingly disjointed band; Let It Be captures the group’s fatal disintegration and the mess that followed; and Abbey Road’s majesty was largely possible only because it was a last hurrah. To the rest of us, these are stunning, sometimes world-altering listens, but they certainly make being a Fab seem like a chore; it was a time of deadlines, joyless business meetings and sizzling resentment, as old friends grew apart and others fought for recognition.

  • ORDER NOW: David Bowie is on the cover of the latest issue of Uncut

Where was that camaraderie, that warmth, that sense of wonder that we associate with The Beatles? Certainly, Peter Jackson’s Get Back put a more positive spin on a dark time – but to find them truly united, excited and at their creative peak, we have to look to Revolver, the latest staging post on Giles Martin’s journey through the albums made by his old man and the Fabs. Here’s the group expanding the possibilities of recorded music just as they were expanding their minds with drugs, spirituality and avant-garde arts; taking influence from soul, funk, Indian music, the baroque and musique concrète; creating a sound far removed from the more polite Rubber Soul, released nine months earlier.

Revolver hardly needs improving, but Martin has done his best to revamp it for the 21st century. He’s had the assistance of some Terminator-level AI machine-learning developed in New Zealand during the making of the Get Back series. There it was used to separate music and speech on old Nagra tapes, but here it’s been employed to split instruments that have been imprisoned on a single track for decades, so opening the possibility of a remix. In “Taxman”, for example, drums, bass and guitar have been separated, and the results are fantastic, especially on Starr’s drums and McCartney’s bass, which are clearer, punchier and even more nuanced. Ringo is essential across this new Revolver: his inventive fills are foregrounded and endlessly fascinating, whether taut and heavy on “She Said She Said” or subtle and atmospheric on “Here, There And Everywhere”.

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As with Martin’s other special-edition remixes, his work is subtle and tasteful. That’s not to say there aren’t noticeable changes, however. On “For No One”, McCartney’s Clavichord and piano are separated across the stereo field, lending the track a new lustrousness.
Starr’s drums were barely there in the original, drowned out by tambourine in the left channel, but that’s been rectified. The overall effect is now more reminiscent of Brian Wilson’s contemporary work, surely McCartney’s intention, and it clearly shows the song to be a stepping stone to the lusher “Penny Lane” the following year.

“Doctor Robert”, not Revolver’s strongest moment, is enhanced by a walloping bass
drum and snare, and fits closer with the super-compressed Revolver aesthetic. “Love
You To” benefits from a tighter, more upfront sound too, the sitars, tabla and fuzz guitars buzzing with a humming, psychedelic energy. “Here, There And Everywhere”, on the other hand, is opened up: the backing vocals are clearer than before, each singer discernible. The horns on “Got To Get You Into My Life” are still spiky, but they’re up close in the verses – reedy, breathy and present.

While there are no real revelations on “Tomorrow Never Knows”, it’s still a sea of sound, one of the most striking three minutes of music ever created. It’s a mongrel – Stockhausen tape loops meets Indian drone meets Tibetan Book Of The Dead – but the result seems entirely new, even 56 years later. Shockingly, of course, it was the first song recorded for Revolver.

As is customary with these special editions, there are also two discs of session highlights. As always, there’s great chat – the band’s argument about Paul’s organ at the start of an early version of “Got To Get You Into My Life”, for instance, or George Martin, Paul and the string octet discussing how to approach “Eleanor Rigby” – and some cuts we’ve heard on the Anthology series, such as the aqueous first take of “Tomorrow Never Knows”. But there are new treasures here too: the second version of “Got To Get You Into My Life” with fuzz guitars taking the place of the horns is meaner and perhaps better than the final version; Take 2 of the first version of “And Your Bird Can Sing” is a Byrds-y delight, all glittering 12-string, with different harmonies and the eventual main riff appearing only as a solo; “Yellow Submarine” arrives as a forlorn Lennon waltz (“In the place where I was born/No-one cared”) like something off Plastic Ono Band a lifetime later.

For the first time, The Beatles had the freedom to entirely arrange songs in the studio. As a result, there are a host of extra harmonies, melodies and overdubs on some of these earlier versions that didn’t make the final cut – “anybody got a bit of money” on “Taxman – Take 11”, say, or the “somehow, some way” on the chorus of “Got To Get You Into My Life – First Version, Take 5”. Perhaps that’s part of Revolver’s charm, as opposed to the woollier, Technicolor Pepper, for instance: in finalising the arrangements, the band and George Martin dramatically thinned them out, leaving only the best elements – often the noisiest electric guitars – in stark monochrome.

Some of these early versions also remind us of the hive-mind of The Beatles, of how ideas and inspirations flowed between them. Each writer, for instance, contributes a song based around a drone, with an occasional hinted chord a tone below: Lennon with “Tomorrow Never Knows”, Harrison with “Love You To” and McCartney with the verses of “Got To Get You Into My Life”. An early demo of “She Said…” is also built around a droning bass note, the chords shifting above that constant, while “Taxman” almost pulls the same trick in its middle-eight.

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Listening to this package, it’s clearer than ever just how Revolver set the template for The Beatles’ future: the sound effects of “Yellow Submarine” bubbled up into “Revolution 9”, and “For No One” and “Eleanor Rigby” would blossom into “Penny Lane”, “Fixing A Hole” and “Martha My Dear”, while “She Said She Said” presaged the white-hot fuzz of “Revolution” and “Helter Skelter”, and “Love You To” would find reincarnation as “Within You Without You”.

Darker clouds are forecast here, too. “For No One” was recorded by only McCartney and Starr, a throw-forward to the studio fragmentation of Pepper and The White Album, while Harrison’s third composition was apparently only allowed when Lennon failed to deliver more songs – his lack of engagement, and material, would soon become an issue.

Before all that, though, The Beatles would play their final proper gig, three weeks after Revolver’s release, without ever performing a note of this album’s songs. They were a fully operational group no more. The aftershocks, as documented on the rest of Giles Martin’s remixed albums, are incredible, but the epicentre – their peak, as well as the end of something – can be found here. As McCartney writes in the new liner notes, “all in all, not a bad album.”

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Uncut January 2023

HAVE A COPY SENT STRAIGHT TO YOUR HOME

David Bowie, Black Midi, Loretta Lynn, Joan Shelley, Nathan Salsburg, Michael Head, Neu!, Richard Dawson, The Beach Boys, Kevin Rowland and Bruce Springsteen all feature in the new Uncut, dated January 2023 and in UK shops from November 10 or available to buy online now.

DAVID BOWIE: In 1971, David Bowie was all about ch-changes. Inspired by the America of Andy Warhol and Lou Reed, Bob Dylan and After The Gold Rush, he delivered a daring, career-reviving triumph with his first truly great album. As a new boxset, Divine Symmetry, digs deep into the 12 months that led up to the release of Hunky Dory, collaborators and confidants reveal the secrets of this major turning point in Bowie’s evolution. “With David, it was onward and upward all the time,” learns Peter Watts. Look out, you rock’n’rollers!

This issue of Uncut is available to buy by clicking here – with FREE delivery to the UK and reduced delivery charges for the rest of the world.

Inside the issue, you’ll find:

LORETTA LYNN: A revolutionary spirit in country music, Loretta Lynn chronicled ordinary women’s lives for over six decades. Here a cast of admirers – including Lucinda Williams, Margo Price and kd lang – pay tribute to the singer and songwriter and her defiant songs of experience. “She did what she wanted to do. She was independent. She was rebellious,” hears Graeme Thomson.

BLACK MIDI: Chess-playing, concept-album-loving jazz proggers, Black Midi are the British alternative scene’s ambitious eccentrics. We catch them on tour in America – with contemporaries Black Country, New Road – where their latest album, Hellfire – a song cycle about war, prostitution and death – is going down a storm. Tom Pinnock hears how Count Dracula, Jeff Wayne’s War Of The Worlds and “circus music” have helped shape their exhilarating 2022.

JOAN SHELLEY & NATHAN SALSBURG: During 2022, a lot of good music has come out of Joan Shelley and Nathan Salsburg’s remote farm near Louisville, Kentucky – from Shelley’s timeless and vital album The Spur to the latest instalment in Salsburg’s Landwerk series of sound collages. Stephen Deusner heads into the woods to hear about how parenthood, isolation and upheaval have shaped the couple’s past 12 months.

THE UNCUT REVIEW OF 2022: The essential albums, reissues, films and books of the year.

MICHAEL HEAD: The creator of Uncut’s third best album of 2022 on his magical Mersey adventures with The Pale Fountains, Shack, Arthur Lee and Lee Mavers.

NEU!: The making of “Hero”.

RICHARD DAWSON: The idiosyncratic songsmith’s path from “very bad” debut to multi-layered latest.

THE BEACH BOYS: A “new Beach Boys” attempt to take an audience with them into the heart of the 1970s.

CLICK TO GET THE NEW UNCUT DELIVERED TO YOUR DOOR

In our expansive reviews section, we take a look at new records from Bruce Springsteen, Duke Garwood, Rozi Plain, Neil Young and The Crazy Horse and more, and archival releases from The Beach Boys, Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers, Emahoy Tsegué-Maryam Guebrou, and others. We catch the Roxy Music live; among the films, DVDs and TV programmes reviewed are White Noise, Aftersun, Three Minutes: A Lengthening, Lynch/Oz and Hong Kong: City On Fire; while in books there’s Bob Dylan and Bono.

Our front section, meanwhile, features Jerry Lee Lewis, Sparklehorse, Bill Berry, The Murder Capital, while, at the end of the magazine, Kevin Rowland shares his life in music.

You can pick up a copy of Uncut in the usual places, where open. But otherwise, readers all over the world can order a copy from here.

CLICK TO GET THE NEW UNCUT DELIVERED TO YOUR DOOR

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Taylor Swift’s new album ‘Midnights’ breaks record for most-streamed album in a day on Spotify

Taylor Swift has broken Spotify‘s record for the most-streamed album in a single day with ‘Midnights‘.

  • READ MORE: Taylor Swift – ‘Midnights’ review: a shimmering return to pure pop

The pop star’s 10th album, which was released at midnight yesterday (October 21), has smashed the record as Spotify users reported a huge spike in outages.

Swift has thanked her fans for “doing something mind blowing”.

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“How did I get this lucky, having you guys out here doing something this mind blowing?! Like what even just happened?!” she said.

Swift has described the record as the story of “13 sleepless nights scattered throughout my life” and “a journey through terrors and sweet dreams”.

In a four-star review, NME‘s Hannah Mylrea praised Swift’s “shimmering return to pure pop” on a record that “pivots away from her mellow lockdown creations and recent re-recording project, offering up brighter, future-facing sounds”.

The news comes as it emerged that Swift teased lyrics from ‘Midnights’ earlier this year during her 2022 New York University commencement speech.

Taylor Swift
Taylor Swift performs live in 2019. CREDIT: Doug Peters/EMPICS

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Elsewhere, the singer-songwriter has released the music video for lead single ‘Anti-Hero’, which brings Swift’s thoughts about her life being “unmanageably sized” to life.

In other related news, fans have spotted a Janet Jackson reference in Taylor Swift‘s new collaboration with Lana Del Rey, ‘Snow On The Beach’, and just hours after she released ‘Midnights’ Swift has surprised fans with a deluxe edition of her 10th album, adding to it an extra seven tracks.

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Ed Sheeran had “already started” writing James Bond theme when he was replaced by Billie Eilish

Ed Sheeran has said he’d already “started writing” the theme song for No Time To Die when he was replaced by Billie Eilish.

Back in 2019, Sheeran’s manager revealed that the star had met James Bond producer Barbara Broccoli two years prior to discuss penning the official track for the most recent film in the hit spy franchise.

  • READ MORE: Ed Sheeran – ‘=’ review: the millennial Lionel Richie indulges his saccharine streak

Danny Boyle, who worked with Sheeran on Richard Curtis’ Yesterday (2019), was lined up to direct the 25th Bond movie at the time (he later quit due to “creative differences”, with Cary Joji Fukunaga taking over the role).

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“Obviously they changed directors but we’re still open to it,” Stuart Camp explained. “But they’re not even having those conversations yet.”

He added: “It’s certainly something [Sheeran would] want to do though, it’s a box that’s still to be ticked, for sure.”

But the No Time To Die theme ended up going to Billie Eilish, who went on to win her first Oscar for the song.

During an appearance on That Peter Crouch Podcast this week, Sheeran explained: “I was within a fucking gnat’s pube of doing one [a Bond theme], but then they changed directors, changed scripts and that was it all done.

“I had started writing it. I’m not gonna pretend it didn’t hurt not doing it.”

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Sheeran went on to say that his Bond dream isn’t over yet, however: “I think eventually as an English singer you’ve got to eventually do a Bond song. If they come back I’ll be like, ‘Yeah yeah, of course’.”

Sheeran had talked about potentially writing a track for a James Bond film during an interview in 2014, but admitted that he may not be the right artist.

“I’d love to do a James Bond song, but can you imagine it?” he said. “I just wasn’t born with the James Bond voice. You never know – I’m not ruling it out. Maybe in 10 years time, when my balls drop…”

He added: “I think the James Bond theme tune should be ballsy. I feel like if I was going to do it, it would sound a bit wet.”

Sheeran recently opened up, meanwhile, about the impact that Queen Elizabeth II‘s Golden Jubilee had on his career.

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Ed Sheeran performs surprise gig outside Ipswich Town Hall

On Friday (October 7), Ed Sheeran performed a surprise hometown gig on the steps of Ipswich Town Hall – see footage and reaction below.

Fans in the Suffolk city were surprised to see Sheeran, who sponsors the town’s football club, rock up in the centre of town to perform his debut album track ‘The A Team’.

“I’ve played so many shows here and have such love for this place,” he told the large crowd who had gathered. “I’m so happy to be back here.”

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According to reports from the Ipswich Star, Sheeran performed with an acoustic guitar he had bought earlier that day from a local music shop. In an Instagram video, he announced the set in a video recorded at the Music World store.

After the performance, Sheeran then signed the guitar and gifted it to a 10-year-old fan who is an aspiring musician and guitarist.

An attendee told the Daily Mail: ‘Such a humble guy coming to Ipswich playing us some of his fantastic hits and ending it by giving his guitar to an up and coming 10-year-old guitarist in the audience. Wow. Thank you Ed.’

See footage and reaction to the surprise gig below.

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The impromptu Ipswich gig was the latest in a series of surprise performances from Sheeran in recent weeks.

Last month, he surprised clubbers in Ibiza with an impromptu, four-song set that featured a variety of karaoke classics. On Monday, September 26, Sheeran appeared onstage at the House In Paradise club at O Beach in Ibiza to perform his 2017 hit ‘Shape Of You’ after being introduced as “the biggest popstar in the world.”

He then launched into The Backstreet Boys‘ ‘I Want It That Way’ before diving into the crowd. Returning to the stage, he performed Neil Diamond’s ‘Sweet Caroline’ and ended with his take on Britney Spears’ ‘Hit Me Baby One More Time’.

Sheeran also made a surprise performance at an Oktoberfest event in Frankfurt earlier this month.

In more official matters, the singer has shared details of a North American tour for 2023. The pop star will bring his ongoing ‘Mathematics’ world tour to the US and Canada next year, with support from Khalid, Dylan, Rosa Linn, Cat Burns, Maisie Peters and Russ on differing dates. It’s in support of his latest album, 2021’s ‘=‘ and will also hear him play songs from his back catalogue.

Tickets go on general sale here next Friday (October 14) at 10am PT (6pm BST). See the full list of dates below.

MAY 2023
06 – AT&T Stadium Arlington, Texas, US *
13 – NRG Stadium, Houston, Texas, US *
20 – Raymond James Stadium, Tampa, Florida, US *
27 – Mercedes-Benz Stadium, Atlanta, Georgia, US *

JUNE 2023
03 – Lincoln Financial Field, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, US *
10 – MetLife Stadium, East Rutherford, New Jersey, US *
17 – Rogers Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada ^
24 – FedExField, Landover, Maryland, US ^

JULY 2023
01 – Gillette Stadium, Foxborough, Massachusetts, US ^
08 – Acrisure Stadium, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, US ^
15 – Ford Field, Detroit, Michigan, US ^
22 – Nissan Stadium, Nashville, Tennessee, US @
29 – Soldier Field, Chicago, Illinois, US @

AUGUST 2023
05 – GEHA Field at Arrowhead Stadium, Kansas City, Missouri, US @
12 – U.S. Bank Stadium, Minneapolis, Minnesota, US @
19 – Empower Field at Mile High, Denver, Colorado, US @
26 – Lumen Field, Seattle, Washington, US #

SEPTEMBER 2023
02 – BC Place, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada #
09 – Allegiant Stadium Russ, Las Vegas, Nevada, US +
16 – Levi’s® Stadium, Santa Clara, California, US +
23 – SoFi Stadium, Inglewood, California, US +

* = w/ Khalid and Dylan
^ = w/ Khalid and Rosa Linn
@ = w/ Khalid and Cat Burns
# = Khalid and Maisie Peters
+ = w/ Russ and Maisie Peters

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Cat Burns shares new songs ‘People Pleaser’ and ‘Sleep At Night’

Cat Burns has returned with two brand new songs – listen to ‘People Pleaser’ and ‘Sleep At Night’ below.

  • READ MORE: Cat Burns: uplifting songwriter that wants to “help Black queer artists” tell their story

The singer and NME 100 alumni released debut EP ‘Emotionally Unavailable’ earlier this year, and followed that up with ‘Go’, a collaboration with Sam Smith.

Discussing the first of the new songs, ‘People Pleaser’, Burns said: “‘People Pleaser’ is what it says on the tin, my struggles with being a people pleaser and why I am one.”

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Of ‘Sleep At Night’, she added: “’Sleep At Night’ is a really personal song for me; it’s about being deeply hurt and wronged by someone but deciding to take the high road and not say anything bad about them because you’re a good person.”

Listen to both new tracks below.

Earlier this week, Burns was revealed as one of a number of support acts set to join Ed Sheeran on his huge 2023 North American ‘Mathematics’ tour.

The pop star will bring his ongoing world tour to the US and Canada next year, with support from Burns alongside Khalid, Dylan, Rosa Linn, Maisie Peters and Russ on differing dates. Tickets go on general sale here next Friday (October 14) at 10am PT (6pm BST).

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Speaking to NME for a Radar interview earlier this year, Burns said she wants to “help Black queer artists” tell their story.

She said: “I think I’m part of a wave of LGBTQ+ artists that are encouraging others to be more open. We’re singing about more complex things within the themes of love and relationships, such as dating someone who’s not out yet.

“A lot of artists have started to become more comfortable telling those important stories, both lyrically and visually, which has allowed me to be more open. Personally, I want to help Black queer artists to be like, ‘OK, let me tell my truth, too.’”

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Ian Brown dedicates Manchester gig to the late Paul Ryder

Ian Brown played a homecoming Manchester gig this weekend (September 30), and dedicated the set to late Happy Mondays bassist Paul Ryder.

Brown is currently on his first UK headline tour in a decade, and played the O2 Victoria Warehouse in his hometown on Friday night.

As reported by the Manchester Evening News, Brown told the crowd: “I just want to dedicate tonight’s set to one of the greatest human beings I ever met. Let’s hear it for Mr Paul Ryder.”

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Ryder passed away on July 15 at the age of 58. In a statement, his surviving bandmates described him as “a true pioneer and legend” who will be “forever missed”.

Earlier this summer, Happy Mondays released a new EP, ‘Tart Tart’, in tribute to their late bassist, while Echo and The Bunnymen’s Ian McCulloch sung at Ryder’s funeral. Others paying their respects at the funeral included Brown, Happy Mondays bandmate Bez and former New Order and Joy Division bass player Peter Hook.

Ian Brown
Ian Brown CREDIT: Adela Loconte/WireImage

Elsewhere during the Manchester gig, Brown took a pop at journalists’ responses to the controversial reaction to his tour opener in Leeds last month. “Are there any journalists in tonight?” he asked. “There shouldn’t be because I’ve banned them all. No snakes in my place.”

Following the show at Leeds’ O2 Academy, fans shared their anger after the Stone Roses singer played his sold out big with no band, with some likening the performance to “karaoke”.

One attendee in Leeds described the show as Brown “[doing] karaoke and [butchering] his own tunes,” adding: “Gutted to see Ian Brown turn up to his £40 a ticket, sold out gig at leeds tonight WITH NO BAND.

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“I’m a life long fan but it was bad. Ian Brown does karaoke and butchers his own tunes. Most were too pissed to care but I had to get out after this one.”

At a subsequent Glasgow gig – the second show on the tour – Brown stopped a song midway through to indirectly reference the criticism, and say that he believed everyone at the Leeds show was having a great time.

“Last night we played in Leeds,” he told the crowd, “and all there was was hands in the air, all the way to the back.”

Brown’s headline tour continues tonight (October 3) at Birmingham’s O2 Academy. See the remaining dates on the tour below and pick up tickets here.

OCTOBER 2022
3 – Birmingham, O2 Academy
4 – Bournemouth, O2 Academy
6 – Nottingham, Rock City
7 – London, O2 Academy Brixton

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Eminem becomes one step away from EGOT status following Emmy win

Eminem has won a Creative Arts Emmy Award, taking him one step closer to becoming an EGOT winner.

The star was part of an ensemble that performed at the Superbowl Halftime Show earlier this year alongside Dr. Dre, Kendrick Lamar, Snoop Dogg, Mary J. Blige, 50 Cent and Anderson .Paak, which won three prizes at the ceremony over the weekend.

  • READ MORE: Eminem: Rank The Albums – will the best Slim Shady album please stand up?

These included Variety Special (live), Outstanding Music Direction, and Outstanding Production Design For A Variety Special.

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As such, Eminem now has an Emmy to his name alongside 15 Grammy Awards and an Oscar for Original Song for his song ‘Lose Yourself’ in 8 Mile. He would need a Tony to complete the set and join a small number of people to win all four awards.

Eminem
Eminem CREDIT: Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

The Creative Arts Emmys also awarded Adele for her One Night Only special, also taking her one step away from EGOT status.

Responding to her win, the singer said on Instagram: “Bloody hell I’m pleased as punch! Thank you @mrbenwinston for dropping this round to me this afternoon!! Trust me to officially have an EGO [cry laughing emoji].

“Thank you so much @televisionacad , I’m so so honored to receive this. Big up to everyone involved. @griffithobservatory thank you for letting me sing up on your mountain and big love to all the other nominees x”.

Adele performing at Hyde Park
Adele performing at Hyde Park. Credit: Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images

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Other winners at the awards included Peter Jackson’s Disney+ docuseries The Beatles: Get Back, which took home five awards, while Lizzo’s Watch Out For The Big Grrrls won two awards.

Meanwhile, last weekend Eminem teamed up with Snoop Dogg at the MTV VMAs for a special “metaverse-inspired” performance of their recent collaboration ‘From The D 2 The LBC’.

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Russian Eurovision star subject to online smear campaign over opposition to Ukraine war

A singer who represented Russia in the Eurovision Song Contest has become the subject of an online smear campaign over her opposition to the war in Ukraine.

  • READ MORE: Ukrainian Eurovision entry Kalush Orchestra: “This is the highest responsibility possible”

Manizha Sangin — who placed ninth in the international music competition last year — has long been an outspoken critic of the invasion. In February, she shared an Instagram post calling the war a “fraternal conflict” that goes “against the will” of Russian people, and later released a song called ‘Soldier’ which contained the repeated lyric, “Stop the war”.

Now, Sangin’s critics have launched a coordinated campaign to have the singer blacklisted in Russia. According to BBC, Sangin’s management team and promoters have received “many threats”, particularly in reference to the singer’s scheduled performance at the Aleksandrovskaya Fortress festival in September.

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The festival, which celebrates the Cossack culture of Ukraine and southern Russia, was referenced in a post on the messaging platform Telegram. The post shared the phone number and address of the festival’s organisers, and urged users to “write in” and “demand to cancel the performance of Manizha”.

Aleksandrovskaya Fortress organisers confirmed that they “did indeed receive a significant amount of negative emails and calls” regarding Sangin, but committed to keep the singer on the festival bill since her stance on peace “is what our festival is ultimately about”.

While Sangin retained her place at Aleksandrovskaya Fortress despite the online campaign, the singer was elsewhere removed from the line-up of two separate Russian music events: the Stereoleto Festival in Saint Petersburg and an event at the Glavclub nightclub in Moscow.

Meanwhile, Russian magazine Sobaka.ru this week pulled their cover story on Sangin, in line with her inclusion on an unofficial list of “blacklisted artists” which circulated among Russian media companies in June.

A spokesperson for Sangin, whose fiancé is half-Ukrainian, said that the source of the smear campaigns is unknown, but suggested that they may have been led by those intolerant of Sangin’s birthplace of Tajikistan. The spokesperson also said that the campaigns may have been perpetrated by “people who support the special military campaign in Ukraine”.

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“Of course there are fears”, Sangin’s spokesperson added, “but she would like to continue to work and live in Russia”.

Sangin competed at last year’s Eurovision contest, where she scored 204 points for her performance of her own song titled ‘Russian Woman’. The song’s lyrics were criticised by some Russian bodies for inspiring “hatred towards men’, but the country’s Investigative Committee later found that ‘Russian Woman’ contained no “illegal statements”.

The news comes after the winners of this year’s contest — the Ukrainian rap group Kalush Orchestra — auctioned off their Eurovision trophy in May, to raise funds to buy drones for Ukraine’s ongoing war against Russia.

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Reverend & The Makers return with new single ‘Heatwave In The Cold North’

Reverend & The Makers have returned with a new single called ‘Heatwave In The Cold North’ – check it out below.

  • READ MORE: Reverend & The Makers’ Jon McClure talks Corbyn, taking on the Tories and their new album

The new track is the band’s first new music in five years, and first taster of an upcoming seventh studio album.

Frontman Jon McClure described ‘Heatwave In The Cold North’ as being about “lazing around on a sunny day with your lover getting stoned.

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“Imagine if Barry White lived in Sheffield and you’re getting there,” he added.

Listen to ‘Heatwave In The Cold North’, the first new music from Reverend & The Makers since 2017’s ‘The Death Of A King’ album, below.

Last year, the band’s Laura McClure responded to comments that her group is a “lad band”, pointing out that she’s often treated as lesser than her bandmates because of her gender.

The keyboardist, trumpeter and vocalist has performed on all six of Reverend & The Makers’ studio albums – most recently ‘The Death Of A King’.

In a statement posted to the band’s social media, McClure said: “I am tired of explaining I’ve been in the band from the beginning, tired of saying ‘no, we’re not a lad band’, tired of making people see girls don’t always have to be the lead singers, tired of girls not being recognised as members of the band even when they’ve been in the same band for 15 fucking years…

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Last Christmas, frontman Jon offered free virtual gigs to fans who will be alone on Christmas Day. “I don’t like the idea that people will be alone at this time of year,” McClure explained in the video. “Especially during a pandemic.”

It followed the success of 2020’s festive broadcast, where many had to spend Christmas alone due to lockdown rules.

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Bob Dylan’s legal team reportedly seeking “monetary sanctions” following dropped sexual abuse lawsuit

Content warning: This story contains descriptions of alleged sexual abuse.

Bob Dylan‘s legal team are reportedly calling for “monetary sanctions” against the lawyers behind a dropped sexual abuse lawsuit levelled at the singer.

The lawsuit, which was filed in August last year, accused Dylan of assault, battery, false imprisonment and infliction of emotional distress. The plaintiff alleged that Dylan had “befriended and established an emotional connection” with her over a six-week period in 1965, when she was 12-years-old and Dylan was in his mid-20s.

She claimed he had plied her with drugs and alcohol, before sexually abusing her in his room in Manhattan’s Chelsea Hotel. Dylan denied the claim at the time, with a representative saying the claim was “untrue” and would be “vigorously defended”.

The lawsuit was dropped last month, after Dylan’s lawyers accused the plaintiff of destroying evidence by failing to provide emails and text messages about case by the court-ordered deadline. In a statement provided to NME at the time, Dylan’s lead attorney, Orin Snyder of Gibson Dunn, described the suit as “a lawyer-driven sham”.

As reported by Billboard and Pitchfork, Dylan’s team have since moved to demand “real consequences” for the plaintiff’s lawyers, Daniel W. Isaacs and Peter J. Gleason.

“Mr. Isaacs and Mr. Gleason should not have brought this action — accusing defendant of a heinous crime — if they did not intend to responsibly litigate it,” Snyder wrote in a letter to a federal judge. “It is more than appropriate to hold them accountable.”

He accused the pair of “brazen discovery misconduct”, saying they “failed to produce documents they should have possessed and reviewed before ever bringing this lawsuit in the first place.”

“As we said in open court last week, many of the documents we have seen, including scores of emails between Plaintiff and key third parties whom counsel apparently never even bothered to interview, undermine and contradict Plaintiff’s allegations,” he wrote.

As per Billboard, Isaacs issued a response on August 9, writing that the case was “brought in good faith and with the intent of responsibility litigating the matter.” He said that his client had refused to hand over key materials “despite my repeated requests”, adding “at no point did either Mr. Gleason or I willfully withhold discovery or engage in discovery misconduct.”

“We attempted to comply as best we could given the circumstances, including plaintiff suffering PTSD, which was exacerbated when her identity was illegally made public following the commencement of this action.”

NME has reached out to Snyder, Gleason and Isaacs for comment.

Dylan’s team initially called the case “a brazen shakedown masquerading as a lawsuit” when it was filed last year. At the time, rock historians, including Dylan’s biographer Clinton Heylin, cast doubt over the alleged timeline of events, saying that the singer had been touring England during that period.

The plaintiff later amended the time frame from April 1965 to a “period of several months in the spring” of that year.

For help, advice or more information regarding sexual harassment, assault and rape in the UK, visit the Rape Crisis charity website. In the US, visit RAINN.

For help, advice or more information regarding sexual harassment, assault and rape in the UK, visit the Rape Crisis charity website. In the US, visit RAINN.

For help, advice or more information regarding sexual harassment, assault and rape in the UK, visit the Rape Crisis charity website. In the US, visit RAINN.

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Gary Powell on The Libertines’ new album: “We’re not going to reinvent the wheel, but we can push the boat out a little more”

Gary Powell has spoken to NME about his forthcoming ‘The Steam Packet UK Tour’, as well as providing an update on The Libertines‘ long-awaited fourth album.

The tour will see The Libertines drummer showcase acts from his 25 Hour Convenience Store indie label and will be headlined by raucous Southampton garage-rockers Dead Freights, with support from fellow stablemates Casino, Bear Park and Young Culture. Powell, along with his label partner, former Factory Records managing director Eric Langley, said he wants his imprint to be there for the artists who believe their voice cannot be heard.

“The label has always stood for one thing, which is I’m really anti the direction that the industry takes in regard to whom they should sign,” he said. “It’s led by what’s in vogue at that particular moment in time – a band has to have a particular look and sound – but that’s nonsense, and A&R-ing should come from the fact you hear something in a band, regardless of how popular they are. I’m more interested in attitude than numbers.”

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Powell said he wants 25 Hour Convenience Store to be different from current record labels, which he feels prize streaming numbers over headhunting nascent talent and was inspired by the chance legendary Rough Trade A&R James Endeacott took on signing The Libertines in 2001.

“A perfect example would be James, who came to see us play at the Rhythm Factory, off Whitechapel Road. I didn’t have any drums – I managed to wangle the worst kit off a friend of [co-frontman] Pete [Doherty] and Carl [Barât]’s, and Carl broke a guitar string during the first track we played, and we had to stop the gig for 25 minutes until he could find another one and carry on,” he remembered.

“But James heard something in us. Now what happens is an A&R just looks at how full the room is and applauds, ‘I’ve found the next best thing’. That isn’t identifying talent – that’s just catching onto something people already know is good.”

‘The Steam Packet UK Tour’, which kicks off in Birmingham on October 7, is set to coincide with the release of Dead Freights’ EP ‘Missed World’ in the autumn, produced by Powell in his Albion Rooms studio.

Praising his flagship signing, he said: “They have their own energy and integrity. The singer Charlie [James] is an amazing lyricist and musician, and he and [guitarist Robert] Franklin come up with the majority of the ideas musically but ensure they encompass the ideas of the rest of the band. They’re not a stereotypically frontman-led band, they have their own unique dynamic, and everybody on that stage puts on a show.”

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Powell recently took Dead Freights on tour as a support act for a number of dates on The Libertines’ ‘Up the Bracket’  20th anniversary shows, with backstage footage from the Bristol gig showing Charlie James duetting with Pete Doherty on an acoustic rendition of The Beatles’ ‘I Will’.

“We had a great time hanging out together on tour, and I think Pete and Carl loved watching the band perform as well. There was an aspect of seeing the guys play and listening to them and watching them hang out, which brought back what it was like for us in our early days as well when we toured with Supergrass. We were the Dead Freights at that particular point in time.”

Although recent gigs have formed part of The Libertines’ 20th-anniversary celebrations of their debut ‘Up the Bracket’ – which will also see them release a ‘Super Deluxe Edition’ of the record in October – Powell is more interested in forging forward and said he wants to have the new Libertines album out next year.

“My mind is more in line with the opportunity to record a new album than anything regarding 20 years ago,” he said. “We’ve been playing the majority of the album [‘Up the Bracket’] for 20 years now, so this year for me, is a great opportunity to draw a line under this part of the saga and move on to the next phase.”

The Libertines
The Libertines. CREDIT: Roger Sargent

Discussing the progress of the follow-up to 2015’s ‘Anthems For Doomed Youth’, Powell elaborated: “The good thing is everybody’s been writing. I’m hoping there’s going to be a whole new fervour and interesting dimension added to how we approach things. Obviously, we’re not going to try and reinvent the wheel and be like Depeche Mode going from rock ‘n’ roll to electronic, but I think we can push the boat out a little more while still bringing something that has the same emotional integrity and dynamism that the audience craves when they come to a Libertines show.”

Previously, Pete Doherty confirmed to NME that writing sessions in Jamaica were tentatively scheduled and revealed the record would have an eclectic range of styles similar to The Clash’s ‘Sandinista!’

“‘Sandinista!’-esque was definitely one approach we were thinking of,” echoed Powell, before adding that he was interested in what the concept of Albion would sound like in 2022. “But I also think it’s time we grappled hold of the 21st century as well and reflected where we are in the world right now. Nobody’s putting down their phones or dumping their social media, but they’re also looking back into the past for their creative needs.

“I think we could easily combine the two things together to create something interesting – bearing in mind it was Peter who pretty much started the idea of the band and the general public having a social media platform.”

He continued: “I remember asking John [Hassall, Libs bassist] once: ‘If The Beatles were around now, what would they sound like?’. John’s answer was ‘Sgt. Pepper….’ Of course they wouldn’t! If the Beatles were around now, they’d probably sound like garage, grime, mixed with an orchestra with a slight James Blake-esque twist. They wouldn’t sound like ‘Sgt. Pepper’; The Beatles were continually evolving.”

“So the question is: how do we turn ‘Don’t Look Back into the Sun’ 2003 into ‘Don’t Look Back into the Sun’ 2022? How do we approach it where we maintain our musical integrity but bring an added element that reflects the modernity of the world we’re in right now?”

Tickets for October’s ‘The Steam Packet UK’ tour are available here. Check out the full list of dates below:

OCTOBER 2022

07 – Birmingham –The Rainbow
08 – Liverpool – EBGBS
15 – Newcastle – Head of Steam
21 – London – Sebright Arms
26 – Southampton – Joiners Arms

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Sam Fender opens up about who might play him in a biopic

Sam Fender has opened up about who might play him in a biopic of his life.

  • READ MORE: Sam Fender live in London: a special celebration of the Geordie star’s heroic ascent

Speaking to The Sun, Fender said he would like to see Evan Peters from American Horror Story play him if a film was ever made of his life.

He told the publication: “Who would I want, compared to who would actually play us, is probably very different.

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“I’d want that kid who stars in American Horror Story, Evan Peters. That’s who I would want to play me, but I’m not that cool or sexy. I’d want him playing me because he’s got that kind of dead look behind his eyes that I’ve got.”

He went on to joke that “in reality they’d probably get Michael Cera.”

Evan Peters
Sam Fender said he’d like Evan Peters (above) to play him in a biopic of his life – CREDIT: Getty

Last weekend, Fender gave his new single ‘Alright’ its live debut at his huge Finsbury Park gig.

The singer-songwriter played the biggest gig of his career to date last Friday night (July 15) at the North London venue, where he was joined by Fontaines D.C., Declan McKenna and Beabadoobee among others.

At the show, Fender played a host of tracks from his albums ‘Seventeen Going Under’ and ‘Hypersonic Missiles’, as well as giving ‘Alright’ – a song shared last week and an off-cut from the ‘Seventeen Going Under Sessions’ – its live debut.

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Reviewing the Finsbury Park gig, NME wrote: “For the most part, tonight is a triumph – made resoundingly clear in its final throes. ‘This song went much further than we ever imagined it would do and that was all down to you so thank you so much,’ Fender says by way of introduction for the penultimate, rousing version of ‘Seventeen Going Under’.

“As its first guitar chimes ripple over the crowd, the audience responds by setting off so many flares, the air in the park becomes thick with smoke and the scent of burning chemicals. It might be a hugely anthemic moment in the set, but it’s also one that’s massively emotional – the tens of thousands of people roaring along to its chanting vocals feel like a victory in the face of the dark times the lyrics document.”

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Beabadoobee announces North American ‘Beatopia’ tour dates

Beabadoobee has announced a slew of North American tour dates for later in the year in support of her newly-released second album, ‘Beatopia’.

  • READ MORE: Beabadoobee – ‘Beatopia’ review: a weightless journey through a dreamlike world

Following US dates supporting Bleachers, festival appearances in Europe and Japan, and tours in Australia and the UK, Beabadoobee will kick off her North American headline run in late October, with dates running through to early December.

Support on the tour will come from Beabadoobee’s Dirty Hit labelmates, Lowertown. The duo released their latest EP, ‘The Gaping Mouth’, last year. See a full list of tour dates below – tickets are on sale this Friday (July 22), at 10am local time.

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‘Beatopia’, the follow-up to Beabadoobee’s 2020 debut LP ‘Fake It Flowers’, was released last Friday (July 15). Four singles were released prior to the album coming out: ‘Talk’, ‘See You Soon’, ‘Lovesong’ and ’10:36′. In a four-star review of ‘Beatopia’, NME said that the album saw “the seeds that were planted in ‘Fake It Flowers’ not only blossom, but inhabit an entirely different world”.

Speaking to NME during a backstage interview at Glastonbury 2022 last month, the singer-songwriter elaborated on the childhood “dream world” behind the album’s concept. “It was much more of a physical thing when I was seven,” she said.

“I thought I could literally be in this world – I think it was just a way of escaping everything that was happening in life at that time, and then I forgot about it because shit happened. Then I just realised that I could finally accept it now and I could make a whole album about it and find myself within it.”

Beabadoobee’s ‘Beatopia’ US tour dates are: 

OCTOBER
Tuesday 25 – Washington D.C., 9:30 Club
Friday 28 – Brooklyn NY, Brooklyn Steel
Saturday 29 – Philadelphia PA, Union Transfer
Monday 31 – Atlanta Ga, Variety Playhouse

NOVEMBER
Tuesday 1 – Jacksonville FL, Underbelly

Wednesday 2 – St. Petersburg FL, Jannus Landing
Thursday 3 – Orlando FL, Beacham Theater
Friday 4 – New Orleans LA, Republic NOLA
Sunday 6 – Houston TX, White Oak Music Hall
Monday 7 – Dallas TX, Granada Theater
Tuesday 8 – Austin TX, Emo’s
Thursday 10 – Albuquerque NM, Sunshine Theater
Friday 11 – Phoenix AZ, The Van Buren
Saturday 12 – Los Angeles CA, The Novo
Monday 14 – Santa Ana CA, The Observatory
Tuesday 15 – San Francisco CA, Regency Ballroom
Saturday 19 – Mexico City, Corona Capital
Monday 21 – Seattle WA, Moore Theater
Tuesday 22 – Vancouver BC, Commodore Ballroom
Wednesday 23 – Portland OR, Roseland Theater
Friday 25 – Salt Lake City UT, The Depot
Saturday 26 – Denver CO, Summit Music Hall
Monday 28 – Minneapolis MN, First Avenue
Tuesday 29 – Chicago IL, Riviera Theatre

DECEMBER
Thursday 1 – Toronto, History
Friday 2 – Montreal, Club Soda
Saturday 3 – Albany NY, Empire Live
Sunday 4 – Boston MA, Roadrunner

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Arthur Russell Calling Out Of Context / Instrumentals (reissues, 2004, 2017)

Thirty years after his Aids-related death, aged just 40, Arthur Russell’s music still has a luminous freshness and richly emotional power. The cult composer, cellist and downtown New York scene-hopper amassed a vast body of work spanning avant-classical chamber pieces, disco and dub, experimental electronica, folksy Americana and Buddhist bubblegum pop, but he released very little solo material in his lifetime. Russell’s radical queerness and genre-blurring musical promiscuity confounded peers and record labels, but he also stifled his own potential with painstaking perfectionism, endlessly hoarding and reworking pieces that deserved a public airing.

  • ORDER NOW: The Beatles are on the cover of the latest issue of Uncut

Russell’s posthumous reputation has blossomed over the last two decades, his legacy celebrated in books and films, his songs sampled by Kanye West and covered by Tracey Thorn, Hot Chip, Sufjan Stevens and more. This resurgence is largely thanks to the meticulous efforts of his former partner Tom Lee, designer Melissa Zhao Jones and Steve Knutson, boss of Portland-based boutique label Audika, who have assembled an ongoing series of mostly glorious anthologies excavated from Russell’s massive tape archive. In partnership with Rough Trade, these Audika albums are finally receiving a full physical launch in Europe.

First released in 2004, Calling Out Of Context became a key early stepping stone in Russell’s critical rediscovery and wider dissemination to a new, younger audience. Lovingly packaged and curated, it combines tracks from his unreleased 1985 album Corn alongside archive material that he spent years honing for a long-promised, forever-delayed release on Rough Trade. As an entry point into Russell’s sprawling canon, the music is impressively high calibre but hardly comprehensive, emphasising his art-pop singer-songwriter side over his club-friendly or contemporary classical work. That said, these slippery compositions still range freely across genres, inventing a few new ones along the way.

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Cautiously embracing the dominant new wave and electro-pop aesthetic of the era, Russell deploys drum machines and synthesisers alongside regular human collaborators including trombone/keyboard player Peter Zummo and percussionist Mustafa Khaliq Ahmed. But like almost everything he recorded, these semi-mechanised tunes also feel warmly organic, soulful and sensual, with an emphatically human heartbeat. There is a seductive smalltown sweetness to Russell’s airy narcotic reveries, his stream-of-consciousness lyrics peppered with nostalgic yearning for the wide-open skies and lakes of his Iowa childhood, notably on the deliciously woozy “That’s Us/Wild Combination”. He radiates boyish innocence, even when hymning his carnal intoxication with sex in the serotonin-drenched funk-pop earworm “Get Around To It”.

On “Calling Out Of Context” itself, with its bustling urban-tropical percussion and jittery art-rock jangle, Russell stakes a claim in the avant-world terrain explored by his New York contemporaries and sometime collaborators Talking Heads. The skeletal lo-fi Toytown disco-pop of “Make 1, 2” and infectiously weird “Hop On Down”, a slinky sunshine groove punctuated by bursts of electromagnetic crackle, could almost be Prince at his most experimental. The fact that Russell envisaged both as possible singles shows just how forward-thinking he was, or perhaps how gloriously unmoored from commercial reality.

Heard through 21st-century ears, it is striking just how contemporary much of this music sounds almost 40 years later. With their hypnotic machine rhythms, drones and throbs and loopy vocal ripples,“The Platform On The Ocean” or “Calling All Kids” feel like prescient blueprints for Radiohead’s mid-career post-rock rebirth. Meanwhile wafting, weightless, loose-limbed dream-funk confections like “You And Me Both” or “Arm Around You” could easily be the work of some hip millennial electro-soul soundscaper on XL or Erased Tapes.

Drawn from live work-in-progress performances spanning 1975 to 1978, Instrumentals first appeared in botched and truncated form in 1984. It took another 33 years before Audika unveiled this expanded, lovingly restored, double-album version in 2017. The project has esoteric roots: inspired by the photography of his Buddhist teacher, Yuko Nonomura, Russell had an epiphany that opened his ears to the magical, transcendent power of American bubblegum and easy-listening music. The untitled compositions spanningVolume 1are mostly mellifluous lo-fi chamber-pop pieces steeped in wide-eyed Americana, their bluegrass twang and jug-band honk overlaid with crackle and feedback and dubby dissolves. There are echoes of Copeland and Ives, Gershwin and Bernstein here, but also Brian Wilson and Beirut’s Zach Condon.

Volume 2 of Instrumentals consists of a more polished, expansive, symphonic piece played by the Brooklyn Philharmonic’s CETA orchestra, a gorgeous pastoral sound-painting couched in silken strings and mournful brassy fanfares. The conductor is Julius Eastman, another overlooked queer polymath on the fringes of New York’s 1970s minimalism scene. Rounding off this selection are two of Russell’s most uncompromising sonic experiments, both recorded live in 1975. “Sketch For The Face Of Helen” is a musique concrète collage of drones, analogue electronics and the sampled roar of a Hudson river tugboat, while the proto-ambient tone poem “Reach One” features two Fender Rhodes pianos engaged in a drowsy, gently ebbing dialogue.

Fastidious listeners might nit-pick a few repetitions, audio glitches and overstretched ideas across these albums. But as an overall listening experience they are voluptuous, immersive and soul-soothing. Russell’s spellbinding music seems to float in its own beatific glow, always generous, never demanding, forever fluid, rarely fixed. There are whole continents of sound contained in these two collections alone that a curious explorer might easily get lost inside, perhaps never to emerge again.

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Barbara Keith Barbara Keith

When Barbara Keith, acoustic in hand, headed from Massachusetts to Greenwich Village during the height of the folk era, she became one of countless aspiring troubadours tentatively following in Dylan’s footsteps, singing folk standards at Café Wha? and Gerde’s Folk City. She fell in with a bunch of Café Wha? regulars, and they formed the short-lived band Kangaroo. By the time they’d scored a record deal, Keith was starting to write songs, and soon after the group dissolved, she was signed by MGM/Verve, with Peter Asher assigned to produce her self-titled 1969 debut album. Although the LP caused barely a ripple, several labels saw enough promise in the youngster to keep tabs on her.

  • ORDER NOW: The Beatles are on the cover of the latest issue of Uncut

During a brief fling with A&M in 1970, Keith had her first taste of success when her song “Free The People” was covered by Delaney & Bonnie and Barbra Streisand, dramatically increasing her visibility. Before long she was auditioning for Columbia chief Clive Davis and Warner/Reprise Chairman Mo Ostin, who personally signed Keith to a three-album deal. Producer/A&R rep Larry Marks (Gene Clark, Phil Ochs, The Flying Burrito Brothers), who’d become her co-manager, got the job of helming her LP, and his first move was recruiting the very best musicians in LA to play on it.

Ostin had signed Keith at the perfect time – or so it seemed to the Warners brass on her arrival in 1972. Joni Mitchell had just jumped to Asylum and Bonnie Raitt was just getting started, so there was a void to be filled, and the 26-year-old Keith appeared to have the goods to become Mitchell’s heir apparent. She’d grown exponentially as a songwriter and had matured into a strikingly original singer, the urgency of her delivery further enlivened by her “hummingbird” vibrato, as one critic described it. But what most distinguished Keith from her contemporaries was her utter fearlessness, which was apparent from the opening notes of the second LP bearing her name.

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Who in their right mind would dare cover Dylan’s “All Along The Watchtower” after Jimi Hendrix had made it monumentally, indelibly his own? Keith didn’t just cover it, she opened the album with it, her feral vocal powering through a gauntlet formed by John Brennan’s galloping acoustic, Lee Sklar’s rumbling bassline and David Cohen’s pecking wah-wah licks. By the time Jim Keltner joins the fray, the performance has attained a sinewy ferocity. “…Watchtower”, like the bulk of the LP, was cut live off the floor, as Marks skilfully matched the players with Keith’s songs. The austere ballad “Burn The Midnight Oil No More” contains nothing more than Sklar’s bass and Keith’s regal piano amid a gossamer Nick DeCaro string arrangement. At the other extreme are “Shining All Along”, which gets a full-bodied, Band-like treatment, as Lowell George, pianist Spooner Oldham, organist Mike Utley, drummer Jim Keltner, Sklar and percussionist Milt Holland wail away in sepia-toned bliss, and the vivid road anthem “Detroit Or Buffalo”, which climaxes with pedal-steel maestro Sneaky Pete Kleinow and George conjuring a gilded rhapsody out of steel cylinders sliding over strings.

A half century later, “Free The People”, with its secular-gospel uplift, seems rooted in the era of Nixon and Vietnam, in contrast to the timeless country-folk ballad “The Bramble And The Rose” and the rousing rock anthem “A Stone’s Throw Away”. Keith had co-written the latter song with Doug Tibbles, who’d recently abandoned a successful career as a sitcom scriptwriter to try his hand at drumming for a living. He was enlisted to keep the beat during rehearsals, and it wasn’t long before Tibbles and Keith fell madly in love, turning her priorities upside down. Soon after the album was completed, she returned her advance money and blithely walked away from a career filled with seemingly limitless potential. Reprise released Barbara Keith in 1973 with zero fanfare, and among the handful of people aware of the album’s existence were singers from Valerie Carter to Olivia Newton-John, who were delighted to cover its songs.

Keith and Tibbles spent a couple of decades in LA before eventually settling back in Massachusetts, where they raised two sons and, in 1998, when elder son John was 11, formed a family band, The Stone Coyotes. Early on, Elmore Leonard became a big fan, describing the band as “AC/DC meets Patsy Cline”. He used Keith’s lyrics in his 1999 novel Be Cool, which was released with a Stone Coyotes CD sampler, and took the band on a tour promoting the book. To date, they’ve filled 16 LPs and three EPs with songs penned by the prolific Keith, who’s as energised as ever at 76. If ever an artist’s story begged to be made into a biopic, it’s Barbara Keith’s topsy-turvy saga.

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Muna Are Holding Space For All Your Gay Feelings

By Sam Manzella

Muna knew they were onto something when they penned “Silk Chiffon.” They just didn’t realize that something was a queer cultural reset.

Speaking to MTV News via video call from separate locations, bandmates Katie Gavin, Josette Maskin, and Naomi McPherson are at once elated and exhausted. The Los Angeles-based synthpop trio have been putting their feelings to music together since they first met in college at the University of Southern California about eight years ago. That is precisely why Gavin, Muna’s lead singer and lyricist, thinks their meteoric rise to fame over the past year and a half feels so surreal.

“We’re in a kind of sweet spot,” she says, clutching one knee tightly to her chest. “I’ve had this awareness of like, this is a nice time in my life, and I want to be present for it, but we also kind of have to not be present because we have to be preparing for all the things we’re going to be doing.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fhyk9rchC2c

She’s not wrong. Muna have two studio albums and years of experience under their belt, but the band’s self-titled third record, out Friday (June 24), comes in the middle of their busiest stretch to date. They’ve toured on and off since the latter half of 2021, joining the likes of Kacey Musgraves and Phoebe Bridgers while simultaneously promoting their most anticipated record yet. They’ll hit the road again for an international headlining tour that will span the bulk of 2022. “It's hard to come up with anything to say other than, like, ‘Goddamn, we're grateful,’” says McPherson, a multi-instrumentalist and producer.

The invitation to join Musgraves’s tour arrived on the heels of the release of “Silk Chiffon,” a hooky, syrupy-sweet ode to sapphic love with featured vocals from Bridgers. “Silk,” as the band affectionately refers to it, quickly became one of Muna’s most recognizable bops, rivaling previous hits like 2019’s “Number One Fan,” an infectiously catchy self-love mantra, and 2020’s “Bodies,” a sultry dance-pop single they co-wrote with The Knocks.

“There’s something so special about ‘Silk,’” McPherson says. “Even from the beginning, we were like, ‘Oh my god, this is the end-credit theme song for a fucking movie that could have come out when we were young.’” The single’s star-studded music video — a campy, pastel-hued homage to the cult-classic ’90s film But I’m a Cheerleader courtesy of filmmaker Ally Pankiw, McPherson’s girlfriend — played into that association. It signaled a rosier new era for a band that had slowly but surely become synonymous with “sad soft pop songs for sissies.”

“Life’s so fun, life’s so fun / Got my miniskirt and my rollerblades on,” Gavin coos on the pre-chorus, inspiring a plethora of TikToks highlighting how utterly unrelatable it is. (Gavin herself has poked fun about having to belt those saccharine lyrics while Going Through It.) But McPherson says that’s the whole point of the song. “What if there was this queer, simple love song when we were, like, 12, 13 years old? How would that have changed our lives?” “Silk” encourages us to celebrate life’s joyful moments even as we contend with unprecedented waves of grief, political discord, and anti-LGBTQ+ animus. When you’re queer or trans, life is fun — and confusing, and terrifying, sometimes all at once.

Isaac Schneider

“Silk” also marked the band’s first new release since signing to Saddest Factory, Bridgers’s indie record label, last spring. Muna’s first and second albums, 2017’s About U and 2019’s Saves the World, were released under RCA, which signed the trio early in their career; come 2020, the group was unceremoniously dropped by the label.

It’s tempting to paint the major-label system as the villain in the overarching story of Muna. But that would be an oversimplification of a complicated truth, and Muna, the band and the album, are all about embracing life’s complexity. “I think people who have been a part of the majors system maybe haven't had as good of an experience as we have had,” says Maskin, a fellow multi-instrumentalist and producer. “But the same principle for why we signed to Saddest Factory applied when we signed to RCA. We want to sign with someone who believes in us and what we're doing and doesn't want to change that.”

Sonically speaking, Muna is fittingly eclectic. The bombastic “Solid” echoes the larger-than-life lyrics and synth-embellished sound of progressive-rock greats like Peter Gabriel or Phil Collins; “Anything But Me,” the album’s second single, boasts a galloping beat and rousing vibe evocative of Shania Twain. Upbeat bops like “Silk” and “What I Want” — a declarative dance-pop track about shamelessly partying “in the middle of a gay bar” — hit just as hard as, say, “Loose Garment,” a delicate but devastating meditation on heartbreak. You get the sense that Muna is no longer entertaining anybody’s attempts to pigeonhole their sound or brand. The trio’s music is stronger for it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=olo9MCKosAI

McPherson says the latter is one of their favorite songs off the record, citing both its lush soundscape and Gavin’s poignant metaphor in the chorus (“Used to wear my sadness like a choker / Yeah, it had me by the throat / Tonight I feel I’m draped in it like a loose garment / I just let it float”). “That lyric has always just been so lovely, and the melody is so cool,” they gush. “It just touched me from the first time I heard it.”

Gavin is partial to “Kind of Girl,” an introspective, guitar-driven ballad she calls “the heart of the record.” The song finds Gavin affirming her own capacity to grow and change. “Yeah, I like telling stories / But I don’t have to write them in ink / I could still change the end,” she realizes, crooning her heart out over country-pop instrumentals so earnest, it borders on cheesy. The fact that a queer woman sings it adds another dimension to the lyrics. It’s not uncommon for LGBTQ+ people to identify with different letters of the acronym at different points throughout our lives, or to label ourselves with terms that welcome fluctuation, such as genderfluid or bigender.

“It took me a really long time to figure out what was really true for me and who I am,” Gavin says. “And it can also be confusing when you're starting to speak that out loud. I have such a specific privilege as someone who has gotten to live through my twenties documenting my experiences in life through this band. It's also part of the reason I've been able to commit to growth and change. I don’t want to be telling the same sad story over and over again.”

The trio also dons full cowboy drag for the music video, something that was important to the group since McPherson, who sings backup vocals on the track, is nonbinary. It’s no gag-worthy gimmick, though: Muna’s drag-king alter egos are, and I cannot emphasize this enough, smokin’ hot. “We have a community of creative people around us who are also majority-queer, and who wanted to help us see through a vision and do drag kings in a way that wasn’t a schtick,” Gavin explains. “Having it be a fun day where we could complicate the song a little bit was really, really cool.”

“‘Kind of Girl’ is a mindset for sure,” adds McPherson. “And it’s a very nice mindset to return to.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JDOiWGAaT8E

So, yes, Muna reserves the right to evolve over time. But the band has one core value that will never change: their commitment to centering queerness.

Gavin says she had “explicit conversations” with McPherson and Maskin about being out when they began releasing music around 2014. Overt queerness carried a different weight back then, especially for emerging artists hoping to break into the mainstream. Muna chose to live openly anyway. “When we made that choice, we were thinking, ‘Hey, we're a really cool band. We like what we do. And we think it would be good representation for other queer people.’”

“No one's gonna write us into history or into our own narratives but ourselves,” adds Maskin. “So Muna will continue to be the greatest band in the world, giving you gay love songs to have your first kiss to.”

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Watch Kasabian take a late-night stroll in trippy ‘Chemicals’ video

Kasabian have shared the official video for their latest single ‘Chemicals’ – you can watch it below.

Released earlier this month, the track followed ‘ALYGATOR’ and ‘SCRIPTVRE’ in previewing the Leicester band’s upcoming seventh album ‘The Alchemist’s Euphoria’ – their first since the departure of ex-frontman Tom Meighan.

  • READ MORE: Kasabian talk ‘SCRIPTVRE’ and new album ‘The Alchemist’s Euphoria’: “This is a re-set”

Today (June 21), Serge Pizzorno and co. have dropped the trippy new visuals for their most recent track, which sees Kasabian’s newly-appointed lead singer taking a stroll through his hometown in the early hours.

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The clip, titled ‘Chemicals – 3:21am In Les-tah’, was directed by LOOSE (IDLES, Fred Again.., Joy Crookes) and filmed, as its name suggests, at 3:21am.

Speaking of the single, Pizzorno explained: “It is me telling myself that it is going to be OK. It was me seeing myself in those few weeks when everything kicked off [with Meighan’s exit].”

He continued: “It’s the future me saying to that person: ‘This is shit, but don’t worry, it will get better’. So having a song about talking to yourself is universal, I think. We all have to find a way to deal with the complications, the mess and the mortality of life.”

Meighan was fired from the band after being convicted of assaulting his then-girlfriend-now-wife, Vikki Ager, in 2020.

During an interview with NME last month, Pizzorno said that stepping into the role of frontman hasn’t altered his approach to songwriting. “I’ve always done it my way,” he explained. “If anything, it’s more fun in terms of being able to visualise the live show.”

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He went on: “When you see someone sing words that have come from them, there’s something magical about that. You can really feel the sentiment in what someone is trying to say through a charged performance. That’s when sparks fly.

“This album was just us saying, ‘Let’s see what we can do, let’s see where we can take this’. Every album we’ve made has been way different to the one previously and you’ve never really known where we’re going to go next.”

‘The Alchemist’s Euphoria’ arrives on August 5 via Columbia Records – you can pre-order it here.

Kasabian will showcase the record on their 2022 UK tour this October/November – find any remaining tickets here and see the full schedule below.

October
28 – Manchester, AO Arena
29 – London, Alexandra Palace

November
2 – Cardiff, Motorpoint Arena
4 – Birmingham, Utilita Arena

Last weekend saw Kasabian perform a headline set at Isle Of Wight Festival 2022, where they were joined onstage by their famous friend and fan Peter Crouch.

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Music superfan Big Jeff seriously injured in fire

Jeff ‘Big Jeff’ Johns – the beloved, gig-going Bristol music fan – has been seriously injured in a fire at his home.

A statement shared with NME earlier today (June 13) reads: “Jeff Johns, known to all as Big Jeff, has been very seriously injured in a fire at his home in Bristol. He is in a specialist burns unit in Swansea in a stable condition.

“His family have asked for people to keep Jeff in their thoughts and prayers at this very difficult time. His friends have set up a playlist on Spotify ‘Play a record for Big Jeff’.”

Jeff Johns is widely known as Bristol’s most frequent gig-goer, having attended live shows every night of the week at venues across the city before the UK lockdown was implemented back in March 2020. He is renowned for being a regular and enthusiastic attendee at thousands of shows around the region, and the UK.

Speaking to NME earlier this year during Independent Venue Week, Johns described gig spaces as “basically my churches”.

“They’ve been safe spaces for me for years,” he said. “You see communities you’ll never meet anywhere else. It’s not just the artists, they develop people who are going to go into running their own venues or record labels, music journalists, or people who go into stage tech and sound engineering.”

He continued: “You go somewhere like The Louisiana in Bristol or the Hebden Bridge Trades Club or The Boileroom in Guildford and you’ll meet an entire community.”

Last year, Johns launched his first ever art exhibition. Welcome To My World opened on February 3, featuring 34 paintings of the artists who have proved to be an inspiration, including folk singer Gaelynn Lea Tressler and the Bristol trumpeter Pete Judge.

Exhibition curator Lee Dodds said: “We have been working with Jeff for a couple of years now, after discovering his brilliant talent after he posted a photo of Raggs on Facebook. His paintings are uplifting and will definitely be popular with music fans and art collectors in Bristol and beyond.”

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Muse deliver fan favourites and rarities at charity Hammersmith show

Last night (Monday, May 9) saw Muse play the first of two special charity shows at London’s Eventim Apollo in Hammersmith. Check out photos, footage, the setlist and more below.

  • READ MORE: Global chaos? Corrupt politicians? Here’s why we need Muse more than ever

The Devon rock trio announced the gigs back in March, with money raised at the first show donated to War Child and Médecins Sans Frontières‘ relief efforts in Ukraine. The second show will celebrate the 30th anniversary of The Big Issue. This marked the band’s first major gigs of 2022 after playing an intimate comeback club show in Exeter last month.

Muse perform at the Eventim Apollo, Hammersmith – May 2022. Credit: Hans Peter Van Velthoven
Muse perform at the Eventim Apollo, Hammersmith – May 2022. Credit: Hans Peter Van Velthoven

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Taking to the stage with a simple but powerful light show rather than their usual theatrical stadium production, the band opened with ‘Won’t Stand Down‘, the lead single from upcoming ninth album ‘The Will Of The People‘. A run of singles followed with ‘Absolution‘ favourite ‘Hysteria’ (with the riff from AC/DC‘s ‘Back In Black’ tacked on to the end), ‘Pressure’ from 2018’s ‘Simulation Theory’, ‘Origin Of Symmetry‘ classic ‘Bliss’, and ‘Psycho’ from ‘Drones‘ all whipping the sold-out crowd into a frenzy before the band dropped a number of rarities.

Described by frontman Matt Bellamy as “back from the dead, from a weird B-side version”, the band then played the rocked-up ‘Grand Omega Bosses Edit’ of ‘Black Holes And Revelations‘ track ‘Assassin’ (which was the B-side to the ‘Knights Of Cydonia’ vinyl release) before the singer told the crowd: “This is the deepest of deep cuts. If anyone knows this, I’ll be very surprised”. They then performed the instrumental ‘The Gallery’ live for the first time ever since it appeared as a B-side for ‘Bliss’ in 2001 and later ‘The Hullabaloo Soundtrack’ in 2002.

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A rock-tinged version of recent single ‘Compliance‘ followed before an early airing of former set closer ‘Stockholm Syndrome’ (extended by incorporating the riff from Rage Against The Machine‘s ‘Calm Like A Bomb’). A run of crowd-pleasing stadium staples followed with the likes of ‘Starlight’, ‘Plug In Baby’ and ‘Supermassive Black Hole’. But the biggest fan reaction was saved for the sprawling ‘Origin Of Symmetry’ centrepiece ‘Citizen Erased’ and rallying cry closer of ‘The Resistance’ single ‘Uprising’.

Introducing ‘Citizen Erased’, Bellamy told the crowd: “We have missed you guys so much. It’s so great to be back here with you, sweating. We’re going to play this one for you, because we all know you love it.”

The band then returned for an encore of the rarely-played ‘Origin Of Symmetry’ favourite ‘Space Dementia’ (which saw Bellamy throw his guitar across the stage during the outro) and the standard ending of ‘Knights Of Cydonia’ before Bellamy thanked the crowd and paid tribute to the charities that the shows were in aid of.

Muse return to Hammersmith Apollo for a second show tonight and will be supported by Razorlight.

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A post shared by MUSE (@muse)

Muse played:

‘Won’t Stand Down’
‘Interlude’
‘Hysteria (with AC/DC’s ‘Back In Black’ riff outro)
‘Pressure’
‘Bliss’
‘Psycho’
‘Assassin’ (‘Grand Omega Bosses Edit’ version)
‘The Gallery’
‘Compliance’
‘Stockholm Syndrome’ (with Rage Against The Machine’s ‘Calm Like A Bomb’ riff outro)
‘Prelude’
‘Starlight’
‘Plug In Baby’
‘Citizen Erased’
‘Supermassive Black Hole’
‘Uprising’
Encore:
‘Space Dementia’
‘Knights Of Cydonia’

Muse will release ‘Will Of The People’ on August 26. Bellamy previously revealed what to expect from the record, telling fans: “A pandemic, new wars in Europe, massive protests and riots, an attempted insurrection, Western democracy wavering, rising authoritarianism, wildfires and natural disasters and the destabilisation of the global order all informed ‘Will Of The People’.”

Muse have announced details of new single 'Won't Stand Down'. Credit: Press
Muse, 2022. Credit: Press

He added: “This album goes from metal all the way to pop to my first version to an Adele song… a lot of electronica.” he added. “We produced it ourselves. We were analysing everything we’ve done to date. The last song on the album is called ‘We Are Fucking Fucked’. I’m really happy and proud of it. I genuinely think it’s our best album.”

  • READ MORE: Matt Bellamy tells us about going solo, Muse’s next move and “embracing the simple life” of lockdown

Alongside a long summer of festival appearances – including Mallorca Live, Mad Cool, and Andalucia Big Festival, Muse will headline the Isle of Wight Festival in June alongside Lewis Capaldi and Kasabian, with tickets available here.

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Madonna announces new career-spanning compilation to celebrate dance chart milestone

Madonna has announced details of ‘Finally Enough Love’, a new compilation celebrating the singer’s record 50 chart-topping hits on the Billboard Dance Club Songs chart.

Madonna’s 2019 track ‘I Don’t Search I Find’, which featured on her ‘Madame X’ album, earned the artist her 50th number one on the Dance Club Songs chart in the US back in February 2020.

  • READ MORE: The story of NME in 70 (mostly) seminal songs

The achievement made Madonna the first and only artist with 50 number ones on any single Billboard chart.

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Madonna is now set to further celebrate that success by releasing the career-spanning ‘Finally Enough Love’ collection digitally on June 24, before a physical release follows on August 19. Pre-order is available now from here and here.

The forthcoming two versions of ‘Finally Enough Love’, a 50-song rundown of Madonna’s Dance Club hits (excluding 1987’s ‘Causing A Commotion’) and an abridged 16-track version, will be the first album releases to be part of the partnership between Madonna and Warner Music Group which was announced back in August.

Both compilations have been curated by Madonna, with the 50-track ‘Finally Enough Love: 50 Number Ones’ including her favourite remixes of those chart-topping dance hits from across four decades, such as ‘Music’, ‘Like A Prayer’ and ‘Into The Groove’ (which you can hear above).

You can see the full tracklist for ‘Finally Enough Love: 50 Number Ones’ below.

  1. ‘Holiday’ (7” Version)
  2. ‘Like A Virgin’ (7” Version)
  3. ‘Material Girl’ (7” Version)
  4. ‘Into The Groove’ (You Can Dance Remix Edit)
  5. ‘Open Your Heart’ (Video Version)
  6. ‘Physical Attraction’ (You Can Dance Remix Edit)
  7. ‘Everybody’ (You Can Dance Remix Edit)
  8. ‘Like A Prayer’ (Remix/Edit)
  9. ‘Express Yourself’ (Remix/Edit)
  10. ‘Keep It Together’ (Alternate Single Remix)
  11. ‘Vogue’ (Single Version)
  12. ‘Justify My Love’ (Orbit Edit)
  13. ‘Erotica’ (Underground Club Mix)
  14. ‘Deeper And Deeper’ (David’s Radio Edit)
  15. ‘Fever’ (Radio Edit)
  16. ‘Secret’ (Junior’s Luscious Single Mix)
  17. ‘Bedtime Story’ (Junior’s Single Mix)
  18. ‘Don’t Cry For Me Argentina’ (Miami Mix Edit)
  19. ‘Frozen’ (Extended Club Mix Edit)
  20. ‘Ray Of Light’ (Sasha Ultra Violet Mix Edit)
  21. ‘Nothing Really Matters’ (Club 69 Radio Mix)
  22. ‘Beautiful Stranger’ (Calderone Radio Mix)
  23. ‘American Pie’ (Richard ‘Humpty’ Vission Radio Mix)
  24. ‘Music’ (Deep Dish Dot Com Radio Edit)
  25. ‘Don’t Tell Me’ (Thunderpuss Video Remix)
  26. ‘What It Feels Like For A Girl’ (Above And Beyond Club Radio Edit)
  27. ‘Impressive Instant’ (Peter Rauhofer’s Universal Radio Mixshow Mix)
  28. ‘Die Another Day’ (Deepsky Radio Edit)
  29. ‘American Life’ (Felix Da Housecat’s Devin Dazzle Edit)
  30. ‘Hollywood’ (Calderone & Quayle Edit)
  31. ‘Me Against The Music’ (Peter Rauhofer Radio Mix) + – Britney Spears feat. Madonna
  32. ‘Nothing Fails’ (Tracy Young’s Underground Radio Edit)
  33. ‘Love Profusion’ (Ralph Rosario House Vocal Edit)
  34. ‘Hung Up’ (SDP Extended Vocal Edit)
  35. ‘Sorry’ (PSB Maxi Mix Edit)
  36. ‘Get Together’ (Jacques Lu Cont Vocal Edit)
  37. ‘Jump’ (Axwell Remix Edit)
  38. ‘4 Minutes’ (Bob Sinclar Space Funk Edit) + – feat. Justin Timberlake & Timbaland
  39. ‘Give It 2 Me’ (Eddie Amador Club 5 Edit)
  40. ‘Celebration’ (Benny Benassi Remix Edit)
  41. ‘Give Me All Your Luvin’’ (Party Rock Remix) – feat. LMFAO & Nicki Minaj
  42. ‘Girl Gone Wild’ (Avicii’s UMF Mix)
  43. ‘Turn Up The Radio’ (Offer Nissim Remix Edit)
  44. ‘Living For Love’ (Offer Nissim Promo Mix)
  45. ‘Ghosttown’ (Dirty Pop Intro Remix)
  46. ‘Bitch I’m Madonna’ (Sander Kleinenberg Video Edit) – feat. Nicki Minaj
  47. ‘Medellín’ (Offer Nissim Madame X In The Sphinx Mix) – Madonna and Maluma
  48. ‘I Rise’ (Tracy Young’s Pride Intro Radio Remix)
  49. ‘Crave’ (Tracy Young Dangerous Remix) – feat. Swae Lee
  50. ‘I Don’t Search I Find’ (Honey Dijon Radio Mix)

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Last weekend Madonna joined the Colombian singer Maluma on stage in Medellín to perform a pair of songs.

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Liam Gallagher apologises after death threat tweet to Atletico Madrid player Stefan Savic

Liam Gallagher has expressed his remorse following a tweet he sent directed at Atletico Madrid footballer Stefan Savic.

  • READ MORE: The NME Big Read – Liam Gallagher: “I sound good. I look cool. I talk from the heart”

Atletico Madrid played Manchester City in a Champions League match on Wednesday (April 13), and the game included a number of tense moments.

Towards the end of the match, Savic appeared to headbutt City player Raheem Sterling, though the game ended in a 0-0 draw that knocked Atletico Madrid out of the league.

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Gallagher, a supporter of Manchester City, in a now-deleted tweet responded: “Stefan Savic this is a threat if I come across you ya goofy looking CUNT your dead MCFC.”

Now, the former Oasis frontman has taken to Twitter again to apologise, though the many replies to the tweet hint at a touch of his trademark cheek and sarcasm.

“I’m really upset and annoyed at myself,” he wrote. “I feel I’ve let all my fans down by my outlandish behaviour I’m a role model to GROWN UPS hope you can forgive me.”

One person replied, suggesting: “Never act when you are upset or angry, calm down and think, then you’ll be in the right frame of mind.” Gallagher responded: “Ok Thsnx for that advice I’m really gonna take that on board.”

Another person wrote: “Will you keep the love train going?” to which Gallagher replied, “Yes I’ll give it my best shot even though it might come of the rails every now and again.”

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In other news, Peter Andre recently spoke of his past feud with Liam Gallagher, revealing that Gallagher later apologised for his behaviour.

Gallagher reportedly called the ‘Mysterious Girl’ singer a “c***” in 2007 after being asked during an interview who he would collaborate with, text or ignore out of Andre, Trevor McDonald and Dolly Parton.

Writing in his latest OK! column, Andre said: “A while later, I bumped into him and he not only apologised, but praised me for being a great father and for my relationship with my kids.

“I didn’t expect it! I knew about his ‘tough guy’ bravado, but we talked about our families. It was a bizarre encounter, but a good one.”

Gallagher is due to release his third solo studio album, ‘C’mon You Know’, on May 27 via Warner. He’s so far previewed the project with two singles, ‘Everything’s Electric’ and the record’s title track.

LG will showcase the upcoming album on a string of huge headline shows this summer, including a two-night billing at Knebworth. You can find the full schedule and buy any remaining tickets here.

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Bop Shop: Songs From Maggie Rogers, Lauv, eaJ, Jewel, And More

The search for the ever-elusive "bop" is difficult. Playlists and streaming-service recommendations can only do so much. They often leave a lingering question: Are these songs really good, or are they just new?

Enter Bop Shop, a hand-picked selection of songs from the MTV News team. This weekly collection doesn't discriminate by genre and can include anything — it's a snapshot of what's on our minds and what sounds good. We'll keep it fresh with the latest music, but expect a few oldies (but goodies) every once in a while, too. Get ready: The Bop Shop is now open for business.

  • Banks: “Holding Back”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1TO9-ujYh7A

    Banks has long melded the constraints of pop music to suit her sonic vision where she sees fit, giving us bops as daring as they are dark. She continues this effort with “Holding Back” from her new album Serpentina, out today. The thumping track begins with a high-pitched hook, an unexpected flourish from a singer known for living in her lower register that rings triumphant each time it comes around. It’s fitting for a song about taking fault for a misunderstanding, and the lyrics find her coming from a new place of maturity and wisdom: “Baby, don’t be afraid / Not every conversation is a new grenade / All I want to do is get you loved and laid / I wrote you a melody, can’t you see that?” With her fourth album, and her first as an independent artist, it’s clear this alt-pop songster knows what she’s got to offer, both in a relationship and musically, like never before. —Carson Mlnarik

  • Joesef: “It’s Been a Little Heavy Lately”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=waLP8FYgfIA

    The despair of pining for someone, of wanting so badly it feels as if your survival depends on them, seeps through the easy disco groove of “It’s Been a Little Heavy Lately.” Singer Joesef is “fucked up, crazy” with lusting need. A queer narrative underscores its music video, where Joesef’s lover is a man harboring his feelings while dating a girl, yet it’s the desperate, universal feeling of longing that sticks. “You’re the only one who can save me,” he softly pleads. “I know that isn’t fair.” —Terron Moore

  • Lauv: “All 4 Nothing (I’m So In Love)”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AH8b7EynJ60

    If Lauv is happy, we’re happy. The singer-songwriter’s new bop “All 4 Nothing (I’m So In Love)” dropped today and tells the story of a love so strong you want to spend every waking moment in it. The upbeat sultry-pop melody provides the perfect soundtrack to lose yourself in with your significant other. We see the singer do just that in the accompanying music video, which features his real-life girlfriend and co-writer, Sophie Cates. This is the most content we’ve seen Lauv as he sings, “Did you know that you’re my whole heart / Did you know that I’ll never stop / Giving you everything I got.” —Alissa Godwin

  • eaJ: “Car Crash”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3KOZ2iw8Hk

    Korean-American singer-songwriter eaJ, who was formerly known for his vocal and guitar stylings with the band Day6, kicked off his solo career today with the release of “Car Crash.” And if early streaming numbers and music video views are any indication, the artist is on a collision course for success. “There’s been so much that's happened in my life the past few years, but the fans have really stayed strong and stuck by my side,” eaJ said in an accompanying statement. He showcases his versatility with the breezy new track, pairing an airy vibe with heavier lyrics about a tumultuous relationship. It’s the perfect addition to your summer playlist. —Farah Zermane

  • Anees: “Sun and Moon”
    https://youtu.be/4zmSJhrYLXo

    I'm a sucker for most songs that start with a raw guitar chord, but add a few snaps and a gritty, melodic voice, and I'm hooked. My latest obsession riding the wave of social success is Anees's "Sun and Moon," a romantic track that praises the object of his affection as the life-sustaining force that keeps our planet in accord with the solar system. Anees accounts a gargantuan love: "Baby, baby, you're my sun and moon / Girl, you're everything between / A lot of pretty faces could waste my time / But you're my dream girl." Physicality takes center stage in love songs these days, but Anees's ballad peels back the layers of love and affection, championing the kind of intimacy that makes “the stars collide,” beckons to be protected, warrants a commitment for life, and makes you feel lucky to have found. —Virginia Lowman

  • Jewel: “The Story”

    When the American Song Contest was announced, pop fans feared it would not contain the same over-the-top flair that is so prevalent at Eurovision. But national treasure Jewel obviously did not get the memo. On the latest episode, the “Intuition” singer represented her home state of Alaska and debuted a new song, “The Story.” But instead of a folky track that would fit in on Pieces of You or Spirit, Jewel unleashed a power anthem that is 2022’s answer to Katy Perry’s “Firework.” The song is about chasing your dreams, and when “The Story” finally swells with a euphoric key change, you’ll swear you’re listening to a lost ABBA B-side. Jewel releasing the camp banger of the year? Talk about a plot twist. —Chris Rudolph

  • Peter McPoland: “Come Around”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lK8fa501N_M

    “Don’t you know you’re wonderful?” Peter McPoland asks with such pure earnestness against plucky, gleeful guitars that it seems as if he's posing the question for the first time. “Come Around” is the kind of rushing, audacious, Bleachers-esque indie anthem that feels so perfectly youthful that you can’t help but put it on repeat. By the song’s peak, falling in love becomes a matter of life and death. ”If I die tonight, I’d die loving you for the rest of my life,” he screams joyously. And maybe it should feel that terrifying. Maybe it should feel that good. —Terron Moore

  • BabyAngel69: “Candy”

    April showers bring May flowers, and this 2019 cover of a classic Mandy Moore hit is exactly what you need to bathe yourself with before we all bloom in the spring. It’s futuristic, sultry, sexy, queer, and crisp. As a follow-up, add BabyAngel69's 2021 single "Cruel Intentions," the music video for which he described as “George Michael through the lens of Britney Spears,” to your queue. This electric pop smash will leave you absolutely glowing under the disco ball; I’ll see you there. —Zach O’Connor

  • Maggie Rogers: “That’s Where I Am”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WdrNXRdkuG4

    Maggie Rogers is back! Bedroom pop's resident witchy queen has got a new cropped cut, a new record dropping on July 29, and a new sense of self. Rogers took her time crafting her follow-up to her 2019 debut Heard It In a Past Life, and lead single "That's Where I Am" shows it was more than worth the wait. With pounding drums, a glitchy synthesizer, and the same haunting breathy vocals, Maggie is less concerned with the could-have-beens; she's focused on the facts. "I told you I loved you when we were just friends / You kept me waiting and I hated you then," she confesses, before launching into a sticky chorus twisting life decisions into something more meaningful. "It all works out in the end / Wherever you go, that's where I am / Boulders turn into sand." While it's lyrically a love song, the performance and production take it somewhere higher. It's a powerful reminder that things work out the way they're supposed to, and we never truly leave the ones we've cared for. —Carson Mlnarik

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Watch Genesis play last ever gig in London: “After tonight we’ve all gotta get real jobs”

Genesis bid farewell last night (March 26) with their final gig together as a group – see footage below.

The band – comprised of Phil Collins, Mike Rutherford and Tony Banks, along with touring musicians Daryl Stuermer, Nic Collins, Daniel Pearce and Patrick Smyth – bowed out with a sold-out show at London’s O2 Arena.

Formed at Charterhouse School, Godalming, Surrey, in 1967, last night’s show marks the end of an illustrious 55-year career that sees them remembered as one of music’s most successful acts, selling over 100million albums worldwide.

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The 1970s line-up featuring Collins on drums, singer Peter Gabriel and guitarist Steve Hackett is regarded one of progressive rock’s most pioneering groups.

Playing 23 tracks in total, Genesis ran through a long list of their biggest hits including ‘I Can’t Dance’, ‘Mama’, ‘Turn It On Again’, ‘No Son Of Mine’ and ‘Invisible Touch’.

Before playing ‘Land Of Confusion’, Collins addressed the crowd and announced that it would be Genesis’ final show. As the crowd applauded the band, Collins sat looking pensive, seemingly taking in the fact that it was the last hoorah. He then quipped: “After tonight we’ve all gotta get real jobs.”

Among the notable guests in attendance, the band’s original frontman, Peter Gabriel stopped by to see his former band’s final show. Gabriel famously departed Genesis in 1975, and hadn’t played with the band since a one-off reunion in 1982.

During the set, Collins acknowledged Gabriel’s presence in the crowd by joking that he was the one shouting that he wanted to hear ‘Supper’s Ready’.

Gabriel and Collins shared a photograph with one another after the show alongside the band’s longtime friend and tour manager, Richard McPhail. You can see the picture, along with footage from the show below.

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Genesis played:

‘Behind the Lines’ / ‘Duke’s End’
‘Turn It On Again’
‘Mama’
‘Land Of Confusion’
‘Home By The Sea’
‘Second Home By The Sea’
‘Fading Lights’
‘The Cinema Show’
‘Afterglow’

ACOUSTIC:
‘That’s All’
‘The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway’
‘Follow You Follow Me’
‘Duchess’
‘No Son Of Mine’
‘Firth Of Fifth’
‘I Know What I Like (In Your Wardrobe)’ (with ‘Stagnation’ snippet)
‘Domino’
‘Throwing It All Away’
‘Tonight, Tonight, Tonight’
‘Invisible Touch’

ENCORE:
‘I Can’t Dance’
‘Dancing With The Moonlit Knight’
‘The Carpet Crawlers’

Meanwhile, Jimmy Page has said that it was a mistake to enlist Phil Collins to fill in on drums for Led Zeppelin at Live Aid.

Collins and drummer Tony Thompson both played live with the reunited Led Zep – Page, Robert Plant and John Paul Jones – at the legendary 1985 concert, as did session musician Paul Martinez.

Speaking in a recent interview with The Sunday Times, Page admitted it was “not very clever” to reform the band, who had split in 1980 following the death of their drummer John Bonham.

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Spotify reportedly set to suspend its service in Russia

Spotify are reportedly set to suspend its service in Russia in response to the country’s newly announced media law.

According to Reuters, the streaming platform, which closed its office in Russia indefinitely earlier this month due to Moscow’s “unprovoked attack on Ukraine”, is expected to cease in the country late next month.

It comes after Russia introduced a new legislation that makes it illegal to report any event that could discredit the Russian military.

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“Spotify has continued to believe that it’s critically important to try to keep our service operational in Russia to provide trusted, independent news and information from the region,” the company said in a statement.

“Unfortunately, recently enacted legislation further restricting access to information, eliminating free expression, and criminalizing certain types of news puts the safety of Spotify’s employees and the possibility of even our listeners at risk.”

Ukraine has been under attack since February 24, when Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered a military operation in the neighbouring country. The decision prompted Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelenskyy to sever diplomatic ties with Russia and declare martial law, and sparked widespread condemnation and the enacting of sanctions by countries across the globe.

Spotify on a phone screen
Spotify on a phone screen. CREDIT: Alamy Stock Photo

Earlier this month, the platform said that its paid subscription service would no longer be available to users in Russia.

In addition to its potential shutdown, Spotify has also removed all content from Kremlin-backed outlets RT and Sputnik that was hosted on the platform in the European Union and other markets. Spotify has also launched a guide on the platform that directs users to localised “trusted news” sources.

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Spotify is just one of many Western companies who have taken action in the days following the invasion. Earlier this month, tech giant Apple halted all product sales in Russia, with the company saying in a statement that it was “deeply concerned” with the invasion and stood with those “suffering as a result of the violence”. Netflix has also suspended its service in Russia.

In the world of music, Green Day, Yungblud, Louis Tomlinson, Franz Ferdinand, Iggy Pop and Nick Cave are among those who have cancelled scheduled concerts in Russia. Meanwhile, Russian rapper Oxxxymiron also cancelled a string of sold-out shows in Moscow and St. Petersburg, saying in a statement: “I know that most people in Russia are against this war”.

David Gilmour, Stevie Nicks, Madonna, Miley Cyrus, Elton John, Dee Snider and Foalshave voiced their support for the people of Ukraine. Additionally, Ukrainian artists such as metal band Jinjer, Ukrainian-born, London-based pop duo Bloom Twins, and Lviv-based pop singer Khrystyna Soloviy have spoken out in light of the ongoing crisis, with the latter two acts recently speaking to NME about the conflict.

Last month, organisers of the Eurovision Song Contest announced that no Russian act would be permitted to participate in this year’s edition of the competition.

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Lucky Daye’s CandyDrip Has Flavor For All Your Senses

By Rashad D. Grove

In today’s R&B landscape, Lucky Daye has emerged as a torchbearer of the genre’s rich history while simultaneously curating music that defies labels. Since his debut Painted was released in 2019, the multiple Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter has been redefining modern R&B through, as he says, “a futuristic sci-fi world shaped by the inspiration of Afrofuturism.” In other words, with his evocative songwriting and penchant for creating mesmerizing melodies, Daye is intent on taking his listeners back to the future. This unique motif is what he believes makes him stand out amongst his peers.

“I think I bring individuality to the music industry. I'm not trying to fall into a mode of what everyone thinks an R&B artist should be,” Daye said to MTV News over the phone in March. “I just put my foot down and be like, y’all can have the labels. I’ma just be me, and that’s what I bring to the table. I want people to know that I care about more them hearing my songs. It’s about more than that.”

With his second album, CandyDrip, released on March 10, the New Orleans native, who previously penned songs for Keith Sweat, Ne-Yo, Boyz II Men, Keke Palmer, Ella Mai, and Mary J. Blige, further cements his place in the contemporary music scene as an artist to be reckoned with.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=owxRRNA_RuE

Conceptually, CandyDrip was conceived out of a series of jam sessions over the course of a few days in Los Angeles. According to Daye, during the recording, he was in a creative zone where he collaborated with some of the most accomplished and innovative musicians on the scene, including guitarist Pierre-Luc Rioux, violinist Peter Lee Johnson, trombonist Chris Johnson, trumpeter Brandyn Phillips, and multi-instrumentalist Yonatan "xSDTRK" Ayal, just to name a few. In creating the LP, Daye immersed himself in the process by expressing all of his pent-up energy and channeling his creative prowess. That power is immediately apparent on the silky smooth “Guess,” and reflective “Compassion.” The undeniable synergy of these sessions eventually evolved into the nexus for CandyDrip, which Daye believes is his greatest artistic statement to date.

“We rented out EastWest Studios and called every musician we knew,” he recalled, shouting out the recording home of Frank Ocean’s Channel Orange, among other albums. “Those ideas were so special that we took those skeletons and built on them throughout the pandemic. Once we got near the end of everything and were close to the release of the album, we started mixing a lot of the songs. Actually, you can divide the album into two different halves.”

The duality is reflected in its title as well. “It’s called CandyDrip because it's triggering your senses, your taste buds of music. Some stuff may make you cringe, and some will make you say, wow, that was an amazing dish.”

The first two singles from the album — “NWA” featuring Lil Durk, and “Over” — are snapshots of those recording sessions, and both tracks garnered critical acclaim upon their release. Each one captures another dimension of Daye and his willingness to push the boundaries of his creativity. On “NWA,” Daye effortlessly floats over a mid-tempo bounce track where he alludes to a run-in with the police, while on “Over,” which samples Musiq Soulchild’s “Halfcrazy,” he’s trapped in a toxic relationship where there seems to be no escape. Both songs reveal dimensions of Daye’s persona and his immense versatility as a singer-songwriter.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ylf8gJQe8So

Heavily influenced by the vocal stylings of Usher and the sonic mastery of Missy “Misdemeanor”’ Elliott and Timbaland, Daye also spoke about how the sound of the Crescent City has left an indelible mark on his musicality and is a foundational imprint of the album.

“The influence of New Orleans has had a major impact on my music. There are Spanish, French, Haitian, and American influences, so it's a gumbo pot of sounds,” he said. “You go out there in the streets and it still looks like Paris, so it gives you that freedom to experiment when it comes to music. I think coming from that place made me limitless as an artist and it left me believing that I could do anything. It gave me a lot of confidence with my music.”

After his critically acclaimed EP Table For Two was released last year, it garnered two Grammy nominations for Best Traditional R&B Performance and Best Progressive R&B Album, bringing Daye’s total career nominations so far to six. Since then, though, he says he’s grown immeasurably as an artist and as a person. He expressed his internal struggle of navigating through the pressure of creating his highly anticipated sophomore album and dealing with the expectations from his fans. While his first official project, 2019’s Painted, was created for himself, on this album, he’s aiming to showcase his metamorphosis.

“I think I evolved a lot since the first album, especially because I worked with a lot of different artists. I think I learned how to let people live and to let things go and to just bring good vibes to my music,” he said. “Also, I realized that I’m not making music just for myself anymore. With the first album, I didn’t get any outside opinions like I did for this album. I still have anxiety about it because I don’t want to let the people down.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w9k_PfCL2ow

One commonality that runs through all of Daye’s work is the organic chemistry and partnership that he’s forged with his long-time collaborator, Grammy winner Dernst “D’Mile” Emile, who produced all of Daye’s debut album and the majority of CandyDrip, including the stunning “Cherry Forest” and the seductive, climatic closing track “Ego.”

“My relationship with D’Mile goes beyond music. Music was what we had in common, although we almost gave up. We were on our way back home, but now he's like the go-to producer of R&B. When people think of him, they think of me. I see him as my family, not only in music but in life.”

Not only has he dropped a new album, but Daye is also headlining his own national tour in support of the project. Like many other artists, this is his first time being back on the road for live performances since the COVID-19 pandemic halted most concerts. He says he’s looking forward to experiencing the energy of the crowd that he’s missed so much.

“I can’t wait to get back on the road. It’s been over two years,” he said with excitement. “I can’t wait to see all my fans and supporters.”

While it’s steeped in contemporary R&B, CandyDrip is an amalgamation of all of the musical forces that have shaped Lucky Daye. Traces of hip-hop, soul, blues, and gospel are all peppered throughout the project. It’s an invitation to a journey to explore an array of emotions, the art of sensuality, and features some of Daye’s best vocal performances. CandyDrip is a reminder of the artistic progression of Lucky Daye and how his music is just the flavor that we need.

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Ed Sheeran’s co-writer Johnny McDaid calls plagiarism “abhorrent” in ‘Shape Of You’ case

Ed Sheeran‘s co-writer Johnny McDaid has described the idea of plagiarism as “abhorrent” during the ongoing copyright court case regarding ‘Shape Of You’.

Sheeran, McDaid and co-writer Steve Mac have been accused of lifting “particular lines and phrases” for the 2017 ‘÷’ single from a track called ‘Oh Why’ by Sami Switch.

  • READ MORE: Ed Sheeran – ‘=’ review: the millennial Lionel Richie indulges his saccharine streak

The latter artist and his co-writer Ross O’Donoghue have alleged that Sheeran took the “oh I, oh I, oh I, oh I” hook from the aforementioned song, which was released back in 2015. Sheeran has denied the claim and rejected the suggestion that he heard ‘Oh Why’ before he wrote ‘Shape Of You’ in October 2016.

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As BBC News reports, Snow Patrol‘s McDaid claimed in written evidence that he could not recall ever hearing ‘Oh Why’ “in any way” and said he was unaware of Sami Switch before the current legal case began.

“I have been a professional songwriter for many years and have achieved substantial success,” he wrote.

“I do not need or want to, nor would I ever, plagiarise other people’s work. The idea is abhorrent to me.”

McDaid has also penned tracks for the likes of BTS, Pink, Rag’n’Bone Man, John Newman and Maisie Peters over the course of his career.

He and Sheeran both deny that they copied the “oh I” section. On Tuesday (March 8), Sheeran sang snippets of Simone’s 1965 rendition of ‘Feeling Good’ and Blackstreet’s 1996 hit ‘No Diggity’ in court in an effort to illustrate how the melody in question is commonplace in pop music.

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“If you put them all in the same key, they’ll sound the same,” Sheeran argued.

Lawyers for Chokri and O’Donoghue played audio clips from the recording sessions for ‘Shape Of You’ to the court, in which Sheeran could be heard saying that he needed to change the “oh I” part because it was “a bit close to the bone”.

In response, the singer told the court: “We thought it was a bit too close to ‘No Diggity’. I said that… we should change it.”

McDaid, meanwhile, said there was “nothing original” about the melody. “[It] uses sequential notes from the pentatonic scale,” he wrote. “It is a very common melodic structure, in my experience.”

Recalling the “frenetic, rapid process” of creating ‘Shape Of You’ alongside Sheeran and Mac – the latter of whom also produced the track – McDaid added: “The words ‘shape of you’ came from me. It is a phrase used in Derry [Northern Ireland], where I come from.

“I am sensitive to objectification and I was not keen on [the lyrics] ‘in love with your body’ so I suggested the more abstract ‘shape of you’, although both appear in the song in its finished form.”

McDaid claimed that he could not remember who came up with the “oh I” section, which he described as “filler” that was added in order to “make the song flow”.

Earlier in the case, the court heard how Sheeran and McDaid had previously settled a plagiarism case over their 2014 song ‘Photograph’, though McDaid said they did not believe they had copied parts of another song for it.

It was also noted that the pair had added the writers of TLC’s ‘No Scrubs’ to the ‘Shape Of You’ credits following comparisons between the two tracks.

ed sheeran
Ed Sheeran arrives at court for the “Shape Of You” song copyright claim at High Court on March 08, 2022 in London (Picture: Karwai Tang/WireImage)

McDaid, however, “wholeheartedly disagree[d]” with the suggestion those previous situations indicated that he “was in the habit of consciously or sub-consciously appropriating the skill and labour of other songwriters during my songwriting and recording sessions”.

“It is simply not true and I feel that is a very serious thing to suggest about me and how I work,” he said in his witness statement.

Royalties from ‘Shape Of You’, estimated to be worth £20million, have been frozen since Chokri and O’Donoghue issued a claim for “copyright infringement, damages and an account of profits in relation to the alleged infringement” in July 2018.

Earlier this week, Ed Sheeran revealed in court that he had written 25 songs with The National‘s Aaron Dessner.

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Stevie Wonder speaks out in support of Ukraine: “We must stand up to hate”

Stevie Wonder has spoken out in support of the Ukraine, which he says is “in a battle for the soul of the world” due to it ongoing conflict with Russia.

In a video statement shared on Friday (March 4), the Motown legend condemned Russia’s “evil” invasion and called for people to rise up in order to “prevent World War III”.

“Can we survive if Ukraine does not? That is the question that all of us should ask,” Wonder began. “Are we surprised that the forces of evil are alive and aggressive in today’s world? I’m not surprised, and you shouldn’t be either. I write and sing about it because I can feel it. You should know about it because you can see, unless you have a blind eye to it and don’t want to do anything about it, you should see it.”

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“This is not just a Ukrainian war,” he continued. “Today, Ukraine is in a battle for the soul of the world. As we speak, they’re fighting forces of evil. We have seen what evil has and can do. Doesn’t matter what country or color. Now, evil threatens the sovereignty of one country and the sanctity of all others. What additional tragedies will it take for us to stop this aggression?”

Wonder concluded: “Hate has no colour, has no loyalty. Greed has no commitment, but to itself. Only you, the people, can prevent World War III. We must stand up to hate and kill hate before it kills us. I believe in power of the people, all the people. We can stop this right now.”

Wonder’s statement comes after Ukraine severed diplomatic ties with Russia and declared martial law after Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered an attack on the neighbouring nation last week (February 24).

The actions of Putin, who has claimed that Russia does not intend to occupy Ukraine and that his country’s actions amount to a “special military operation”, have drawn widespread condemnation from across the globe.

Reactions to the situation in Ukraine from prominent figures in the worlds of music, entertainment and politics have been posted on social media, with the likes of Foals’ Yannis Philippakis, Bring Me The Horizon‘s Oli Sykes, Franz Ferdinand‘s Alex Kapranos, Yungblud, London Mayor Sadiq Khan, Taika Waititi and Amanda Palmer all speaking out in support of Ukraine.

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Elton John said he was “heartbroken” over the “nightmare” that civilians are facing, while Miley Cyrus called for “an immediate end to this violence”.

Fleetwood Mac’s Stevie Nicks has penned an emotive post about the ongoing conflict saying “my heart is broken”, while Madonna voiced her support for Ukraine with a fanmade video set to a remix of her 2005 song ‘Sorry’.

Meanwhile, Russian rapper Oxxxymiron has cancelled a series of shows in Moscow and St. Petersburg in protest of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

Ukraine, which has a population of 44million people, borders both Russia and the European Union. As the BBC reports, Russia has long resisted Ukraine’s move towards embracing European institutions like NATO and the EU.

Putin is now demanding guarantees from the West and Ukraine that it will not join NATO, a defensive alliance of 30 countries, and that Ukraine demilitarise and become a neutral state.

You can donate here to the Red Cross to help those affected by the conflict.

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Louis Tomlinson, HEALTH among latest to cancel Russian performances

As the Russian attacks on Ukraine continue, more artists have cancelled their scheduled appearances in the former nation.

Louis Tomlinson and HEALTH are among the latest to pull their Russian gigs, joining the likes of Yungblud, Green Day and Russian rapper Oxxxymiron.

  • READ MORE: Louis Tomlinson – ‘Walls’ review: Oasis-inspired album is the foundation for a rewarding future

Tomlinson was due to perform in both Ukraine and Russia this year, with a show at Kyiv’s Stereo Plaza slated for Monday July 4, and at Moscow’s Crocus City Hall on Wednesday July 6.

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In a statement shared to social media overnight, the former One Direction singer wrote: “Due to the recent events in Ukraine, I have to sadly announce that my tour shows in Moscow and Kyiv are canceled until further notice. The safety of my fans is my priority and my thoughts go out to the people of Ukraine and all those suffering from this needless war.”

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A post shared by Louis Tomlinson (@louist91)

HEALTH, on the other hand, were booked in to play two shows in Russia next month, taking to St. Petersburg’s Mod Club on Friday April 29, and Moscow’s Aglomerat on Saturday April 30. They wrote in a similar statement that although they “do not wish to penalise [their] fans for governmental decisions that are beyond their control”, the band would cancel both shows out of respect for “the current state of affairs”.

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A post shared by HEALTH (@_health_)

Russian forces launched a military assault on Ukraine in the early hours of last Thursday (February 24). It was reported then that Ukraine had officially severed its diplomatic ties with Russia, and declared martial law after Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered an attack on the neighbouring nation. At the time, Ukraine officials said Putin had “launched a full-scale invasion”.

The actions of Putin, who has claimed that Russia does not intend to occupy Ukraine and that his country’s actions amount to a “special military operation”, have drawn widespread condemnation from across the globe.

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Late last Sunday (February 27), an update from Ukraine’s interior ministry said 352 Ukrainian civilians had been killed in the conflict so far, including 14 children. They said a further 1684 people, including 116 children, had been wounded (via The Guardian).

Fleetwood Mac‘s Stevie Nicks spoke out to say that her “heart was broken” over the situation, and compared Putin to Hitler. Franz Ferdinand‘s Alex Kapranos paid tribute to the “open and welcoming” people of Kyiv, while Foals honoured the Ukrainian crew of their recent ‘2am’ video. Miley Cyrus, Yungblud and Elton John were among the other artists to issue statements of solidarity with the Ukrainian people.

It was also announced last week (February 25), that Russia would not be allowed to participate in this year’s Eurovision Song Contest.

Ukraine, which has a population of 44million people, borders both Russia and the European Union. As the BBC reports, Russia has long resisted Ukraine’s move towards embracing European institutions like NATO and the EU. Putin is now demanding guarantees from the West and Ukraine that it will not join NATO, a defensive alliance of 30 countries, and that Ukraine demilitarise and become a neutral state.

You can donate here to the Red Cross to help those affected by the conflict, or via a number of other ways through Choose Love.

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Elton John speaks out in support of Ukraine: “We are heartbroken”

Elton John has expressed that he’s “heartbroken” over the “nightmare” the people of Ukraine are currently living through.

  • READ MORE: Elton John: “I’m not interested in the past – not even Elton John’s past”

It comes after Ukraine severed diplomatic ties with Russia and declared martial law after Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered an attack on the neighbouring nation on Thursday (February 24).

Last night (February 26), John took to Instagram to post an image of Ukraine’s blue and yellow flag, showing his support for those affected by the attacks.

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“For over 20 years, the Elton John AIDS Foundation has supported some of the most vulnerable people in Ukraine with access to HIV services and care, as part of our commitment to communities across Eastern Europe and Central Asia.

The ‘Rocket Man’ singer’s charity was established in 1992 and supports HIV prevention, education programs and support services for those living with HIV.

“We are heartbroken and appalled to see this conflict unfold and our hearts are with the people of Ukraine who do not deserve to live through this nightmare,” he continued. “During these devastating times, we stand for an end to the violence and suffering in Ukraine so that life-saving services and humanitarian aid can reach those desperately in need.”

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Elton John (@eltonjohn)

The actions of Putin, who has claimed that Russia does not intend to occupy Ukraine and that his country’s actions amount to a “special military operation”, have drawn widespread condemnation from across the globe.

Reactions to the situation in Ukraine from prominent figures in the worlds of music, entertainment and politics have been posted on social media, with the likes of Foals’ Yannis Philippakis, Bring Me The Horizon‘s Oli Sykes, Franz Ferdinand‘s Alex Kapranos, Yungblud, London Mayor Sadiq Khan, Taika Waititi and Amanda Palmer all speaking out in support of Ukraine.

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Fleetwood Mac’s Stevie Nicks has penned an emotive post about the ongoing conflict saying “my heart is broken”, while Madonna voiced her support for Ukraine with a fanmade video set to a remix of her 2005 song ‘Sorry’.

Meanwhile, Russian rapper Oxxxymiron has cancelled a series of shows in Moscow and St. Petersburg in protest of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

Ukraine, which has a population of 44million people, borders both Russia and the European Union. As the BBC reports, Russia has long resisted Ukraine’s move towards embracing European institutions like NATO and the EU.

Putin is now demanding guarantees from the West and Ukraine that it will not join NATO, a defensive alliance of 30 countries, and that Ukraine demilitarise and become a neutral state.

You can donate here to the Red Cross to help those affected by the conflict.

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Ukrainian artists on the Russian crisis: “Now is the time to push for change”

Artists from Ukraine have spoken to NME about the ongoing conflict with Russia, and what the rest of the world can do to help.

Ukraine has officially severed diplomatic ties with Russia, and declared martial law, after Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered an attack on the neighbouring nation on Thursday (February 24).

In the time since the invasion launched, 198 Ukrainians – including three children – have been killed at the time of writing, according to Health Minister Viktor Liashko. A further 1,115 people have reportedly been wounded, including 33 children (via Al Jazeera). Russian authorities have not released casualty figures for their forces.

Speaking to NME from London, where they have lived for nine years, electro-pop duo Bloom Twins described the situation as “terrifying”.

“It has really affected us,” said singer Anna Kuprienko. “We’re talking to our family, we have a lot of friends and our second manager living there. We go back to the Ukraine quite a lot. We were only there two months ago. We were hopeful that this situation with Russia wouldn’t go where it has and that it would resolve.

“I literally spoke to my dad and our manager like six hours before everything happened. I called them and no one believed this would happen, then we all woke up to this crazy news. Then everyone was in a state of shock and panic and it became impossible to leave.”

Hailing Ukraine’s “incredible and unique culture” of “interesting artists and fashion icons”, the duo of twin sisters (who grew up in Brovary, a suburb of Kyiv) explained how their nationality ran through everything they do – and that nothing would ever extinguish the identity of their people.

“We are always true to our roots,” Sonia Kuprienko told NME. “We would never forget about our past. Even now, having lived here for nearly 10 years, people tell us that our melodies are very much Ukrainian and Slavic.

She added: “Ukraine cannot be erased. It cannot. It will always stay with us, no matter what. It’s in our hearts.”

On the death toll and threat of what’s at stake in their native country, Anna said time was of the essence for immediate action. “A few days ago it felt like a safe place,” she explained. “People were going to restaurants, people were going to work – then within a few hours the whole thing changed. You look at the press and images of men shooting in the streets of Kyiv, and there are no people and it’s being demolished in just a few days. It’s possible that everything could be destroyed overnight. It’s a scary thing.”

She continued: “I hope for peace for everyone, and for everyone to have a piece of each other’s love. For the people who I love, I just want them to be safe and get out of there. It’s impossible to even get into the car from your house and drive 20km.

“My immediate hope is for them to be safe, and my future hope is for Ukraine to not be demolished and for people to do something to stop this. It’s ridiculous. How does this happen in 2022? This shouldn’t be possible.”

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Sonia stressed that “we also have a lot of Russian people who we love, and Russian people who love Ukraine and love living there” and that this conflict “will not change our hearts towards them”, but the duo said they supported sanctions against Russia as a way to help bring about the end of bloodshed.

“I think it’s really hard on Russian people who are pure and want a change to happen,” said Anna. “To stop giving them a visa must be terrible, but on the other hand what can you do to stop people from dying? In a way I would much prefer this stuff to happen, because we need to stop people dying in an immediate way.”

As for Western artists who might have upcoming shows in Russia, Sonia said that they too should be stopped until Russia’s invasion is over. “Touring in Russia right now doesn’t sound like a good idea,” she said. “Ukrainians should be hiding while Russians are waiting for us to entertain them? I don’t think that’s logical.”

Bloom Twins ended by advising people from other countries to “look at the bigger picture” to take the time to see what people from inside Ukraine are posting online in order to “follow what is truthfully happening”, as well as signing petitions and joining in protests as they have been to make their voices heard and bring about action and aid for those suffering, in addition to long-lasting change and a peaceful end to the conflict.

“It’s important to strike for change,” said Anna. “Now is the time for push for that. Post about it, go to the protests and talk about it. People think it’s just a Ukrainian conflict, but don’t even know what’s going to happen later. No one knows what’s going to happen to the Ukraine, no one knows what’s going to happen to the whole of Europe, no one knows what’s going to happen a few days from now. People need to do something to stop this because if it goes any further then it might be very bad for everyone.”

She added: “Do not be indifferent. Imagine this happening in your own country – it’s heartbreaking. It’s not like Ukraine is the first place this has happened to. It happens to so many countries all the time. People need to be aware of this stuff and try to make a change because tomorrow it could be them.”

One artist who remains in Ukraine is singer-songwriter Khrystyna Soloviy. Having been inspired by the Maidan revolution (or Revolution of Dignity) that saw the ousting of now-exiled president Viktor Yanukovych in 2014, she penned the song ‘Trymai’ (‘Hold Me‘) which went viral with 38million views and found Soloviy fame.

Earlier this week, she released the song ‘Ya Nesu Myr’ (‘I Bring Peace’) in reaction to the Russian threat. Check out the song above.

“This is one of the hardest songs for me,” she told NME. “I released this demo 10 hours before the Russian invasion. In these last peace hours I felt anxiety and tremor. The mood of the song is dictated by life in Ukraine with the permanent war with Russia for the last eight years. This song is addressed to young people who decide to take up arms to defend our freedom.”

She continued: “We are a generation that has never seen the Soviet Union and was born in a free Ukraine. Ukrainians are not Russians, as said by the Russian government. We have a difficult, depressed history of Russian colonisation. With this song I want to support the spirit of my friends and listeners.

“It’s about the just war theory, when war is the last resort of survival. We are dreaming about living in peace and doing the usual things for us: to have strolls in free Kyiv, to go to the seaside in the free Crimea.”

Speaking to NME from her hometown of Lviv in West Ukraine near Poland, she described the city as “an easy target”.

“Every day we have several civil defence sirens,” she said. “We feel fear, but not helplessness. The whole civilised world stand with us. We believe in victory.”

Soloviy said that writing and releasing songs was “the only thing I can do now as an artist”, while the war unfolded around her. “Now the future of Ukraine is at stake as a free country or a colonised appendage again,” she said. “I believe in the Armed Forces of Ukraine. With the help from the allies they inflict huge losses on the Russian troops, the largest in Russian history.”

The singer also argued that the idea of Western artists wishing to tour Russia was “insane”, saying that “concerts are a business; Russia is very toxic now, they are an aggressor against the free world. How can you do business with an aggressor? How could they pay taxes in this country? This will be toleration of war.”

Ultimately, she called “all eyes to Ukraine” and for people elsewhere to show solidarity where they could.

“Don’t just watch the news and scroll feeds,” she said. “Unite in rallies, demand sanctions from your government against Russia, do not tolerate Russian goods. Discover and support new Ukrainian independent music, which was born during the war with Russia: Onuka, Latexfauna, DakhaBrakha.

“Andy Warhol, Serge Gainsbourg and many others have Ukrainian origin; their parents were forced to emigrate due to the wars in Ukraine. We are about a free future, not about war. Don’t just look at us as victims, we are creators.”

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The actions of Putin, who has claimed that Russia does not intend to occupy Ukraine and that his country’s actions amount to a “special military operation”, have drawn widespread condemnation from across the globe.

As well as reactions from figures from the worlds of music, politics, entertainment and beyond in the West, this week also saw Russian rapper Oxxxymiron cancelled a series of shows in Moscow and St. Petersburg in protest of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

“I know that most people in Russia are against this war, and I am confident that the more people would talk about their real attitude to it, the faster we can stop this horror,” said Oxxxymiron in a statement. “I cannot entertain you when Russian missiles are falling on Ukraine—when residents of Kyiv are forced to hide in basements and in the metro, while people are dying.”

He is one of several other Russian musicians who have voiced their protest at the war. Kasta, Shym, Vladi, Khamil, Zmey, and Noize MC have all voiced their opposition to the attack on Ukraine.

ukraine
A general view of a near empty Independence Square on February 24, 2022 in Kyiv, Ukraine. (Picture: Chris McGrath/Getty Images)

Fleetwood Mac’s Stevie Nicks spoke out to say that her “heart was broken” over the situation and compared Putin to Hitler, Franz Ferdinand’s Alex Kapranos paid tribute to the “open and welcoming” people of Kyiv,  and Foals honoured the Ukrainian crew of their recent ‘2am video‘, while both Miley Cyrus and Yunblud were among the artists to issue statements of solidarity with the Ukrainian people.

Actor Sean Penn is currently in the Ukraine making a documentary about the situation.

It was also announced yesterday (Friday February 25), that Russia would not be allowed to participate this year’s Eurovision Song Contest.

Ukraine, which has a population of 44million people, borders both Russia and the European Union. As the BBC reports, Russia has long resisted Ukraine’s move towards embracing European institutions like NATO and the EU.

Putin is now demanding guarantees from the West and Ukraine that it will not join NATO, a defensive alliance of 30 countries, and that Ukraine demilitarise and become a neutral state.

You can donate here to the Red Cross to help those affected by the conflict, or via a number of other ways through Choose Love.

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Pete Doherty requires “immediate treatment” following “respiratory infection”

Pete Doherty was advised to pull out of a Libertines gig in Bristol tonight (February 24) after it was discovered that he has a “respiratory infection”.

  • READ MORE: Pete Doherty and Frédéric Lo on how French serenity and being drug-free shaped their new album

The band, who are in the middle of their rescheduled ‘Giddy Up A Ding-Dong Tour’, took to social media this evening to share the news.

“A doctor has been called to assess Peter’s condition tonight after he developed a high fever and shortness of breath,” the post began. “Thankfully, he has tested negative for COVID-19, but has been diagnosed with a respiratory infection which requires immediate treatment.

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“Unfortunately, he has been advised not to perform tonight under any circumstances, which was not a decision taken lightly, and he remains under close observation with the doctor.”

The band said they were unclear as to whether Doherty will be able to perform at their two London shows this weekend at O2 Forum Kentish Town. “Further updates tomorrow afternoon with regard to the weekends shows,” the Libertines wrote.

Earlier this month, Doherty revealed that he’s planning to sign a prisoner he met at a Glasgow jail to his record label.

The singer-songwriter met the prisoner while involved in a project that saw him playing to prisoners as part of a life-drawing class. Doherty would play guitar while the prisoners at Barlinnie Prison drew him.

Elsewhere, Doherty and collaborator Frédéric Lo recently announced a UK and European tour.

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The Libertines and Babyshambles frontman teamed up with the French musician for a new joint album, ‘The Fantasy Life Of Poetry & Crime’, which is due for release on March 18 via Doherty’s own Strap Originals label.

The duo will hit the road in May for ‘The Fantasy Life…’ tour. Kicking off in Paris on May 5, the stint also includes stop-offs in Cologne (6), Berlin (7), Amsterdam (9) and Belgium (11).

They will touch down in the UK on May 13 for a headline performance at KOKO in Camden, London. They’ll then visit Birmingham (14), Liverpool (16), Aberdeen (18), Hull (19) and Cambridge (20).

Meanwhile, The Libertines recently announced a special show in Newcastle set to take place this summer for the city’s Rock N Roll Circus festival.

The band will headline the festival on Saturday, June 11 as part of the 20th anniversary celebrations of their debut album ‘Up The Bracket’. The landmark LP was released on October 14 2002, and is known for tracks like ‘Time For Heroes’, ‘The Boys In The Band’ and its title track.

Rock N Roll Circus, set to take place in the Town Moor, mixes live music with elements of circus like aerialists, contortionists, stilt walkers, acrobats and more. Noel Gallagher’s High-Flying Birds have been confirmed for the opening night on Thursday, June 9, and DMA’S will join The Libertines on the Saturday bill.

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Dave Grohl pays tribute to Mark Lanegan: “If he sang about pain, you believed it”

Dave Grohl has paid tribute to Mark Lanegan who died earlier this week, remembering him as an artist that could expertly express emotion through singing.

  • READ MORE: Mark Lanegan, 1964 – 2022: a foundation stone in modern alternative rock

The Foo Fighters frontman said that Lanegan, whom he joined in being a sometime member of Queens Of The Stone Age, was “so pure and so real” in his artistry.

“If he sang about pain, you believed it and if he sang about love, you believed it,” Grohl told The Independent about the late singer.

“If you know anything about his story, or have read any of his books, you’ll understand why he sang what he did and why he sang it the way that he did. There was nobody like him. In Seattle he was much loved,” Grohl added.

Credit: Getty

He also reflected on how he met Lanegan 30 years ago, which you can read about here.

Lanegan, the former Screaming Trees frontman and soloist in his own name, died at the age of 57 on Tuesday (February 22) at his home in Killarney, Ireland. Tributes have been paid by Manic Street Preachers, New Order‘s Peter Hook and many others.

The singer appeared on a number of early Queens Of The Stone Age albums including ‘Rated R’ (2000) and ‘Songs For The Deaf’ (2002). Grohl, too, is an occasional member of the band that has a revolving roster of members and collaborators.

Lanegan’s 2020 memoir Sing Backwards And Weep documented his long battle with addiction as well as his music career. He also released another memoir last year called Devil In A Coma which was inspired by his near-death experience from COVID.

It’s not yet been revealed what Lanegan’s cause of death was.

Meanwhile, Grohl has discussed his hearing loss, saying that he’s been lip-reading for decades and that COVID mask-wearing has caused further issues for him in recent years.

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Grunge icon Mark Lanegan has died, aged 57

Grunge icon Mark Lanegan has died, aged 57.

  • READ MORE: Mark Lanegan: “My former bandmates were lucky to have me”

The news was confirmed with a post on his official Twitter account page. It read: “Our beloved friend Mark Lanegan passed away this morning at his home in Killarney, Ireland.

“A beloved singer, songwriter, author and musician he was 57 and is survived by his wife Shelley.  No other information is available at this time.

“We ask Please respect the family privacy.”

Lanegan was the frontman with The Screaming Trees from 1985-2000 and was also known for his work with bands like Queens of the Stone Age, Mad Season, The Gutter Twins and for his many numerous collaborations.

One of his most recent of these was with the Manic Street Preachers on their last album, ‘The Ultra Vivid Lament.’ Lanegan had kept in contact with the Manics following their joint support slot with Oasis on their chaotic 1996 US tour.

Speaking to NME last year, the Manics’ James Dean Bradfield fondly remembered The Screaming Trees for their “bitter edge”, adding that “there was as much tension within their band as they were turning out unto the world. I like it when you see a band and it’s as if they’re almost falling apart on stage. We’ve been that band sometimes too.”

Speaking about his work with Lanegan on their last album, Bradfield and drummer Sean Moore said Lanegan was “the only name in mind” for work on their song ‘Blank Diary Entry’.

“I’ve met him a fair few times and have a little bit of a connection,” Bradfield said last year. “I’m five-foot-six and he’s nearly nine-foot tall. It looks a bit like R2D2 and Chewbacca when we walk side by side.”

Tributes for Lanegan have begun to pour in on social media.

Anton Newcombe wrote: “I am in absolute shock, a very beautiful soul has left this world. I love you brother…my deepest condolences to his family and friends,” while Charlatans frontman Tim Burgess added: “Oh no. Terrible news that Mark Lanegan has left us. Safe travels man – you’ll be missed.”

Peter Hook who wrote: “Mark Lanegan was a lovely man. He led a wild life that some of us could only dream of. He leaves us with fantastic words and music! Thank god that through all of that he will live forever.”

Rob Delaney added: “I love you Mark Lanegan. A colossal, spectacular body of work.”

The Manic Street Preachers said: “Devastated by this-heartbreaking.”

The continued: “A huge talent on so many levels – such an amazing voice and all those beautiful words.”

You can see some of the many tributes to Lanegan below.

Speaking to NME in a far-ranging interview in 2020, Lanegan reflected on his drug-taking past, getting sober, disagreements with former band members and his famously turbulent time on tour with Liam Gallagher, supporting Oasis.

In the interview, Lanegan also revealed how he was offered a much bigger role in Queens of the Stone Age.

“Josh [Homme] asked me to be the singer in the Queens before they made the first record,” he explained. “This is while the Trees were still supposedly together. I listened to it and thought: ‘I think it’s fantastic, but you need to be the singer of this thing.’”

Lanegan said it also coincided with him going into rehab. “Also, as it turned out,” he continued, “I was institutionalised for almost a year, so I missed out on the opportunity to sing on it.”

Lanegan later played on 2000’s ‘Rated R’ and 2002’s ‘Songs For The Deaf’. He continued: “Josh’s concept of having three singers seemed weird at the time but it was really great. I’m really proud of what we did with ‘Songs For The Deaf’. That line-up with Nick Oliveri, Josh and I was easily the most powerful band I’ve been in, ever.”

Lanegan’s 12th solo album, ‘Straight Songs Of Sorrow’ arrived in 2020 and served as a companion to his far-reaching memoir, Sing Backwards And Weep. NME gave the record a four-star review upon release, with writer Kevin EG Perry praising it as “open and viscerally honest” and “music that salves the soul”.

Mark Lanegan
Mark Lanegan CREDIT: Steve Gullick

Back in December, Lanegan released another memoir, Devil In A Coma.

Publisher Lee Brackstone said of the book: “Devil In A Coma is the latest work by a master of many forms, who has once again made art out of suffering and the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune. Unsparing – of both himself and the world we now find ourselves in – and grotesquely compelling, this book could not be more visceral and intense if it were written in blood.”

In the book, Lanegan detailed his near-death experience from COVID-19 via prose and poetry that he wrote while he was ill with the virus.

According to a press release, Lanegan went completely deaf after contracting coronavirus and, later, suffered cracked ribs and breathing problems. After being rushed to hospital, he spent months in bed, “slipping in and out of a coma” before beginning his recovery.

Last year, Lanegan also unveiled a new project with Joe Cardamone. Their collaborative project, Dark Mark vs. Skeleton Joe, unveiled details of their eponymous debut album.

Lanegan said that Dark Mark vs. Skeleton Joe was born out of his and Cardamone’s wishes to explore beyond the boundaries of the genres they’d previously dabbled in.

“The fact that it’s not like anything either one of us have done before is what makes this so interesting for me,” Lanegan said last year. “When you have done as much stuff as Joe and I, you have to constantly search for the different and challenging to keep yourself engaged.”

This is a breaking news story – more to follow 

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Check out the full list of Record Store Day 2022 releases

Hundreds of exclusive releases have been revealed for Record Store Day 2022, including records from the likes of Blur, Taylor Swift, Elvis, Bring Me The Horizon, Pinkpanthress, Sam Fender, Blondie and many more. Check out the full list below.

Returning for the 15th time on April 23, RSD will see hundreds of vinyl, CD and cassette releases sold exclusively through independent record shops – with over 260 stores from every corner of the UK and thousands around the world taking part in the celebrations.

This comes after the Entertainment Retailers Association’s recent report that showed that vinyl sales in the UK are at their highest level in over 30 years, growing a further 23 per cent year on year in 2021.

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Mina Koroma, store manager at Liverpool’s Jacaranda Records, said: “We can’t wait to see Record Store Day back in full force at Jacaranda Records. Our community of musicians, DJs and record fans thrives on getting together to share ideas and experiences.

“RSD is always a great chance to do that, especially at such a challenging time for shops like ours. We’re excited for scenes all over the UK to keep growing their collections and adding to their fond memories of times spent at record stores.”

Taylor Swift
Taylor Swift. CREDIT: Beth Garrabrant

Last month, Taylor Swift was announced as the first global amabassador of Record store Day 2022.

“I’m very proud to be this year’s Ambassador for Record Store Day. The places where we go to browse and explore and discover music new and old have always been sacred to me,” the singer explained. “Record stores are so important because they help to perpetuate and foster music-loving as a passion. They create settings for live events. They employ people who adore music thoroughly and purely.”

Swift went on to acknowledge the “rough few years” that independent record shops have faced as a result of the COVID pandemic, adding: “We need to support these small businesses more now than ever to make sure they can stay alive, stay eccentric, and stay individual.”

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The full list of Record Store Day 2021 releases is:

50 Foot Wave
Power + Light
Fire Records
LP

50 Foot Wave
Bath White
Fire Records
LP

A Place To Bury Strangers
Keep Slipping Away 2022
BMG
LP

A. R. Kane
Americana
Luaka Bop
2xLP

Academic, The
Community Spirit
Capitol
12″

Ace Of Base
All That She Wants
Demon Records
LP

Acid Mothers Temple & The Melting Paraiso UFO
Absolutely Freak Out! (Zap Your Mind)
staticresonance
2xLP

Ade
It’s Just Wind
Mexican Summer
LP

Alan Vega
Jukebox Babe b/w Speedway
Sacred Bones Records
7″

Albert Ayler
Revelations
Elemental Music
5xLP

Alice In Chains
We Die Young
Sony CMG
12″

Alpha & Omega
Tree Of Life – Volume 1
Mania Dub
LP

Alpha & Omega
Tree Of Life – Volume 2
Mania Dub
LP

Altered Images
The Return of The Teenage Popstar
Cooking Vinyl
12″

America
Rarities
Rhino
LP

Amy Michelle
is that all there is?
Method Records
12″

Andy Crofts & Le SuperHomard
Forevermore
Colorama
7″

Angelo Badalamenti
Blue Velvet – Original Motion Picture Soundtrack (Deluxe Edition)
Concord / UMG
2xLP

Art Blakey And The Jazz Messengers
In My Prime
Tidal Waves Music
2xLP

Art Pepper
Meets The Rhythm Section (MONO)
Concord / UMG
LP

Ashby
Looks Like You’ve Already Won
Marina Records
LP

ASIA
XXX
BMG
LP

Associates
Covers
BMG
LP

Azymuth
Light As A Feather (Picture Disc)
Far Out Recordings
LP

Bring Me The Horizon are among the artists to announce a special release for Record Store Day 2022. Credit: Press
Bring Me The Horizon are among the artists to announce a special release for Record Store Day 2022. CREDIT: Press

Bad Company
Live 1979
Rhino
2xLP

Barbara Mason
The Lost 80s Sessions
South Street
LP

Bardo Pond
Bufo Alvarius
Fire Records
2xLP

Be Bop Deluxe
Live! In the Air Age – The Hammersmith Odeon Concert 1977
ESOTERIC RECORDINGS
3xLP

Belinda Carlisle
The Heaven On Earth Tour
Demon Records
2xLP

Bell Biv Devoe
Poison
Get On Down
LP

Bernard Butler
People Move On: The B-Sides, 1998 + 2021
Demon Records
2xLP

Beth Orton
Central Reservation
Sony CMG
2xLP

Beth Orton
Trailer Park
Sony CMG
2xLP

Betty Harris
The Lost Queen Of New Orleans Soul
Soul Jazz Records
2LP

Biff Bang Pow!
Songs For The Sad Eyed Girl
Glass Modern
LP

Bill Evans
Inner Spirit: The 1979 Concert at the Teatro General San Martín, Buenos Aires
Resonance Records
2xLP

Bill Evans
Morning Glory: The 1973 Concert at the Teatro Gran Rex, Buenos Aires
Resonance Records
2xLP

Billy Bragg
Life’s A Riot With Spy vs Spy
Cooking Vinyl
LP

Birds, The
The Birds Ride Again
Flood Gallery
7″

Bleeding Hearts, The
Riches to Rags
Bar/None Records
LP

Blondie
Sunday Girl EP
UMC/Capitol
2 x 7″

Blur
“Bustin’ + Dronin’ ”
Parlophone
2×12″

Bobbi Humphrey
Baby Don’t You Know
Uno Melodic
12″

Bobby Hamilton Quintet Unlimited
Dream Queen
Now-Again Records
LP

Brian Bennett
Voyage (A Journey into Discoid Funk) (Limited Blue with Black Swirl Vinyl Edition)
Real Gone Music
LP

Brian Tyler
The Fast and Furious: Tokyo Drift – Original Score
Concord / UMG
2xLP

Bring Me The Horizon
2004 – 2013 – The Best Of
BMG
2xLP

Bruno Nicolai
La Dama Rossa Uccide Sette Volte (The Red Queen Kills Seven Times)
Decca/CAM Sugar
12″

Buena Vista Social Club
Ahora Me Da Pena
World Circuit
EP

Burning Hell, The
Nigel The Gannet
NineXNine
7″

Calvin Keys
Full Court Press
Tidal Waves Music
LP

Camera Obscura
Making Money (4AD B-Sides and Rarities)
4AD
LP

Carina Round
Carina Round – The Disconnection (Deluxe)
Do Yourself In
2xLP

Carlton Melton
Out To Sea (Sailed on Edition)
Agitated
2xLP

Ceyleib People, The
Tanyet
Jackpot Records
LP

Charles Mingus
The Lost Album From Ronnie Scott’s
Resonance Records
3xLP

Charlie Mitchell
After Hours / Love Don’t Come Easy
Janus
7″

Chet Baker
Live In Paris – The Radio France Recordings 1983-1984
Elemental Music
3xLP

Chicago
Chicago at Carnegie Hall, April 10, 1971
Rhino
3xLP

Childish Gambino
Kauai
Glassnote
LP

Chrissi
Back In The Day
Island/Listen Generously
10″

Christy Moore
Ride On
Rhino
LP

Coldharbourstores
Coldharbourstores REMIXED
Enraptured Records
LP

Collective Soul
Disciplined Breakdown
Concord / UMG
LP

Commander Venus
The Uneventful Vacation
Concord / UMG
LP

Coolio
It Takes a Thief
Tommy Boy Music
2xLP

Corinne Bailey Rae
The Sea
UMC/EMI
LP

Joseph Cotton
Zoom Zoom Shaka Tacka
Room In The Sky
LP

Cranberries, The
Remembering Dolores
UMC/Island
2xLP

Crass
Big A Little A / You’re Already Dead
One Little Independent Records
12″

The Cure
Pornography
UMC/Polydor
Picture Disc

Cypress Hill
How I Could Just Kill A Man
Sony CMG
10″

Dalis Car
The Waking Hour
Beggars Banquet
LP

Damned, The
Strawberries
BMG
LP

Dan Jones
OST Louis Theroux: My Scientology Movie
Wave Theory Records
LP

Dan Jones
OST Shadow of the Vampire
Wave Theory Records
LP

Dana Gillespie
Foolish Seasons
UMC/Decca
LP

Darlene Love
The Many Sides of Love—The Complete Reprise Recordings Plus!
Real Gone Music
LP

Dave Allen
DNA
Diggers Factory
LP

Dave Allen
The DNA of DMA
Themsay
12″

Dave Davies
Kinked
Green Amp Records / Red River Entertainment
LP

David Bowie
Brilliant Adventure
Parlophone
EP

David Bowie
Brilliant Adventure
Parlophone
CD

David Bowie
Toy E.P.
Parlophone
EP

David Bowie
Toy E.P.
Parlophone
CD

David J with Tim Newman
Analogue Excavations & Dream Interpretations Volume 1
Glass Modern
LP

David J with Tim Newman
Analogue Excavations & Dream Interpretations Volume 2
Glass Modern
LP

Kevin Davy & The Inn House Crew
Golden Brown (22 Medley)
Room In The Sky
7″

Deacon Blue
Raintown (35th anniversary)
Sony CMG
LP

Dead Famous People
Lost Person’s Area
Fire Archive
LP

Deadmau5
Vexillology
Play Records
2LP

Deadmau5
Full Circle
Play Records
2LP

Deep Heat
Do It Again / She’s A Junkie (Who’s The Blame)
Cu-Wu
7″

Def Leppard
High n Dry
UMC/Mercury
Picture Disc

Del Shannon
Rock On
Demon Records
LP

Delvon Lamarr Organ Trio
Live In Loveland!
Colemine Records
2xLP

Dermot Kennedy
Doves + Ravens
Island
LP

Dillinger Escape Plan
Dissociation
Cooking Vinyl
LP

Dio
Double Dose Of Donington – ’83 & ’87
Niji/BMG
LP

Dire Straits
40th Anniversary – Love Over Gold (half speed).
UMC/Mercury
LP

Disciples, The
Imperial Dub – Volume 1
Mania Dub
LP

Disciples, The
Imperial Dub – Volume 2
Mania Dub
LP

DJ Cam
Diggin
Attytude Records
12″

DJ Fresh
Gold Dust
BBK
12″

Doctor Who
Dead Air
Demon Records
2xLP

Donna Summer
Donna Summer
Driven By The Music
LP

Doors, The
L.A. Woman Sessions
Rhino
4xLP

Dudu Lima & João Bosco
O Ronco Da Cuíca / Incompatibilidade De Gênios
Far Out Recordings
12″

Durand Jones & The Indications
Power to The People
Colemine Records
7″

Dusty Springfield
See All Her Faces 50th Anniversary
UMC/Mercury
2LP

Elvis is among the artists to have a special release announced for Record Store Day 2022. Credit: Press
Elvis is among the artists to have a special release announced for Record Store Day 2022. CREDIT: Press

E. Lundquist
Multiple Images
KingUnderground
LP

Echo & The Bunnymen
B-Sides & Live (2001 – 2005)
Demon Records
2xLP

Elaine Mai
Home (Vinyl Edition)
Eva Magical Music Sounds
LP

Electrified A.G.B.
Fly Away / Fly Away – Inst
Dome City
12″

Electronic
Remix Mini album
Rhino
LP

Elton John
The Complete Thom Bell Sessions
UMC/Mercury
LP

Elvis Presley
Blondes, Brunes & Rousses (It Happened At The World’s Fair)
LMLR
LP

Elvis Presley
Les Disques En Or D’Elvis (Elvis’ Golden Record)
LMLR
3xLP

Emerson, Lake & Palmer
Trilogy
BMG
LP

Engineers, The
Folly
Music On Vinyl
10″

Ennio Morricone
Una pistola per Ringo / Il ritorno di Ringo OST
BTF
LP

Ennio Morricone
Trio Infernale
Rustblade
LP

Ennio Morricone/Chet Baker
I know I Will Lose You
Moochin’ About
10″

Ennio Morricone
Sans Mobile Apparent
Wewantsounds
LP

Erasure
Ne:Ep
Mute
12″

Erika de Casier
The Sensational Remixes
4AD
LP

Esther Marrow
Sister Woman
Concord / UMG
LP

Eunice Collins
At The Hotel
Mod-Art
7″

Everlast
Whitey Ford Sings the Blues
Tommy Boy Music
2xLP

Everly Brothers
Hey Doll Baby
Rhino
LP

Everything But The Girl
Night And Day (40th Anniversary Edition)
CHERRY RED RECORDS
EP

Farm, The
Groovy Train
BMG
12″

Fatboy Slim
Praise You / Right Here Right Now Remixes
BMG / Skint
LP

Field Music
Plumb
Memphis Industries
LP

Fir-Ya
Crying In Iran / Keep On Tryin’
Star-Glow
7″

Flame N’ King & The Bold Ones
Ain’t Nobody Jivein’ (Get Up Get Down) /Ho Happy Days
N.Y.C.S.
7″

Flash & The Dynamics
The New York Sound
Concord / UMG
LP

Fragma
Toca
Front Of House Recordings
LP

Frankie and the Witch Fingers
Frankie and the Witch Fingers
Greenway Records
LP

Frankie Goes to Hollywood
Altered Reels
UMC
LP

Freddie Hubbard
Music Is Here – Live At Maison de la Radio (ORTF), Paris 1973
Wewantsounds
2xLP

Frightened Rabbit
A Frightened Rabbit EP
Atlantic
12″

Frightened Rabbit
State Hospital
Atlantic
12″

Fun Boy Three
The Best of
Chrysalis Records
LP

Future
DS2
Sony CMG
LP

Future Sound of London, The
Rituals
FSOL Digital
LP

Future Utopia
12 Questions After Dark
70Hz Recordings
LP

Fuzzy Haskins
Radio Active
Tidal Waves Music
LP

Elvis is among the artists to have a special release announced for Record Store Day 2022. Credit: Press
BRITs Critics Choice winner Holly Humberstone is taking part in Record Store Day 2022. CREDIT: Press

G.B.H.
City Baby Attacked By Rats
BMG
LP

Gabriels
Bloodlines EP
Parlophone

Gerard Way
Hesitant Alien
Warner Records
LP

Giant Giant Sand (Giant Sand)
Tucson (Deluxe edition)
Fire Archive
3xLP

Ginger Wildheart
Potatoes & You
Round Records
CD

Glass Animals
I Don’t Wanna Talk (I Just Wanna Dance)
Polydor
12″

Go West
Bangs & Crashes
Chrysalis Records
2xLP

Go! Team, The
Proof of Youth
Memphis Industries
LP

Gojira
Live at Brixton
Rhino
2xLP

Golden Smog
On Golden Smog
Rhino
LP

Gong
In the 70’s
LMLR
2xLP

Gorgon City
Olympia – Remixes
EMI
12″

Graham Parker
Five Old Souls (Live)
100% Records
LP

Grand Wizard Theodore, The Fantastic Romantic 5
Can I Get A Soul Clap ‘Fresh Out Of The Pack
Soul-O-Wax Inc
7″

Grateful Dead
Wembley Empire Pool, London, England 4/8/72 (Live)
Rhino
5xLP

Grouch, The
Show You The World
The Grouch Music
2xLP

Groundhogs, The
Hogwash
Fire Records
2xLP

Guitar Ray
You’re Gonna Wreck My Life / I Am Never Gonna Break His Rules Again
Shagg
7″

Gun Club, The
Live At The Hacienda ’83
LMLR
LP

Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds are among the artists to have a special release announced for Record Store Day 2022. Credit: Press
Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds are among the artists to have a special release announced for Record Store Day 2022. CREDIT: Press

Halestorm
Back From The Dead
Atlantic
7″

Handsome Boy Modeling School
So…How’s Your Girl?
Tommy Boy Music
2xLP

Happy Mondays
Uncle Dysfunktional (2020 Mix)
London Records
12″

Harry Stone
Debut EP (Title TBC)
Capitol
12″

Heartbreakers
the L.A.M.F demo sessions
Jungle Records
LP

Hefner
Maida Vale
Where Its At Is Where You Are
LP

High Contrast
True Colours
Highly Contrasting
12″

Holly Humberstone
The Walls Are Way Too Thin
Polydor
12″

Home Boy And The C.O.L.
Home Boy And The C.O.L.
Tidal Waves Music
LP

Howard McGhee Quintet, The
Title Music From The Connection
Ikon
LP

Human League, The
The League Unlimited Orchestra
UMC
LP

Human League, The
Don’t You Want Me (Purple Disco Machine Extended Remix)
Positiva / EMI
12″

Ian Dury & The Blockheads
Ten More Turnips From The Tip
BMG
LP

Iggy Pop
Berlin 91
LMLR
2xLP

III Most Wanted
Calm Down
The Fever
7″

Ike & Tina Turner
The Soul Of Tina Turner
South Street
LP

Inn House Crew, The
Luanda
Room In The Sky
7″

Jacka, The
Tear Gas
The Artist Records
2xLP

Pixies are among the acts with releases for Record Store Day 2022. Credit: Press
Pixies are among the acts with releases for Record Store Day 2022. CREDIT: Press

James Blake
Covers
Polydor/Republic US
12″

Jamie Jones
Don’t You Remember The Future
Crosstown Rebels
2×12″

Jasmine Minks, The
The Jasmine Minks
Glass Modern
LP

Jazz Sabbath
Vol. 2
Blacklake
LP+DVD

Jefferson Airplane
Jefferson Airplane Live at The Monterey International Pop Festival
The Monterey International Pop Festival Foundation
12″

JennyLee
Heart Tax
Jenny’s Recordings
LP

Jessie Ware
Devotion (The Gold Edition) – 10th anniversary
UMC/Island
2xLP

Jesus Jones
Scratched – Unreleased Rare Tracks & Remixes
Demon Records
2xLP

Jimmy James & The Vagabonds / Sonya Spence
This Heart Of Mine/Let Love Flow On
Deptford Northern Soul Club Records
7″

Jo Dog and Paul Black’s Sonic Boom
Everyone Rains On My Parade
Black City Records
LP

Joan Jett & The Blackhearts
Acoustics
Sony CMG
LP

John Murry
The Graceless Age
Rubyworks
LP

John Williams
The Cowboys – Original Soundtrack
Concord / UMG
2xLP

John Williams
Lost In Space: Title Themes from the Hit TV Series
Spacelab9
LP

Johnny Marr
Spirit Power & Soul (Vince Clarke Remix)
BMG
12″

Jon Hopkins
Contact Note
Just Music
LP

Jonathan Richman and The Modern Lovers
Modern Lovers 88
Concord / UMG
LP

Joni Mitchell
Blue 50: Demos, Outtakes And Live Tracks From Joni Mitchell Archives, Vol. 2
Rhino
LP

Jonny Trunk
The A Z Of British Record Shop Bags
TRUNK
BOOK

Joss Stone
LP1
Surfdog Records Inc.
12″

Joyce with Mauricio Maestro
Feminina
Far Out Recordings
12″

Jungle Brothers, The
Jimbrowski / On The Run
Warlock
7″

Karen Dalton
Shuckin’ Sugar
Delmore Recording Society, INC
LP

Kate Havnevik
Melankton
Continentica Records
2xLP

Kathryn Williams
Introduction
One Little Independent Records
LP

Katy J Pearson
Waiting For The Day
Heavenly Recordings
LP

Keane
Keane
Island
10”

Keith Richards
Talk Is Cheap/Live At The Palladium – Double Cassette
Mindless Records
Double Cassette

Kenny Lynch
Half The Day’s Gone and We Haven’t Earne’d a Penny [Album]
Satril
LP

Kevin Rowland
My Beauty
CHERRY RED RECORDS
12”

Kinks, The
Waterloo Sunset
BMG
12″

Kirk Hammett
Portals
Blackened Recordings
12″ EP & CD

Kraan
Psychedelic Man
36 Music
LP

The Rolling Stones are among the acts with releases for Record Store Day 2022. Credit: Press
The Rolling Stones are among the acts with releases for Record Store Day 2022. CREDIT: Press

L’Impératrice
Vanille Fraise
Microqlima
12″

La Femme
Paradigmes : Suppléments
Disque Pointu
LP

La Luz
La Luz – Instrumentals
Hardly Art
LP

Lady Blackbird
Did Somebody Make A Fool Outta You/It’s Not That Easy
Foundation Music
7″

Las Vegas Connection
Running Back To You / Can’t Nobody Love Me Like You Do
Hep’ Me
7″

Laura Nyro
Trees Of The Ages: Laura Nyro Live In Japan
Omnivore
LP

Les Baxter
Que Mango
Vinyl Exotica
LP

Lester Tipton/ Edward Hamilton
This Won’t Change/Baby Don’t You Weep
Deptford Northern Soul Club Records
7″

Levellers, The
Zeitgeist (Picture Disc)
On The Fiddle
LP

Lida Husik
Fly Stereophonic
Tongue Master
LP

Linda Hoover
I Mean To Shine
Omnivore
LP

Lou Reed
I’m So Free: 1971 RCA Demos
Sony CMG
LP

Lou Reed and Kris Kristofferson
The Bottom Line Archive Series: In Their Own Words: With Vin Scelsa (3LP)
THE BOTTOM LINE RECORD COMPANY
3xLP

Luciano Luciani Y Sus Mulatos
Mulata Vamos A La Salsa
Vampisoul
LP

Luke Haines, Peter Buck and Jacknife Lee
Wild Companion (The Beat Poetry For Survivalists Dubs)
CHERRY RED RECORDS
12″

Lumineers, The
Brightside (acoustic)
Decca
12″

Maccabees
Colour It In
UMC
LP

Madness
Baggy Trousers
BMG
12″

Madonna
Who’s That Girl / Causing a Commotion 35th Anniversary
Rhino
12″

Mal-One
It’s All Punk Dub
Punk Art
LP

Mansun
Attack Of The Grey Lantern
Kscope
LP

Marco Beltrami
Mimic – Original Soundtrack
Concord / UMG
LP

Maria McKee
Peddlin’ Dreams
AFAR
LP

Mariah Carey
#1’s
Sony CMG
LP

Marta Acuna
Dance Dance Dance
P&P
7″

Mary Lou Lord
She’d Be A Diamond
Fire Records
2xLP

Max Roach
We Insist!
Candid/Exceleration
2xLP

Meier, Dieter/The Young Gods
Schüüfele / Did You Miss Me (Dub Spencer & Trance Hill Remixes)
Echo Beach
7″

Melanie C
Northern Star
UMC/EMI
2xLP

Metronomy
Posse EP Volume 1
Because Music
12”

Michael Chapman
The Man Who Hated Mornings
Mooncrest
LP

Mike Oldfield
Tubular Bells II
Rhino
LP

Mikey Dread
The Gun / Jah Jah Style
Music On Vinyl
10″

Miles Davis
Live In Montreal, July 7, 1983
Sony CMG
2xLP

Moons, The
Stand With Me
Colorama
7″

Morcheeba
Blackest Blue The Remixes
Fly Agaric Records
12″

Motorhead
The Lost Tapes Vol.2
BMG
2xLP

Muffs, The
New Improved Kim Shattuck Demos
Omnivore
LP

mxmtoon
true colors (from Life is Strange)
mxmtoon
LP

NEIKED x Mae Muller x Polo G
Better Days
Capitol
12″

Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds
Live Seeds
BMG / Mute
2xLP

Nick Lowe
Wireless World (Transparent Green with Black Sweirl Vinyl)
Yep Roc Records
LP

Nick Mono
The Sun Won’t Stay After Summer
Parlophone
7″

Nico
Camera Obscura
Beggars Banquet
LP

Night Beats
Valentine Sessions
Cooking Vinyl
LP

Nightingales, The
Hysterics
Call of the Void
2xLP

Nirvana (1965)
Secrets
Madfish
LP

Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds
Magic Secrets 2022
Sour Mash Records
7″

Nova Cheq & Samurai Breaks
HOOVERSOUND PRESENTS: Nova Cheq & Samurai Breaks
HOOVERSOUND RECORDINGS
12″

Offspring, The
Greatest Hits
Round Hill
LP

Opeth
My Arms Your Hearse
Candlelight Records
LP

OST John Barry
The Tamarind Seed
Silva Screen
2xLP

OST John Carpenter
Escape From New York (main Theme)
Silva Screen
7″

OST Mark Isham
The Hitcher
Silva Screen
LP

OST Ronald Binge
Sailing By (Theme from BBC Radio 4 Shipping forecast)
Vinyl Exotica
7″

Otto Kentrol
No Mistakes
Modern Harmonic
2xLP

Paradise Lost
Gothic live at Roadburn 2016
Paradise Lost
12″

Patti Smith
Curated by Record Store Day
Sony CMG
LP

Paul Butterfield Blues Band, The
The Original Lost Elektra Sessions
Run Out Groove
3xLP

Paul McCartney
Women and Wives
EMI
12″

Pearl Jam
Live On Two Legs
Sony CMG
2xLP

Pearls Before Swine
The Exaltation of Tom Rapp
Earth Recordings
LP

Pete Townshend’s Deep End
Album title : Face The Face
Mercury Studios
LP

Peter Gabriel
Live Blood
Real World
LP

Peter Tosh
Complete Captured Live
Rhino
2xLP

Phil Lynott
The Philip Lynott Album
UMC/Mercury
LP

PinkPantheress
To Hell With It
Parlophone
12″

Pixies
Live From Coachella 2004
Demon Records
2xLP

Poliça
Give You The Ghost
Memphis Industries
LP

Pretty Reckless
Going To Hell
Cooking Vinyl
LP

Primal Scream
Shine Like Stars (Weatherall mix)
Sony CMG
12″

Prince
The Gold Experience Deluxe
Sony CMG
2xLP

Prince Lincoln Thompson The & Royal Rasses
Humanity
Burning Sounds
LP

Proclaimers, The
Sunshine on Leith (2011 Remaster)
Rhino
2xLP

Prodigy, The
The Day Is My Enemy Remix Album
Cooking Vinyl
LP

Super Furry Animals are among the acts with releases for Record Store Day 2022. Credit: Press
Super Furry Animals are among the acts with releases for Record Store Day 2022. CREDIT: Press

Ramones
The Sire LPs 1981-1989
Rhino
7xLP

Rationals, The
The Rationals
Prudential Music Group
LP

Ray Charles
Genius Loves Company (RSD Edition)
Tangerine/Exceleration
LP

Rebecca Vasmant
Dance Yourself Free EP
Tru Thoughts
12″

Reigning Sound
Memphis In June
Merge Records
LP

Rentals, The
The Midnight Socirty
Death Waltz Recording Co.
LP

Replacements, The
Unsuitable for Airplay: The Lost KFAI Concert
Rhino
2xLP

Residents, The
WARNING: UNINC (TITLE TBC) 1971-1972 Live and Unincorporated
NEW RALPH
2xLP

Rex Orange County
Apricot Princess 5 Year Anniversary Edition
Rex Orange County
2xLP

Rick Astley
Whenever You Need Somebody
BMG
LP

Rizzle Kicks
Stereo Typical
UMC/Island
LP

Rob
Rob (Funky Way)
Mr Bongo
LP

Robert Lester Folsom
Music and Dreams
Anthology
LP

Roddy Woomble
Architecture In LA / Atlantic Photography
A Modern Way
7″

Rolling Stones, The
More Hot Rocks (Big Hits & Fazed Cookies)
UMC/ABKCO
2xLP

Ron Sexsmith
Long Player Late Bloomer
Cooking Vinyl
LP

Rory Gallagher
San Diego ’74
UMC
2xLP

Ryan Hamilton
1221
Wicked Cool Records
12”

Sam Fender
Alright/The Kitchen (Live)
Polydor
7″

Sam Smith
Nirvana
Capitol
12″

Sampa The Great
Birds And The BEE9
Big Dada
LP

Sandie Shaw
Hand In Glove (w/The Smiths)
UMC
12″

Sandro Brugnolini
L’uomo da gli occhiali a specchio
BTF
LP

Sandy Denny
The Early Home Recordings
Earth Recordings
2xLP

Sandy Denny
Gold Dust Live At The Royalty
UMC/Island
LP

Santana
Splendiferous Santana
Sony CMG
LP

Sara Keys
Struck By Lightning
Atlantic
12″

Satan’s Pilgrims
Live At Jackpot Records
Jackpot Records
LP

Scott Walker
Boy Child
UMC
2xLP

Sea Girls
DNA
Polydor
7″

Sepultura
Revolusongs
BMG
LP

Shankar Family & Friends
I Am Missing You b/w Lust
Dark Horse Records
LP

Sheena Easton
The Definitive 12” Singles 1983-1987
CHERRY POP
2xLP

Shocking Blue
At Home – The Singles
Music On Vinyl
10″

Simon Fowler & Oscar Harrison
Live On The River Boat
Demon Records
2xLP

Simple Minds
5X5 Live
Demon Records
3xLP

Skunk Anansie
An Acoustic Skunk Anansie – Live in London
100% Records
12”

Sky’s The Limit
Don’t Be Afraid / Don’t Be Afraid – Inst
J.M.J
7″

Slade
Ballzy
BMG
LP

Slash
Live ! 4 (feat. Myles Kennedy and The Conspirators) (Live at Studios 60)
BMG
2xLP

Sleep Token
Sundowning
Spinefarm Records
LP

Soul Jazz Records Presents
Studio One Classics
Soul Jazz Records
2LP

Soul Jazz Records Presents
100% Dynamite
Soul Jazz Records
2LP

Sound, The
Counting The Days
Demon Records
2xLP

St. Vincent
The Nowhere Inn
Loma Vista Recordings
LP

Steve Earle
Up Against The Wall Redneck Mother / Night Rider’s Lament
New West
7″

Steve Hackett
The Tokyo Tapes
ESOTERIC ANTENNA
3xLP

Stevie Nicks
Bella Donna (Deluxe Edition) (2LP)
Rhino
2xLP

Stezo
To The Max / It’s My Turn
Sleeping Bag
7″

Stiff Little Fingers
BBC Live In Concert
Rhino
2xLP

Stone Broken
Ain’t Always Easy
Spinefarm Records
LP

Streets, The
ORIGINAL PIRATE MATERIAL BOXSET
LOCKED ON
LP

Suede
Sci Fi Lullabies
Demon Records
3xLP

Sugababes
Anniversary Remixes
London Records
12″

Sun Ra Arkestra
Babylon
In + Out Records
2xLP

Sun’s Signature
Sun’s Signature
Partisan Records
12″

Super Furry Animals
Rings Around The World, B-Sides
BMG
LP

Superchunk
Incidental Music 1991 – 1995
Merge Records
2xLP

Supergrass
Moving
BMG / Echo
12″

Suzanne Vega
Close Up
Cooking Vinyl
LP

Suzi Quatro
Suzi Quatro [Deluxe Edition]
Chrysalis Records
2xLP

Sweet
Platinum Rare VOL 2
Prudential Music Group
2xLP

T. Rex
The Slider
Demon Records
LP

Soul Jazz Records Presents
PUNK 45: I’m A Mess! D-I-Y Or Die! Art, Trash & Neon – Punk 45s In The UK 1977-78
Soul Jazz Records
2LP

Taylor Swift is among the acts with releases for Record Store Day 2022. Credit: Press
Taylor Swift is among the acts with releases for Record Store Day 2022. CREDIT: Press

Tangerine Dream
Alpha Centauri
ESOTERIC RECORDINGS
LP

Tangerine Dream
Live At Reims Cinema Opera (September 23rd, 1975)
LMLR
2xLP

Taylor Swift
the lakes
EMI
7″

Teenage Waitress
You Ain’t Got It Bad
Colorama
7″

Tegan & Sara
Still Jealous
Warner Records
12″

Terry Edwards And The Scapegoats
My Wife Doesn’t Understand Me
Sartorial Records
2xLP

Tesseract
Polaris
Kscope
LP

Thomas Dolby
Hyperactive
BMG
12″

Trevor Lucas
Overlander
Earth Recordings
LP

Tuff Crew
My Part of Town / Mountains World
Warlock
7″

Tyler Bates
OST Watchmen
Warner Records
3xLP

U2
A Celebration’
UMC/Island
12″

Ultravox!
Live at The Rainbow 1977
UMC/Island
LP

Undertones, The
The Love Parade
BMG
12″

UT
Griller
Out
LP

Van McCoy
The Hustle
Tommy Boy Music
12″

Various Artists
Franco Nero
17 North Parade
7″

Various Artists
De-Lite Soul
BMG / De-Lite
LP

Various Artists
PARALLAX VIEW PRINT SET
Cinema Paradiso
LP

Various Artists
Big Night – Original Soundtrack
Concord / UMG
LP

Various Artists
Go Ahead Punk…Make My Day
Concord / UMG
LP

Various Artists
Jazz Dispensary: Super Skunk
Concord / UMG
LP

Various Artists
The Wanderer – a tribute to Jackie Leven
Cooking Vinyl
2xLP

Various Artists
The Best Of Chi-Sound Records 1976-1984
Demon Records
2xLP

Various Artists
Breakin’: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
Get On Down
LP

Various Artists
Greensleeves Ganja Anthems
Greensleeves Records
LP

Various Artists
Earthbeat
Jumpin’ & Pumpin’
2xLP

Various Artists
Brazil 45 Vol.3 Curated By Kenny Dope
Mr Bongo
Boxset

Various Artists
Salutations
RVNG INT
LP

Various Artists
It’s A Rough Old Road To Travel – The Existential Psychodrama In Country Music (Volume II)
The Iron Mountain Analogue Research Facility.
LP

Various Artists
Hilbillies in Hell 13
The Iron Mountain Analogue Research Facility.
LP

Various Artists
Soul Power ’68
Trojan Records
LP

Various Artists
Love Is All I Bring
Trojan Records
2xLP

Verticle Lines
Beach Boy/Beach Boy – Inst
Tuff City
12″

Viktor Vaughn
Vaudeville Villain
Get On Down
2xLP

Vince Guaraldi Trio
Baseball Theme
Concord / UMG
7″

Virgin Prunes
Pagan Lovesong (40th Anniversary Edition)
BMG
LP

The Who are among the acts with releases for Record Store Day 2022. Credit: Press
The Who are among the acts with releases for Record Store Day 2022. CREDIT: Press

Walkmen, The
Lisbon – 10th Anniversary Edition
BELLA UNION
2xLP

Wallows
Singles Collection 2017 – 2020
Atlantic
LP

Warrior Soul
Odds & Ends
Prudential Music Group
12″

Weyes Blood
The Innocents
Mexican Summer
LP

Weyes Blood
A Certain Kind b/w Everybody’s Talkin’
Mexican Summer
7″

Who, The
Its Hard – 40th Anniversary Edition
UMC/Polydor
2xLP

Whole Darn Family, The
Seven Minutes of Funk/Ain’t Nothing But Something to Do
Tommy Boy Music
12″

Wild Willy Barrett
Alien Talk (that’s what it’s all about)
stuffNmuck
LP

Wildhearts, The
ADHD Rock
Graphite
10”

WIll and The People
WIll and The People
Smol Records
LP

Willie Nelson
Live at the Texas Opryhouse, 1974
Rhino
2xLP

Willie Tee
First Taste of Hurt /I’m Having so Much Fun
Gatur
7″

Willie Tee
Concentrate/Get Up
Gatur
7″

Winston Reedy, Joseph Cotton, Vin Gordon , Ansel
Boom Shacka Lacka
Room In The Sky
7″

Wipers
Over The Edge (Anniversary Edition)
Jackpot Records
2xLP

Wire
Not About To Die
Pinkflag
LP

Wye Oak
If Children
Merge Records
LP

post image

Uncut April 2022

HAVE A COPY SENT STRAIGHT TO YOUR HOME

Kate Bush​​, Nick Drake, Ronnie Spector, Fontaines D.C., Television’s Tom Verlaine, John McLaughlin, Slint, Aldous Harding, Cowboy Junkies, The Coral and all feature in the new Uncut, dated April 2022 and in UK shops from February 17 or available to buy online now. This issue comes with an exclusive free CD, comprising 15 tracks of the month’s best new music.

KATE BUSH: Donkeys and didgeridoos. Celtic ballads and ethno-pop. Harry Houdini and the Star Wars Cantina theme. Heady experimentation and creative freedom. Welcome to The Dreaming: Kate Bush’s “she’s gone mad” album – and the record that ushered in her imperial phase. “‘Wuthering Heights’ gave Kate licence to do what she wanted,” one eyewitness tells Peter Watts. “With The Dreaming, she took it as far as she could possibly go.”

OUR FREE CD! BLACKWATERSIDE: SOUNDS OF THE WEIRD NEW ALBION: 15 tracks from the 15 best new folk visionaries, including songs by Michael Tanner, The Left Outsides, Cath & Phil Tyler, Henry Parker, Rob St John, Burd Ellen, Waterless Hills and more.

This issue of Uncut is available to buy by clicking here – with FREE delivery to the UK and reduced delivery charges for the rest of the world.

Inside the issue, you’ll find:

NICK DRAKE: Nick Drake’s Pink Moon is 50 this month. To celebrate, Uncut has assembled friends, peers and acolytes – including Richard Thompson, Vashti Bunyan, Mark Eitzel, Joan Shelley and Joe Boyd – to explore favourite songs from the visionary singer-songwriter’s starkly beautiful swansong. Which will you love the best..?

RONNIE SPECTOR: One of the most distinctive voices in pop music fell silent last month – a combination of street toughness and tenderness, a trademark vibrato and raw, unschooled energy. First, Stephen Troussé pays tribute to Ronnie Spector, then – in an unpublished archive interview – Ronnie herself holds forth on her peerless run of 45s, hanging with The Beatles, the Boss and the New York punks and more. Finally, Nedra Talley-Ross, the last surviving Ronette, celebrates the life of her bandmate and cousin: “She was my breath.”

FONTAINES D.C.: From valiant outsiders to rock’n’roll heroes, Fontaines D.C. have learned to be true to themselves. But how will a move away from Dublin, their home city, impact on their long-held camaraderie? “We’re there in the corner, not really fitting in,” they tell Laura Barton.

TOM VERLAINE: Forty-five years on, Marquee Moon remains an unassailable classic. But what of Television’s guiding light, the elusive Tom Verlaine? Drawing on memories of exacting working methods, Froggy The Gremlin and Television’s unfinished fourth studio album, collaborators and bandmates separate fact from friction. “He’s remained true to himself over all the years,” hears Rob Hughes, “He’s following his instincts.”

JOHN MCLAUGHLIN: A virtuoso visionary, John McLaughlin has steered his music into some very heavy places. He gave lessons to Jimmy Page, helped Miles Davis go electric, communed with Alice Coltrane and pioneered a monumental new sound with his own Mahavishnu Orchestra. But what lies behind his tireless quest for transcendence? “I wanted to make music that takes you into the stratosphere,” he tells John Lewis.

SLINT: The making of “Good Morning Captain”.

AMON DÜÜL II: Album by album with the German rock band.

ALDOUS HARDING: A hard act to follow: outsider artist forces the doors of perception.

CLICK TO GET THE NEW UNCUT DELIVERED TO YOUR DOOR

In our expansive reviews section, we take a look at new records from Midlake, Judy Collins, Carson McHone, The Weather Station, Andy Bell, Binker & Moses, Duncan Marquiss, and more, and archival releases from Son House, The Coral, Tinariwen, Irma Thomas, Ornette Coleman and others. We catch IDLES and The Smile live; among the films, DVDs and TV programmes reviewed are Paris, 13th District, Flee, The Real Charlie Chaplin, Red Rocket and The Duke; while in books there’s David Bowie and Fat White Family.

Our front section, meanwhile, features Shane MacGowan, Loney Hutchins, Sarah Records, Ano Nobo Quartet and Jeremy Ivey, while, at the end of the magazine, Judy Collins reveals the records that have soundtracked her life.

You can pick up a copy of Uncut in the usual places, where open. But otherwise, readers all over the world can order a copy from here.

CLICK TO GET THE NEW UNCUT DELIVERED TO YOUR DOOR

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The Who’s Pete Townshend seems to be making a new solo album

Almost three decades on from the 1993 release of ‘Psychoderelict’, Pete Townshend – best known as the founding guitarist and singer for The Who – seems to be working on a new body of solo material.

  • READ MORE: The Who – ‘WHO’ review: 13 years since their last album, this stands up alongside their classics

Over the weekend, Townshend was spotted in the studio with session bassist Guy Pratt (whose portfolio includes work with Pink Floyd, Madonna, The Smiths and more) and drummer Ged Lynch (a longtime collaborator of Peter Gabriel). The former posted a photo of the trio on Twitter, writing: “To say the last couple of days recording has been beyond magical would be an understatement.”

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Townshend’s most recent efforts as a solo artist came in 2015, when the new songs ‘Guantanamo’ and ‘How Can I Help You’ featured on the compilation album ‘Truancy: The Very Best Of Pete Townshend’. 

More recently, the artist has kept busy with The Who – in 2019, the group (as a duo, comprising Townshend and frontman Roger Daltrey) released their first album since 2006, simply titled ‘WHO’. Townshend teased a followed-up last February, but later conceded that he “doesn’t know” when a 13th album will materialise.

Daltrey, for his part, said last March that he was reluctant to make another album with The Who, because there isn’t a “record market anymore”.

In a four-star review of ‘WHO’, NME’s Mark Beaumont said the record “either recaptures the band’s root ferocity or explores new territory with style”. He noted that “much of the record could stand proudly alongside [The Who’s] classics”, citing ‘All This Music Must Fade’, ‘Hero Ground Zero’ and ‘Detour’ as particular highlights. 

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Watch Kamasi Washington perform his new single ‘The Garden Path’ on ‘The Tonight Show’

Kamasi Washington has made his late night television debut with a performance of his new single ‘The Garden Path’ on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon.

The saxophonist appeared on the show earlier this week, performing the track live with an impressive accompanying ensemble. The lineup included a flutist, trumpeter, trombonist, various drummers, singers, pianist, and more, helping bring Washington’s ‘The Garden Path’ to life.

Watch the feverish performance below.

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Speaking of the new song in a press release, Washington said: “The world feels turned upside down.”

“There’s so much push and pull in every direction, from everyone you meet—no one knows what to think, who to believe, or how to approach life right now. No matter how smart you are, it’s hard not to feel blind.”

It’s the first new song from the musician this year, and follows on from 2021’s ‘Sun Kissed Child’. He also released a cover of Metallica‘s ‘My Friend of Misery’ last September as part of the rock outfit’s ‘The Metallica Blacklist’ covers album.

Washington also appeared at a Thundercat show in Los Angeles last November, joining other special musical guests including Haim, Flying Lotus, Ty Dolla $ign and more.

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Robyn cancels Way Out West, Bergen Fest and PiPfest headline performances

Robyn has announced that she’s had to pull out of headlining upcoming festivals Way Out West, Bergen Fest and PiPfest.

  • READ MORE: The Big Read – Robyn: “I danced a lot on my own”

The Swedish singer-songwriter took to Twitter earlier today (February 1) to break the news.

“It is an understatement to say that I was looking forward to headlining at Way Out West, Pip and Bergen Fest this summer, but circumstances have shifted and I unfortunately won’t be able to for this year. I’m so sorry about this,” she wrote.

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In a follow-up tweet, Robyn cushioned the blow for fans by updating them on the status of her new music.

“But there are many exciting things to come and even though it is taking a little longer, I can’t wait to reunite with you as soon as my new album is ready,” she wrote. “I’ve missed playing for you so much and I’m still planning to go back on tour as soon as I can. All my love, Robyn.”

Robyn’s last new music was last October’s ‘Call My Name’, her collaboration with Swedish duo Smile.

“I love singing ‘Call My Name’, and it was a true pleasure to record it and rave around in this beautiful song together with Joakim and Björn,” Robyn said of the track at the time of its release.

Smile – comprising Björn Yttling (Peter, Björn and John) and Joakim Åhlund (Teddybears, Caesars) – dropped their latest album, ‘Phantom Island’, back in November via Chimp Limbs.

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Robyn and Åhlund have previously collaborated together on the former’s albums ‘Robyn’ (2005) and ‘Body Talk’ (2010).

Elsewhere, Lorde has discussed Robyn‘s influence on her career and the cameo the Swedish singer made on her new album ‘Solar Power’.

In a recent interview with NME, Lorde talked about how Robyn’s emotional intelligence as a songwriter has impacted her.

“I think there’s just so much room in Robyn’s world for being a hot mess or being this sort of ball of emotions shooting out in every direction,” Lorde told NME.

“I think about a song like ‘Call Your Girlfriend’ – she’s not in a traditional hero’s role; she’s telling someone to break up with their girlfriend so they can be with her. But she’s also having a huge amount of empathy for that other woman – that is some really big, complex adult shit to be tackling in a dancefloor banger!”

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Musicians defend Taylor Swift after Damon Albarn says she “doesn’t write her own songs”

Figures from the music world have come out to defend Taylor Swift after Damon Albarn claimed that she “doesn’t write her own songs”.

During a recent interview with the Los Angeles Times, the Blur and Gorillaz frontman explained that Swift’s “co-writing” approach is at odds with his “traditionalist” view of songwriting.

  • READ MORE: Taylor Swift – ‘Red (Taylor’s Version)’ review: a retread of heartbreak

When the LA Times journalist put it to him that Swift was “an excellent songwriter”, Albarn responded: “She doesn’t write her own songs.”

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He went on to say that co-writing “doesn’t count”, adding: “I’m not hating on anybody, I’m just saying there’s a big difference between a songwriter and a songwriter who co-writes. Doesn’t mean that the outcome can’t be really great.”

Swift later responded to Albarn’s comments, tweeting: “@DamonAlbarn I was such a big fan of yours until I saw this.

“I write ALL my own songs. Your hot take is completely false and SO damaging. You don’t have to like my songs but it’s really fucked up to try and discredit my writing. WOW.”

Damon Albarn and Taylor Swift
Damon Albarn; Taylor Swift (Picture: Roberto Ricciuti/Redferns; Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame)

Albarn subsequently apologised “unreservedly and unconditionally” to Swift, claiming that his words had been “reduced to clickbait”. He said: “The last thing I would want to do is discredit your songwriting. I hope you understand.”

Elsewhere, Swift’s recent collaborators Jack Antonoff and Aaron Dessner – who both worked with the singer on ‘Folklore’ and ‘Evermore’ – criticised Albarn for his comments. “If you were there…cool…go off,” Antonoff tweeted. “If not…maybe…shut the fuck up?”

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Dessner, meanwhile, said he was “not sure” why Albarn would attempt “to discredit Taylor’s brilliant songwriting”.

“As someone who has gotten to press record around her… your statements couldn’t be further from the truth,” he continued. “You’re obviously completely clueless as to her actual writing and work process.”

Albarn has since faced a backlash from fans and musicians alike, with The Anchoress, Maisie Peters, The Subways and Jedward among those to have aired their support for Swift on social media.

Beginning a lengthy Twitter thread, The Anchoress wrote: “Every woman in the music industry has encountered some shade of this.

“If I had a £ for every time my production was attributed to some guy or I avoided doing a co-write because this is how it shakes down if you ever DARE to collaborate. It’s so YAWN. Also, men, do your research.”

She continued: “It is a distinctly male privilege to be allowed to explore your creativity via collaboration and not have it assumed that a lack of talent or skill drove the decision. Imagine applying the same judgement to Bowie? A master collaborator that chose his comrades well at every turn.

“Some days I honestly don’t know if I cam face making another record. It’s a lonely business doing it all yourself because if you don’t then it will be credited to someone else. So many female creators I know feel the same.”

The Anchoress added: “Damon Albarn’s attitude towards female authorship (and that IS the subtext of his nonsense) is the same reason only 2 per cent of producers are female, & why many women eventually exit the industry completely. It’s like death by a thousand paper-cuts. It’s exhausting.”

In a string of tweets, Self Esteem wrote: “Why is what male musicians think of female musicians a talking point? They should only let musicians say what they mean 5 times a year anyway me included I say the same shit every time.”

Maisie Peters commented: “Taylor Swift could write ‘Song 2’ but Damon Albarn could never write All Too Well 10 minute version.”

Elsewhere, The Subways said: “Honestly, the number of dudes in this industry who have songs written for them (don’t ask) and no-one makes a peep about it. But women? Consistently undermined for their contributions on and off the stage/in the studio. Why? The patriarchy.”

The group went on to hail Swift as being “the real deal. Fact”.

Jedward called Albarn’s apology “fake AF”. “You said what you said! you are degrading,” they continued. “Hope you understand – Jedward.” Replying to Swift’s tweet, the duo wrote: “Will go to [Albarn’s] show tonight with a Taylor Swift poster his solo album is a complete Blur and should be titled full of skips.”

Liam Gallagher – who previously described Swift’s ‘1989’ single ‘Shake It Off’ as a “fucking tune” – was asked by a fan on Twitter to share his thoughts on the “beef” between Albarn and Swift.

“Love it,” the former Oasis frontman replied, while saying that the two artists are both “great songwriter[s]”. You can see those interactions below.

After making the controversial comments, Albarn told the LA Times that he’s “more attracted to” the “darker” songwriting of Billie Eilish and Finneas, which he said was “less endlessly upbeat” than Swift’s.

“Way more minor and odd,” he continued. “I think [Eilish is] exceptional.”

Albarn was speaking to the publication ahead of his concert at Los Angeles’ Walt Disney Concert Hall last night (January 24). He was performing in support of his recent solo album ‘The Nearer The Fountain, More Pure The Stream Flows’.

He’ll also showcase the record at an intimate show in London next month, taking to the stage at the Troxy on February 20 for the BRITs Week 2022 gig series. Later next month, the musician will perform at London’s Barbican Hall.

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Watch Elvis Costello perform impromptu medley of songs on ‘Colbert’

Elvis Costello stopped by The Late Show With Stephen Colbert on Friday night (January 21) to deliver a pair of performances including an impromptu medley.

  • READ MORE: Mark, My Words: my weird weekend of gigging on the edge of lockdown

The singer-songwriter released ‘The Boy Named If’ – his new album with The Imposters – last week (January 14), which features the singles ‘Farewell, OK’, ‘Magnificent Hurt’ and ‘Paint The Red Rose Blue’.

The Imposters are comprised of Steve Nieve (keyboards), Pete Thomas (drums) and Davey Faragher (bass/backing vocals).

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During Costello’s appearance on the US late night chat show, he and the band performed a standalone rendition of ‘Magnificent Hurt’ followed by a surprise medley that combined ‘Farewell, OK’ and his 1978 cover of Nick Lowe’s ‘(What’s So Funny ‘Bout) Peace, Love, And Understanding’.

You can check out Costello’s performances below:

In addition to the performances, Costello sat down with Colbert for a three-part interview which saw him discuss the new album, working with Paul McCartney, Peter Jackson’s recent Beatles documentary Get Back, defending Olivia Rodrigo and more. You can see his chat with Colbert below.

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Produced by Sebastian Krys and Costello, and released on EMI, ‘The Boy Named If’ – the full title of which is actually said to be ‘The Boy Named If (And Other Children’s Stories)’ – was released on CD, vinyl, cassette, download and streaming. There were also some numbered and signed, 88-page “Hardback Storybook Edition” versions.

Costello and the band recently announced that they’ll be heading out on a UK tour in support of the new album. ‘The Boy Named If’ tour kicks off at the Brighton Dome on June 5, 2022 before wrapping up at London’s Hammersmith Eventim Apollo on June 23. Charlie Sexton will also join Costello and co. on the 13-date tour.

Support comes from Ian Prowse, who will be performing songs from his upcoming album ‘One Hand On The Starry Plough’.

 

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Pete Doherty and Frédéric Lo on how French serenity and being drug-free shaped their new album

Pete Doherty and collaborator Frédéric Lo have shared the single ‘You Can’t Keep It From Me Forever’ as well as announcing details of their new album ‘The Fantasy Life of Poetry & Crime’. Check it out below, along with our interview with the duo.

  • MORE: Watch The Libertines show us around their new Margate Hotel, The Albion Rooms

Having previously shared the title track, now The Libertines/Babyshambles man and the French musician, musical director, composer, arranger, music producer and singer-songwriter preview their upcoming album (due for release in March) with the summer-ready track ‘You Can’t Keep It From Me Forever’ – which Doherty said was inspired by his now drug-free lifestyle and the pair’s love of classic indie-pop.

“It reminded me a little bit of early Morrissey or some of the early Suede stuff, with an old-school catchy guitar,” Doherty told NME. “I never get bored of singing this song. I’m really going to enjoy singing it live. There’s just something so uplifting about it.”

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Asked about the lyrical inspiration, Doherty replied: “I suppose it’s a not-even subconscious yearning for things. I’ve been clean since December 2019, so at the time of writing this I was really white-knuckling it with the drugs and feeling like would only be a matter of time before I went back to it. It hasn’t turned out to be that way, but there was that kind of kicking out at the new way of being clean and feeling like it was temporary. You can apply that to any kind of yearning, but to me it was specifically about that. Time passed, and I’ve managed to somehow keep on the straight and narrow, if it is indeed straight and narrow.

“That’s the honest answer, but it seems silly to give that answer now, though. If it really was such a necessity then I would have just gone out and used. I suppose this is just a smarmy, self-sabotaging sort of thing, but just in the role of a narrator.”

Lo, most notably known for his work with Pony Pony Run Run, Stephan Eicher, Maxime Le Forestier, Christophe Honoré and Alex Beaupain, first met Doherty in the summer of 2020 when he asked him to record a cover for a tribute album to his late collaborator, the acclaimed Frenc singer-songwriter Daniel Darc.

From there, Doherty said that he naturally found himself writing lyrics for pieces of music that Lo had written. Within six months, a whole album had been written during lockdown before being recorded at Cateuil in Étretat in Normandy and Studio Water Music in Paris.

“It was really natural,” Lo told NME. “It was the end of summer in beautiful sun, and we worked in a beautiful house in Normandy. We just kept writing songs until we had a whole album. Peter didn’t want to pay guitar, so I played guitar, bass and keyboard and recorded a French drummer with one of the biggest orchestras in Paris. It really was something special.”

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As well as being two years clean, Doherty also recently got married to his Puta Madres bandmate Katia de Vidas. Asked if wedded bliss had added to the upbeat tone of the new material, Doherty told us: “Maybe. I wasn’t married when I was writing the record, but I was in a married state! I was monogamous, very much in love and cocooned and in a relationship. It wasn’t about the highs and lows of sprawling adult romances.”

He continued: “It’s more turning inward. A lot of it was inspired by films and the few years I was in Margate before I ended up in lockdown in Normandy and then completely separated from England and from addiction. I was getting clean. I suppose there was just so much recklessness for such a long period of time and not really caring what anyone else thought that it reverses and all of a sudden you go from having no pressure to being hyper-sensitively aware of this new expectation.

“I think the creative process is like an addiction in itself. I need to write songs, and I’ve never really got to the bottom of it.”

Peter Doherty & Frédéric Lo. Credit: Nicolas Despis
Peter Doherty & Frédéric Lo. Credit: Nicolas Despis

As well as the personal nature of the lyrics, Doherty said he was also inspired by local fables and mythology from his new home of Normandy (such as the story of Arsène Lupin, the gentleman thief) to create what he has described as some of his best work to date.

“I think I tried with all my heart with the lyrics on this album,” he said. “I really saw it as a challenge and a necessity to get them written. I feel like the melodies and the songs that Frederic had for me to write lyrics to were so strong that they needed a huge effort on my part.”

Lo agreed: “For the first tracks we wrote together, we felt something really huge and really strong. We were like forever friends. It was really strange. I loved Peter’s lyrics and the way he writes. It’s really modern and post-modern. I love Oscar Wilde and The Smiths, and Peter’s work is so expressive. I knew when I offered him some tunes that it was good material, so it was like one plus one equals three.

“We were like a songwriting duo, and we loved that because we were talking a lot about The Smiths, The Clash and The Beatles. When Peter screams on this album, it’s a little bit like a John Lennon style, and I’m playing this music like ‘60s pop tunes.”

The duo are planning on playing a gig for ARTE Live on French and German TV before a full tour follows in April and May – having already performed some low-key spontaneous live shows at some local cafes while recording the album in France.

“It’s absolutely essential to play these songs live,” said Doherty. “That’s what I’ve been longing to do since we wrote them. We just need to think about what musicians to use. Frederic did most of the recording with French musicians during various lockdowns, but it looks like we’re now going to merge various elements of The Puta Madres and Babyshambles to get a band together.”

He went on: “It’s really exciting to think about taking these songs on the road. The last Libertines tour, was amazing – I don’t think we’ve ever played so well – but we didn’t put any new songs in there. We’d played some new ideas on the bus and in rehearsals, but we didn’t trail any of them out live. That’s maybe something for the future. For the moment, this is what all my heart has gone into. I need to get these songs heard.”

Speaking of The Libertines, NME also asked Doherty about progress on the long-awaited follow-up to their 2015 album ‘Anthems For Doomed Youth‘. When Pete last spoke to NME about the new material back in 2019, he said it had an eclectic mix of styles in the same vein as The Clash’s ‘Sandinista’.

“That’s still the format that we’re talking about,” Doherty told NME this week of how it’s going. “At the end of the tour we did that ended last month, everyone was really upbeat by the fact that we were all still alive after the various quarantines and John coming and going. We were all really upbeat about the future, so I don’t know how or when it’s going to happen but I think it will.

“‘Sandinista’ still encapsulates it because there are still a lot of ideas. It’s just about getting everyone in a room and getting on with it.”

As well as upcoming shows in South America, The Libertines have also plotted some UK shows to celebrate the 20th anniversary of their debut album ‘Up The Bracket‘. Asked if the new spurt of activity might inspire the band to head into the studio and finish the record, Doherty replied: “I like to think so. There was one song that was getting finished called ‘Mustang’, which was a cracker and definitely up there with the greats. I kept saying, ‘Let’s do it tonight’, but everyone was more keen to hold back. I really hope you get to hear it all this year.”

Peter Doherty & Frédéric Lo announce the release of their new album ‘The Fantasy Life of Poetry & Crime’
Peter Doherty & Frédéric Lo announce the release of their new album ‘The Fantasy Life of Poetry & Crime’

‘The Fantasy Life Of Poetry & Crime’ will be released on March 18 via Doherty’s own Strap Originals label and is available to pre-order here. Check out the full tracklist below.

‘The Fantasy Life of Poetry & Crime’
‘The Epidemiologist’
‘The Ballad Of.’
‘You Can’t Keep It From Me Forever’
‘Yes I Wear A Mask’
‘Rock & Roll Alchemy’
‘The Monster’
‘Invictus’
‘The Glassblower’
‘Keeping Me On File’
‘Abe Wassenstein’
‘Far From The Madding Crowd’

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Bop Shop 2021 Favorites: Songs From Dawn Richard, Wet Leg, IU, And More

The search for the ever-elusive "bop" is difficult. Playlists and streaming-service recommendations can only do so much. They often leave a lingering question: Are these songs really good, or are they just new?

Enter Bop Shop, a hand-picked selection of songs from the MTV News team. This weekly collection doesn't discriminate by genre and can include anything — it's a snapshot of what's on our minds and what sounds good. We'll keep it fresh with the latest music, but expect a few oldies (but goodies) every once in a while, too. And to close out 2021, we've rounded up some of our favorite bops from the year, just as we did with the 2021 albums you might've missed.

Get ready: The final Bop Shop of 2021 is now open for business.

  • Dawn Richard: "Bussifame"
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uxfjLdQAA4I

    When Dawn Richard returned this year with "Bussifame," the multi-talented artist used it to showcase the future. Across her latest album, Second Line, hallmarks from hew New Orleans upbringing (like the album's title itself) combine with spaced-out R&B, funk, and glimmering grooves. The action comes together beautifully on "Bussifame," a shapeshifting celebration that obliterates genre entirely. Earlier this year, Richard told MTV News of her hope that Second Line would "open a floodgate so that when you ask the next artists under me who were their inspirations, they can name more than one token Black artist as an inspiration to them in a genre that isn't hip-hop or R&B." —Patrick Hosken

  • Wet Leg: "Chaise Longue"
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zd9jeJk2UHQ

    At this point, "Chaise Longue" is essentially a meme. It's easy to see why: a song so effortlessly catchy with bright hooks and deadpan Mean Girls lyrical references that it's tailor-made for the repeat button. Thank the highly playful and canny British duo of Rhian Teasdale and Hester Chambers, who release music as Wet Leg. So far, they've released four songs ahead of their self-titled 2022 debut LP. The best of them is, of course, the delightful sprinkle of indie-rock sugar that is "Chaise Longue." After listening to it so many times, there's only one question left to ask: Would you like us to assign someone to butter your muffin? —Patrick Hosken

  • IU: “Lilac”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v7bnOxV4jAc

    Either you spent the entirety of 2021 streaming “Lilac,” or you’re very, very lame. As the title track from IU’s critically acclaimed fifth album, “Lilac” served as a nostalgic and whimsical introduction to the K-pop superstar’s new era, which soundtracked many of our respective years. With its bright and airy synths, heavy rhythm guitar, and disco pop-inspired melody, the refreshing track breathed new life into a grim year. Featuring accompanying lyrics that bid farewell to the past and provide hope for a better future, IU inspires fans to look forward with positivity and optimism — a perfect message to convey this year. In “Lilac,” IU may have asked us to “love [her] only 'til this spring,” but I have a feeling we’ll be loving her for much, much longer than that. —Sarina Bhutani

  • Muni Long: “Hrs and Hrs”
    https://youtu.be/okfR_VIbXEQ

    Singer-songwriter Muni Long’s latest track “Hrs and Hrs” has ruled the internet for the past week and is setting a cozy new standard for cuffing season. Garnering praise from the likes of Doja Cat and Halle Berry and spawning a remix from August Alsina and numerous compilation videos from fans touting the couple goals the song’s lyrics hint at, the song has everyone online in the mood for love. “Yours, mine, ours / I could do this for hours / Sit and talk to you for hours,” she croons. “When you do what you do I’m empowered / You give me a super power / Together the world could be ours.” Given Long’s writing credits for Rihanna, Mariah Carey, and Fifth Harmony, it’s no wonder the song is a smash. If this is a glimpse of what’s in store from her in the new year, 2022 is already looking promising. —Virginia Lowman

  • Coheed and Cambria: “Shoulders”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Tb_v8MFbF8

    It’s been nearly 20 years since their debut album, The Second Stage Turbine Blade, but Coheed and Cambria are still finding ways to excite their ever-growing fanbase, as we saw with this year’s release of “Shoulders.” The track, a continuation of the longest-running concept story in music, masterfully pairs heavy metal-infused riffs with sweeping, melodic vocals in a way that only Coheed can. For the music video, the progressive rockers deliver a powerful performance as mysterious, masked figures emerge and remove their masks one-by-one to reveal the people underneath. “As a band, we’ve always been a little outside of the mainstream and that’s helped keep us true to ourselves,” the group said in a statement. “As people, it’s important to focus on your strengths and who you are, and not try too hard for acceptance. Everyone is special and has their own unique contributions and that’s what the video represents.” —Farah Zermane

  • Michelle: "Syncopate"
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zE8cTEgAe-E

    "Syncopate," by six-piece New York songwriting collective Michelle, sounds immediate and timeless. As the group gear up to drop their majorly leveled-up second album, After Dinner We Talk Dreams, in January, they're spreading the message far and wide. And "Syncopate," with its gentle swagger and undeniable dance-pop sensibility, is the message. Unlike their soul-baring slow burner "Mess U Made," the two-minute "Syncopate" doesn't have a millisecond to spare, cramming in hooks and harmonies from its four vocalists (Emma, Sofia, Layla, and Jamee) and producers (Charlie and Julian). It's mildly nostalgic and completely suited for a bedroom dance party — both make it utterly 2021. —Patrick Hosken

  • Maisie Peters: “I’m Trying (Not Friends)”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=66KvE4Hk3g8

    This deceptively chipper cut from English indie-pop singer Maisie Peters packs the sort of oh-so-relatable punch only a solid breakup bop can. Try as she might, Peters can’t bring herself to swallow her pride when she encounters her ex-boyfriend in public. “Not friends / No, we’re somewhere in between / ‘Cause you’re awful and I miss you / And I killed you in my dream last night,” she sings over a clapped-out beat and dainty guitar flourishes. Between Peters’s lilting vocals and airtight songwriting, it’s damn near impossible to resist hitting repeat. And hey, if “at least I’m trying” isn’t a perfect summary of 2021, then I don’t know what is. —Sam Manzella

  • Claud: “Soft Spot”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hjqTrZUL_2U

    Claud unleashed the “gay shit” on their first full-length album, Super Monster, back in February, but this especially soft cut has stayed close to mind during the cold winter months. An exceptionally earnest declaration of feelings for a lover long gone, the song and its strumming and slow-thumping chorus is bedroom pop at its finest. “I wish I left all my things at your place / So I could come get them,” they sing, imagining a dream scenario where “we’d do things we might regret,” before resolving that perhaps it’s a hatchet better left unearthed. Still, its dreamy chorus reminds us that a soft spot in the heart stays soft. —Carson Mlnarik

  • CKay: “Love Nwantiti”
    https://youtu.be/MxjrsDV8Aeo

    You can’t scroll through TikTok or Instagram without coming across Nigerian artist CKay’s tropical hit “Love Nwantiti.” With 100 million weekly streams, the Afrobeats song is the earworm we’re all playing and dancing to on a loop. And while the love tale CKay sings of — the kind of love that makes your “temperature rise,” that familiar feeling of someone being “like the oxygen I need to survive” — isn’t new, the introduction of an African dialect into mainstream American pop culture is, and it’s a welcome one. “Love Nwantiti” is Igbo and loosely translates to “small love.” Throughout the song, CKay weaves in other Igbo words and Nigerian cultural staples like “Nkwobi,” which he gets cheeky with lyrically. Hip-hop, pop, and reggaeton all draw inspiration from Afrobeats; music continues to be our gateway to exploring and strengthening our own sense of “love nwantiti” for new cultures. —Virginia Lowman

  • Tkay Maidza: “Cashmere”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QSOdz-J0EMw

    Australian singer-songwriter Tkay Maidza confronts her deepest thoughts alongside smooth hip-hop and soulful synth stylings on her EP Last Year Was Weird, Vol. 3, but no track better describes her dualities than “Cashmere.” A heavenly chorus precedes a bopping beat, highlighting the Zimbabwe-born singer’s velvety voice as she admits she’s both soft and tough — like cashmere — in the midst of a spiraling relationship. And what its dreamy and colorful video lacks in sweaters, it makes up for in bold artistic vision and wildfire spirit. —Carson Mlnarik

  • Vincint: “All Over Again”
    https://youtu.be/LdmU0_oOgl8

    If there was one album that I played on repeat and danced to with reckless abandon, it was Vincint’s There Will Be Tears. A master of heartbreak pop, Vincint has an uncanny ability to layer vulnerable lyrics over an uptempo beat and yield a song that is both a mirror and a cheerleader in your most emotional hours. Though I didn’t experience a breakup this year, spending a year indoors in 2020 definitely put a lot about life and love into perspective, and as this year comes to a close and another few months of quarantine are likely on the horizon, who isn’t questioning what they hope to “do over again” and do better this time around? —Virginia Lowman

  • Flock of Dimes: "Price of Blue"
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KWRjozAXqaw

    One of the best lead-guitar lines of 2021 is thankfully attached to one of the year's best songs, period. Both the ascending ax work and the tune construction come from Jenn Wasner, half of indie stalwart group Wye Oak and Bon Iver member who records solo as Flock of Dimes. Her wraithlike vocals make "Price of Blue" instantly memorable, but her work with producer/Sylvan Esso talent Nick Sanborn to create layers and build upon a skeleton of scuzzy guitar noise transforms it. Thanks to a deceptive chord progression, the song keeps climbing higher like a freed balloon until it's fully out of view. Six and a half minutes feel like a blink. When you open your eyes again, Wasner has quieted — but "Price of Blue," and the rest of her great album Head of Roses, will linger well into 2022. —Patrick Hosken

  • Drinking Boys and Girls Choir: “There Is No Spring”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-q_xru3TiSQ

    When Korean skate-punk band Drinking Boys and Girls Choir returned this year with Marriage License, they simply had no time to waste. The excellent and urgent LP crams 11 songs into 22 minutes, exploding out of the gate while still managing a few wistful and even borderline progressive moments. The best song on it, "There Is No Spring," combines all those elements in a sneak-attack single that shows how much they've matured since 2019's equally kick-ass Keep Drinking. The promise of their future is potent enough to get drunk on. —Patrick Hosken

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Il Divo’s Carlos Marín has died, aged 53

Il Divo singer Carlos Marín has died at the age of 53, his bandmates confirmed today (December 19) in a statement.

The star was rushed to hospital this week and was reportedly in intensive care, although the reason for his admission and his cause of death have yet to be officially confirmed.

“It is with heavy hearts that we are letting you know that our friend and partner, Carlos Marín, has passed away,” the group wrote on Twitter this evening. “He will be missed by his friends, family and fans. There will never be another voice or spirit like Carlos.

“For 17 years the four of us have been on this incredible journey of Il Divo together, and we will miss our dear friend. We hope and pray that his beautiful soul will rest in peace. With Love — David, Sebastien and Urs.”

Il Divo formed in 2003 after being put together by Simon Cowell and combined opera with pop music. The four-piece group went on to sell over 30million copies of their records worldwide and went gold and platinum 160 times in 35 countries.

Marín was born in Germany in 1968, but was raised in Spain. He recorded his first album when he was just eight years old and spent his adolescence successfully competing in music competition TV shows like Gente Joven and Nueva Gente, as well as performing with orchestras on live TV.

Before joining Il Divo, the singer held roles in musicals like Les Misérables, Grease, Peter Pan and more, and sang on the soundtracks of films such as The Nightmare Before Christmas and the Spanish version of Cinderella.

In 2011, Marín held his own solo show in Madrid, continuing to hold his own concerts in Mexico, Spain, the US, South America and Japan in the following years. He released eight studio albums with Il Divo and two solo studio records in his career.

Tributes have begun to be paid to Marín, with singer Michael D. Xavier writing: “So so sad to hear @ildivoofficial singer Carlos Marín has passed away. My heart goes out to his friends and family. His beautiful voice will live on in their fantastic albums.”

Strictly judge and choreographer Bruno Tonioli, who worked with Il Divo, tweeted: “Devastated  @ildivoofficial @carlosmarin_ passed away. We had the best time putting together the first @ildivoofficial performance 17 yeas ago great voice great man a true passionate Spirit with wicked sense of humor we will miss you so sad.”

See more tributes below.

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Zakk Wylde: “If Ozzy Osbourne wasn’t a rockstar, he’d be a stand-up comedian”

Zakk Wylde has opened up about his friendship and working relationship with Ozzy Osbourne.

  • READ MORE: Ozzy Osbourne: “This album saved my life”

The Black Label Society frontman was making an appearance on AXS TV‘s ‘At Home And Social With…’, where he was interviewed about his band’s new album ‘Doom Crew Inc.’ and his history with Osbourne.

Speaking of recording 1988’s ‘No Rest For The Wicked’ and 1991’s ‘No More Tears’, Wylde said: “With Ozz, it’s a miracle any work ever gets done just because we’re constantly… All’s you gotta do is hang out with him for, like, five minutes, you’ll be on the floor crying. ‘Cause he’s always taking the piss out of himself or whatever else is going on in the world. He’s the best. If he wasn’t this legendary frontman and singer and everything like that, he’d have to do stand-up [comedy]. He’s the best. He’s hilarious.”

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When asked if Osbourne had listened to ‘Doom Crew Inc.’ yet, Wylde said: “He tried. He goes, ‘Zakk, I really enjoy the new album.’ I was, like, ‘Ozz, what song do you like the best?’ He goes, ‘I like the part before you put it on and when it ends, and I also like the parts in between the songs when it’s just silence.’ I go, ‘Thanks, Ozz.’ And he goes, ‘Carry on. Good luck with the record.’ I’d expect nothing less.”

Wylde was a part of Osbourne’s band from 1987 to 1995, then again in 1998, from 2001 to 2004 and also from 2006 to 2009. He joined the band for a select number of dates during Osbourne’s 2017 summer tour, and then performed as part of the ‘No More Tours 2’ tour.

The Black Sabbath frontman announced details of his ‘last ever’ tour in September 2018, which was due to take place in 2019. However, he was forced to postpone dates in the UK, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and Japan in February after he was hospitalised with pneumonia. He then postponed all shows due to a subsequent fall.

Last month, the ‘No More Tours 2’ shows were once again rescheduled due to COVID restrictions. Osbourne was due to begin the tour in January 2022 with Judas Priest providing support, but continued COVID restrictions in Europe have now pushed back the dates again.

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The shows will begin in Helsinki on May 3 2023, with European dates running throughout the rest of the month. The UK leg will then begin in Nottingham on May 31 before the tour finishes with a hometown show in Birmingham on June 14.

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The Beatles: Get Back

Peter Jackson is a transformative film director. He’s turned New Zealand into Tolkien’s Middle Earth, and (in his exceptional documentary They Shall Not Grow Old), remade the jerky, unrelatable figures in murky newsreel footage into the very real human combatants in the First World War.

  • ORDER NOW: BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN AND THE REVIEW OF 2021 FEATURE IN THE LATEST ISSUE OF UNCUT

If we were to have believed the teaser trailer for his Beatles documentary, which arrived to cheer the world in high pandemic times, his latest project had done something similar: turned notoriously fraught Beatles sessions into a feelgood movie, their rapport undimmed, the band still essentially – save the long moustaches and the new girlfriends – the same loveable moptops they were in 1964.

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The director is very good, but he’s not a miracle-worker, and that early bit of misdirection ultimately cues up a three-part series which is a great deal deeper than anyone might have hoped. Just as the technical mastery of his war films restoration allowed a greater empathy with the subject, here the restoration brings us closer to the band – John Lennon’s fresh, newly-shaven face; George Harrison’s exceptional clothes – but ultimately shows us a pin-sharp picture of a project which still eludes definition.

Rehearsals for a TV special? Recording new songs for an album? Maybe some combination of the above? While the project grew and changed to find itself, Michael Lindsay-Hogg’s cameras rolled throughout January 1969 following the band from Twickenham to the Apple Studios on Savile Row, to the rooftop and down again. His film, Let It Be (released after the band’s split), succinctly captured some of the not-great atmosphere in the Beatles at that time. These new films – edited from his 150 hours of audio and 60 hours of film – are pitched as a long-overdue corrective to that impression.

Jackson can’t keep the Beatles together, but he does provide revelation. The famous George/Paul exchange at Twickenham (“Whatever you want me to play, I’ll play it…”) is shown here at full length, and proves to be the emotional and conceptual heart of the film; part of a much wider debate about how to move the Beatles forwards as a group, while asserting the personalities of the individuals. Lennon is glassy-eyed and recessive. George, self-evidently feels undervalued. Ringo is generally smoking, or asleep.

  • ORDER NOW: “WE ONLY THINK WE KNOW THE BEATLES”: CLICK HERE TO READ UNCUT’S INTERVIEW WITH PETER JACKSON

Paul, meanwhile, is simply on fire. He’s dynamic and resourceful at solving musical problems. He’s arbiter and vibes controller, and full of ideas for the bigger picture. Incredible music is literally coursing through him – in one among the film’s many unbelievable moments, we watch the arrival of “Get Back”, in real time. On the same day, he has a fun idea for the concert (that they “trespass” somewhere), and with Michael Lindsay-Hogg, comes within a footstep of conceptualising Live Aid. Without him, clearly nothing at all would get done around here. During the film’s most excruciating sequence McCartney tells the unproductive, opiated, Lennon: “To wander aimlessly is very unswinging. It’s unhip. What you need is a schedule.”

Pulling back from the 1969 headlines like this has allowed Jackson to reveal that it’s not Lennon or even McCartney at the heart of this story, but George Harrison. In the flashcard summary of Beatlemania which begins the series, he’s portrayed as a sly wit who also has his head screwed on (“It can’t go on” is his prescient 1964 summary of the band’s future). Come 1969, he’s hungry for change, sick of being condescended to (Lennon: “Is this a Harrisong?”), and on the brink of a singer-songwriterly paradigm shift which the others have failed to yet properly embrace: a sincere, and very 1970s, creative life outside the band.

Meanwhile, The Beatles work. There is jamming, and japes as the band attempt to reconnect with each other from remote camps in their private lives, but each day they interrogate the songs and try to push forward, while Mal Evans (road manager and secret amanuensis) writes down the words. When organist Billy Preston, a former Hamburg buddy, arrives on January 22 to visit, and stays to work, he helps them recapture a love of playing which is utterly innocent and joyful, even while their lives outside the studio remain horribly complex.

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Even amid all this fantastic music, Paul has concerns. Just as it seems like the songs are coming together, the rooftop concert (the spectacular, multi-camera big finish to the film) decided on, and their mad plan to write and rehearse an album in a month near completion,  he bemoans that the ethos has been diluted – they are just making “another fucking album”. He wants the project to climax in a rather more spectacular fashion. What that climax might be precisely is never quite decided on, and nor is one artificially imposed here. Instead, Get Back tells a more subtle story: how the last year of The Beatles was productive for the band, but was also about the birth of four individuals – each with mixed feelings about the idea, each hoping that they might pass the audition.

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Sam Fender to host BBC documentary on late Lindisfarne frontman Alan Hull

Sam Fender will front a BBC Four documentary about Lindisfarne’s late frontman Alan Hull later this week.

  • READ MORE: The NME Big Read – Sam Fender: “This album is probably the best thing I’ve done in my life”

The film Lindisfarne’s Geordie Genius: The Alan Hull Story will see Fender tracing the ’70s band’s history – who were famous for hits such as ‘Lady Eleanor’ and ‘Fog On The Tyne’ – through Hull.

The documentary will also feature a number of celebrity talking heads including Sting, Elvis Costello, Mark Knopfler, Eurythmics‘ Dave Stewart and Peter Gabriel. You can view a trailer below.

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“I was lucky enough to make music and travel the world with Alan for over 25 years and despite the commercial success of Lindisfarne, Alan never received the recognition he deserved as a ‘world-class’ songwriter. I hope our film puts Alan’s songwriting genius beyond doubt,” said Ray Laidlaw, drummer and founding member of Lindisfarne.

Rod Clements, guitarist and founding member of Lindisfarne, added: “Alan’s recognition nationally as a unique and overlooked talent is long overdue. This documentary will rectify that, with affectingly humble and enthusiastic enquiring from Sam Fender, and ringing endorsements from Alan’s better-known contemporaries.

“I’m proud to have been part of this tribute to an underrated artist and friend.”

Meanwhile, Fender last night (November 21) teamed up with Gang Of Youths frontman Dave Le’aupepe in London for a cover of Bruce Springsteen‘s ‘I’m On Fire’.

The pair performed the 1985 hit single during Fender’s encore at Alexandra Palace, after Gang Of Youths supported the singer earlier in the night.

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Fender also recently revealed that he turned down the opportunity to collaborate with Elton John on ‘The Lockdown Sessions’.

The pair previously teamed up for a joint performance of Fender’s ‘Will We Talk?’, with John later hailing him as “the best rock and roll artist there is”.

Lindisfarne’s Geordie Genius: The Alan Hull Story will air on BBC Four this Friday (November 26) at 9pm.

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Omar Souleyman detained and held on terrorism charges in Turkey

Omar Souleyman has been detained in Turkey and is being held on terrorism charges, according to the Syrian musician’s manager.

According to a report from Agence France-Presse, Souleyman’s manager confirmed that the singer was detained due to alleged associations he has with the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK).

The PKK is considered a terrorist organisation by Turkey, the European Union and the United States, and has carried out attacks on Turkish soil in recent years. The musician’s manager added that he was being questioned over allegedly recently travelling back to Syria to an area controlled by PKK-affiliated group, the YPG.

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The Syrian-born Souleyman fled with his family to southeastern Turkey over a decade ago, setting up a free bakery in a border town to feed the hungry on both sides of the border.

Credit: Press / Robin Aron

Souleyman’s most recent album, titled ‘Shlon’, came out in 2019. Reviewing the album, NME wrote: “‘Shlon’ allows Souleyman to lift the curtain into his culture, showing his artistry and why exactly he’s one of the most sought-after producers in the world. To pigeonhole him as a wedding singer is reductive.

“His ear for contrasting sounds, and his ability to bring joy, allows us to escape into his work. He shines a light on happiness – something we desperately need in today’s world.”

Back in 2015, Souleyman pledged to raise funds for refugees seeking to find a new home in Europe at all his future live shows. “All future Omar Souleyman shows dedicate to help Syrian people fleeing to a better life elsewhere,” a statement read.

Souleyman has collaborated with the likes of Damon Albarn, Björk, Four Tet, The Black Lips, Gilles Peterson and Modeselektor in the past.

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Tributes paid to UB40 toaster Astro who has died

UB40 singer, trumpeter, percussionist and toaster Astro has died, following “a very short illness”, it has been confirmed.

Astro – whose real name was Terence Wilson – died today (November 6). He was 64 years old.

A tweet on the Ali Campbell and Astro Twitter account shared the sad news with fans, saying they were “absolutely devastated and completely heartbroken” by his death. “The world will never be the same without him,” they added. “We ask you to please respect his family’s privacy at this incredibly difficult time.”

A message was also posted on the official UB40 Twitter account. “RIP ASTRO,” it read. “We have heard tonight, the sad news that ex-member of UB40, Terence Wilson, better know as Astro, has passed away after a short illness. Our sincere condolences to his family.”

The musician was a founding member of the Birmingham reggae and pop group in 1979, remaining in the line-up until 2013. He later formed a new version of the band with Campbell and Mickey Virtue.

With the original version of UB40, Astro released 18 studio albums, including the 1983 chart-topper ‘Labour Of Love’, which spawned the Number One single ‘Red Red Wine’, and 1985’s ‘Baggariddim’, which boasted the Chrissie Hynde collaboration ‘I Got You Babe’. His last record with the band was 2013’s ‘Getting Over The Storm’.

In a statement announcing his decision to leave the band, Astro said the group was like a “rudderless ship” and cited a “serious lack of communication between the band and management”, as well as the musical direction the band had gone in on ‘Getting Over The Storm’.

Tributes have begun to be paid online following the news of Astro’s death, with fans calling the Birmingham musician a “Brum legend”.

“Sad to read of Astro’s passing,” one Twitter user said. “I grew up listening to UB40, Signing Off is such a brilliant album today. Saw him a few times down the Blues, always with a smile and always got a great reception.”

Another added: “UB40 were the bedrock of my youth. They’ve been integral to my adult years. Anyone who knows me will have unfortunately suffered either my poor karaoke or 3am control of the remote. Astro is a hero. Gutted. RIP.”

See more tributes below.

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The Anchoress announces UK spring tour for 2022

The Anchoress has announced a UK tour set to take place in spring 2022 – see the full list of tour dates below.

  • READ MORE: The Anchoress shares ‘The Art Of Losing’ video and tells us about her Manics-featuring new album

Back in August, the singer (real name Catherine Anne Davies) cancelled the remaining dates of her 2021 tour following medical advice from her doctor.

She has now rescheduled those dates and has announced a number others, with her spring tour kicking off on March 11 at Guildford’s Boileroom and ending at Manchester’s Deaf Institute on May 25. Davies will also play Long Division Festival in Wakefield on June 11.

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You can get tickets for The Anchoress’ upcoming tour here and see the full list of dates below:

MARCH 2022
11 – Guildford, Boileroom
12 – Gloucester, Guildhall
13 – Hebden Bridge, Trades Club
14 – Hull, Central Library

APRIL 2022
28 – Cambridge, Storey Fields

MAY 2022
1 – London, Queen Elizabeth Hall
2 – Brighton, Komedia
3 – Bristol, Thekla
5 – Nottingham, Rescue Rooms
6 – Birmingham, O2 Institute
25 – Manchester, Deaf Institute

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JUNE 2022
11 – Wakefield, Long Division Festival

Last week, The Anchoress was among the named acts who have been shortlisted for this year’s Welsh Music Prize.

Returning for its 11th year, the annual award recognises the best in creativity from the Welsh music scene as well as music made by Welsh people around the world.

The 12 albums shortlisted for the 2021 prize have now been announced. They include: The Anchoress’ ‘The Art Of Losing’; Gruff Rhys’ ‘Seeking New Gods’; Mace The Great’s ‘My Side Of The Bridge’, and Kelly Lee Owens‘ ‘Inner Song’. You can see the full list here.

In a four-star review of the ‘The Art Of Losing’, NME‘s El Hunt wrote: “In all of this, there is no astounding moment of revelation or lesson learned – instead The Anchoress says something important about how we frequently turn to art as a kind of mirror in our most devastating moments.

“And as a record ‘The Art of Losing’ also holds up a reflection which is both painful and familiar – it captures the unpredictable, spinning chaos of grief with a searing precision that’s hard to turn away from.”

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The Beau Brummels Turn Around: The Complete Recordings

A sign of how quickly the folk, country and “baroque and roll” of The Beau Brummels entered mainstream consciousness came with their appearance in a 1965 episode of The Flintstones. Billed, almost inevitably, as The Beau Brummelstones and sporting plum-coloured, turtleneck prehistoric garb, the San Francisco five-piece had been together less than 18 months when their animated versions took to the stage of the Bedrock A-Go-Go nightclub to perform Laugh, Laugh.

  • ORDER NOW: David Bowie is on the cover of the December 2021 issue of Uncut

That debut hit (co-produced by a 21-year-old Sylvester Stewart, before he rebranded himself as Sly Stone) was at the vanguard of the Bay Area’s reaction to the British Invasion, and swathes of the Anglophiles’ early recordings were informed especially by the acoustic strum of Beatles For Sale. However, the harmonies of lead singer Sal Valentino and guitarists Ron Elliott and Declan Mulligan were, initially, rooted in the pop-folk of closer-to-home outfits like The Kingston Trio.

Introducing The Beau Brummels sets out their stall, hook-packed Elliott originals (the bubblegum-tastic Stick Like Glue) supplemented by feather-light covers of country star Don Gibson’s Oh Lonesome Me and bluesman Jimmy Reed’s Ain’t That Loving You Baby. Volume 2 is even more harmony-laden and arguably the band’s strongest set of songs, with Byrds motifs aplenty on the jangle overload Don’t Talk To Strangers.

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The band themselves were unhappy with Beau Brummels ’66, a quickie covers project at the behest of their new label, Warner Brothers, rush-released to capitalise on previous success, but underwhelming when held up against the disc contained here of demos recorded for their former paymasters, Autumn. There’s little joy in the workmanlike and wearisomely obvious retreads of Monday Monday or Mr Tambourine Man and a brace of Beatles tunes, but the chamber-pop overhaul of the Stones’ Play With Fire is eerily affecting, and McCartney’s lesser known Woman (a medium-sized hit for Peter & Gordon earlier in the year) is a bouncy 12-bar shuffle.

A slimmed-down lineup of Valentino, Elliott and bassist Ron Meagher foresook the live stage to focus on 1967’s Triangle, its multi-layered, studio-bound psychedelia realised with the help of primo sessioneers including Van Dyke Parks, James Burton and Carol Kaye. A concept album of sorts, its fantasy subject matter is heavily influenced by JRR Tolkien (The Wolf Of Velvet Fortune, first single Magic Hollow), but covers of Merle Travis’s Nine Pound Hammer and Randy Newman’s Old Kentucky Home signalled a soon-come full-on pivot towards country, as do demos of the previously unreleased elegant strummers Happiness Is Funny and Elevators.

Recorded at, and taking its title from, the famed Tennessee studio of Patsy Cline and Loretta Lynn producer Owen Bradley, Bradley’s Barn (’68) sees Warners attempt to pitch the Brummels to the same burgeoning country-rock audience as labelmates The Everly Brothers(who would cover Turn Around for their own Roots album the same year). Honky-tonk hues are to the fore, not least on stripped-back outtakes of Johnny Cash’s Long Black Veil and Dylan’s I’ll Be Your Baby Tonight, but it’s at its most robust on Love Can Fall A Long Way Down, reconnecting with the shimmering harmony
pop that first brought the band to the attention of record buyers.

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Uncut December 2021

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David Bowie, Pink Floyd, REM, The Waterboys, Led Zeppelin, Modern Nature, Michael Chapman, Gil Scott-Heron, Dion, Dean Wareham and The Beatles all feature in the new Uncut, dated December 2021 and in UK shops from October 14 or available to buy online now. As always, the issue comes with a free CD, this time comprising 15 tracks of the month’s best new music.

DAVID BOWIE: On the cusp of a new century, what does David Bowie do? Having plotted a dramatic course forward across four decades, he decides instead to revisit a number of songs from the earliest days of his career. But the album he records, called Toy, is consigned to Bowie’s vaults, where it has been the subject of much intense speculation ever since. To celebrate its imminent release – 21 years late! – we bring you the definitive account of David Bowie’s legendary lost album as told by Bowie’s closest collaborators and confidants. “It’s a ghost album,” Tony Visconti tells Peter Watts. “I’m so glad people are now getting to hear it, because I think some of David’s finest work is on Toy.”

OUR FREE CD! CONVERSATION PIECES: 15 fantastic new tracks, including songs by Courtney Barnett, Modern Nature, Endless Boogie, Bedouine, Richard Dawson & Circle, Tobacco City, Damon Albarn, New Age Doom & Lee “Scratch” Perry and more.

This issue of Uncut is available to buy by clicking here – with FREE delivery to the UK and reduced delivery charges for the rest of the world.

Inside the issue, you’ll find:

PINK FLOYD: From Roger Waters’ kitchen table in the South of France to the cavernous soundstages of Pinewood Studios, stadia and beyond… With a new book featuring previously unseen artwork due out this month, Gerald Scarfe rebuilds Pink Floyd’s The Wall. “They thought I was ‘fucking mad’,” he tells Nigel Williamson.

THE WATERBOYS: Riding high on the creative momentum of Fisherman’s Blues, in 1989 The Waterboys reconvened at their new spiritual home on the west coast of Ireland to make the follow-up, with a seven-piece live band that had been hitting rare heights of roots rock rapture on tour. Mike Scott’s plan to broaden the sound didn’t quite go to plan, but as a new box-set reveals, Room To Roam was far from the misfire it was initially dismissed as. Graeme Thomson gets the whole story from the artists formerly known as “The Magnificent Seven”.

GIL SCOTT-HERON: Poet, jazz musician, rap pioneer, radical activist… Gil Scott-Heron broke a lot of ground during the early ’70s. As his landmark album Pieces Of A Man turns 50, collaborators and eyewitnesses tell Sam Richards about Scott-Heron’s creative peak, the power of his songs and the importance of what he was saying: “He was serving the entire community, the entire world, by bringing these things to light…”

MODERN NATURE: Zookeeper, garage-rock avatar, avant-garde explorer… Jack Cooper had already travelled long distances before he left the city for the right kind of quiet. But while this move has given Cooper fresh perspective, what does it mean for his band, Modern Nature? Tom Pinnock joins Cooper in a field in England: “I’m after openness and expansiveness now.”

MICHAEL CHAPMAN: With Michael Chapman’s passing, we have lost a true original: an indefatigable singer-songwriter who bridged the gap between the visionary guitarists of the ’60s and their 21st century counterparts. In this interview from 2016 – much of it previously unpublished – Chapman talks Tom Pinnock through the many highlights of his remarkable and enduring career: “All there is, is freedom.”

DION: The irrepressible rock’n’roller shares his stories of a life well lived, from riding rhinos in Bronx Zoo to watching Dylan go electric – and even getting on the good side of Lou Reed. “I’m tellin’ ya!”

REM: The making of “Electrolite”.

LARAAJI: Album by album with the American multi-instrumentalist.

DEAN WAREHAM: First solo album from the man who gave us Galaxie 500 and Luna.

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In our expansive reviews section, we take a look at new records from Damon Albarn, Bedouine, Margo Cilker, Endless Boogie, Curtis Harding, Richard Dawson & Circle, and more, and archival releases from The Beatles, Radiohead, John Coltrane, Echo & the Bunnymen, Leo Nocentelli and others. We catch Genesis and New Order live; among the films, DVDs and TV programmes reviewed are Dune, Last Night In Soho, The French Dispatch and Look Away; while in books there’s Bobby Gillespie, Paul Morley and Shane MacGowan.

Our front section, meanwhile, features Led Zeppelin, The Wedding Present, Charles Lloyd, Dead Moon and Billy Nomates, while, at the end of the magazine, Nubya Garcia reveals the records that have soundtracked her life.

You can pick up a copy of Uncut in the usual places, where open. But otherwise, readers all over the world can order a copy from here.

CLICK TO GET THE NEW UNCUT DELIVERED TO YOUR DOOR

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Sam Fender celebrates Newcastle’s takeover at St. James’ Park: “I’m really, really hungover”

Sam Fender enjoyed a celebratory night out in his hometown of Newcastle last night (October 7) after controversial owner Mike Ashley finally departed Newcastle United.

Pictures of Fender celebrating with fans outside St James’ Park, Newcastle’s ground, have appeared on social media overnight, while earlier this morning (October 8) Fender appeared on BBC Breakfast where he recounted the night’s celebrations.

  • READ MORE: Sam Fender: “This album is probably the best thing I’ve done in my life”

“Well, we [Fender and his band] did Jools Holland and then we went straight up to St James’. My saxophone player Johnny got on the statue and started playing ‘Local Hero’ and 5000 Geordies just started singing along,” Fender told the hosts of BBC Breakfast about his night out.

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“I did about a thousand selfies, I got proper mobbed but everyone was absolutely class and they gave us a lot of cans. And I’m really hungover. I’m really, really hungover. But these things happen, don’t they?”

When asked about Newcastle’s takeover and their controversial new owners, Fender quipped: “Woah, I feel like I’m on TalkSport. It’s obviously quite a contentious situation as well. I’m just really happy for the fans and I’m happy for the the city, and I’m happy for what might come of it economically for my place, my town.

“It’s a bittersweet moment, it’s one of them. We’re chuffed, but there is a lot of stuff in question that we probably need some transparency on in the future.”

You can see images and clips of Fender celebrating with Newcastle fans below.

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Yesterday Fender announced his biggest UK headline tour to date for 2022 – check out the full schedule here.

The North Shields singer-songwriter will hit the road next year in support of his second album ‘Seventeen Going Under’, which arrives today (October 8).

In a four star review of Fender’s new album, NME said: “If ‘Hypersonic Missiles’ was the sound of a young boy kicking out at the world, ‘Seventeen Going Under’ sees Fender realise that it can kick back a lot harder, and he counts every blow and bruise.

“But he seems to have found that time passes and that most wounds – even the deepest – will eventually heal, if he can allow them to.”

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Tributes paid to Delays’ Greg Gilbert, who has died following cancer battle

Greg Gilbert, singer and guitarist for Southampton band Delays, has died.

His death was confirmed by bandmate and brother Aaron Gilbert, who took to Twitter this evening (September 30) to share the tragic news.

“I have no idea how to do this right now, but this afternoon at 2:22; we walked my brother back home to somewhere out there in the ether,” Aaron wrote.

“Greg died surrounded in the endless love that us and all of you have given him on this journey, and we Weill never be able to fully express how much it meant to him (and all of us) to have you by our side lifting us up like a winged army.

He added: “Your messages, your encouragement and your compassion have been our oxygen for the last 5 years.” See Aaron’s full statement below.

The singer and guitarist was diagnosed with stage four bowel cancer in 2016, with the cancer also found to have spread to his lungs at that time.

Sharing an update on his health via Twitter last month, Gilbert said he had been taken off treatment and was being treated for pain relief at Countess Mountbatten Hospice.

“The pains are mostly under control and the nurses here are nothing less than angels,” he wrote. “But I’m now in an uncertain future where I don’t know how long I have and what the days will look like.”

Fans have taken to social media to pay tribute to Greg, sharing messages, memories and their condolences.

“One of the most profound artists whose work I’ve known has died. I implore you to seek out Greg Gilbert’s art, read his poetry, and listen to his brilliant music as a member of Delays,” one fan wrote on Twitter.

Another said: “Awful news about Greg Gilbert. The myriad burst of melody and sunshine his music gave is indicative of his gift. Love and respect to @AaronDelays and @Delays_ sincere appreciation for every burst of music. Your tunes find multiple places in some of my best memories.”

One Twitter user recalled meeting their now husband at a Delays gig, writing: “Absolutely gutted about Greg Gilbert. Delays were such a big part of my life for several years and I’ll always remember my now-husband tapping me on the shoulder to say hello in person for the first time after one of their gigs at Leeds Cockpit in 2006. RIP Greg.”

You can see more tributes to Greg below:

You can donate to Countess Mountbatten Hospice, which provides care for people with “life-limiting” illnesses and their families in Southampton and west Hampshire, here.

In 2019, Gilbert’s poems about living with cancer were published as part of the Laureate’s Choice series. The musician’s work was selected by Poet Laureate Carol Ann Duffy for publication.

Delays formed in Southampton in 2001 and were signed to Rough Trade between 2003 and 2006. They have released four albums, including their debut ‘Faded Seaside Glamour’, which entered the Top 20 in the Official UK Albums Chart.

This is a developing story…

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Rory Gallagher Rory Gallagher 50th Anniversary Edition

When Taste broke up in the autumn of 1970, Rory Gallagher went through the mixed emotions that follow any divorce. There was pride: their final festival appearance at the alongside and had been spectacular and their last studio album, 1970’s On The Boards, had fused Gallagher’s driving blues-rock with jazzier, more experimental influences and taken the band into the UK albums chart for the first time.

  • ORDER NOW: The Rolling Stones are on the cover of the November 2021 issue of Uncut

Yet there was frustration and anger, too. There was enmity with Taste’s manager Eddie Kennedy, who had signed a recording deal with Polydor that gave him ownership of the band, with Gallagher and the other two members of Taste individually under contract to him as employees.

There were also tensions within the trio, as drummer John Wilson and bassist Richard McCracken increasingly came to resent Gallagher taking the limelight as guitarist, singer and songwriter. After Taste had played their final gig, Wilson savaged Gallagher in the music press, claiming the band had broken up owing to the guitarist’s greed and arrogance.

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Neither were traits that anybody who knew Gallagher remotely recognised and it was typical of his generosity and modesty that he refused to respond. He preferred to look forward rather than back and Taste had turned so sour that he refused to play the band’s material in his live sets for the rest of his life.

Keeping his eyes on the horizon meant going solo and a new deal with Polydor, negotiated with the assistance of Led Zep manager Peter Grant, who stormed into the office of Polydor’s MD, ripped up the offered contract and told him, “Give Rory a decent fucking deal.” The outcome was a six-album deal on substantially more generous terms.

Gallagher wanted a fresh approach but was still wedded to the idea of a power trio, and a new rhythm section was required to back him. According to one story, Robert Stigwood tried to persuade him to play with Jack Bruce and Ginger Baker in a putative Cream Mark II. Gallagher rejected the idea of being shoehorned into Eric Clapton’s fringed boots, but he did try working with Noel Redding and Mitch Mitchell, both of whom were at a post-Hendrix loose end. In the event he found what he was seeking closer to home in drummer Wilgar Campbell and bassist Gerry McAvoy from Deep Joy, an Irish band that had supported Taste at the Marquee.

By the time Gallagher’s eponymous solo debut finally appeared in May 1971, it was almost 18 months since Taste’s final studio album and the songs were tumbling out of him. It’s not hard to see references to the break-up of Taste in the lyrics of songs such as I Fall Apart and For The Last Time. But it’s the breadth and nuance of the material that is most striking. Laundromat boasts a classic Gallagher blues-rock riff, as does Sinner Boy with its stinging slide guitar. But thereafter things get gentler and more introspective, in the manner of the more acoustic-tinged material on Led Zeppelin III.

Heavily influenced by his admiration for Davy Graham, Bert Jansch and John Renbourn, Just The Smile would not have been out of place on a Pentangle album. Can’t Believe It’s True has a West Coast vibe, a Jefferson Airplane jam maybe. On the acoustic down-home blues of Wave Myself Goodbye and I’m Not Surprised – inspired by Gallagher’s discovery of the 1930s recordings of Scrapper Blackwell and Blind Boy Fuller – the rhythm section is banished and replaced by the boogie-woogie piano of Atomic Rooster’s Vincent Crane. It’s You is pure country and oozes with Gallagher’s love of Hank Williams.

This anniversary edition expands the album’s 10 original songs somewhat gratuitously to more than 50 tracks. ’ Gypsy Woman and Otis Rush’s It Takes Time are ferocious excursions into electric Chicago blues. The gentle folk-rocker At The Bottom heard in four almost identical takes and on which Gallagher blows some lovely harmonica, eventually appeared on the 1975 album Against The Grain. For the rest it’s mostly alternate takes of songs on the album, several of them breaking down and few, if any, departing radically from the versions that made the cut.

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The final disc of radio sessions offers further iterations of six of the songs on the 1971 album plus a preview of In Your Town, a stomping slide-guitar showcase that would appear six months later on Gallagher’s second solo set, Deuce.

By coincidence Gallagher and Clapton both released their self-titled solo debuts within a few months of each other – and in terms of blues-rock guitar-slingers seeking to expand their signature sound, Gallagher’s effort at this distance stands up as more coherent, consistent and focused. More than a quarter century on from his death, he’s missed more than ever.

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Van der Graaf Generator The Charisma Years 1970-1978

As Mark E Smith once told Peter Hammill, it wasn’t Van Der Graaf Generator’s lyrics that sparked his love for the band, or the specifics of their music, nor even their academic complexity. It was the sheer power of the thing that drew him in. “He said, ‘You just have to go with the power,’” recalls Hammill today. “And I agree with that. Mark did like an aspect of noise, something Van Der Graaf have always liked. Sometimes that’s just noise brutality, and sometimes it’s noise in the musique concrète style.”

  • ORDER NOW: The Rolling Stones are on the cover of the November 2021 issue of Uncut

Even Van Der Graaf Generator’s detractors would be hard-pressed to deny their intensity. Here was a four-piece with often no electric guitar or bassist, just drums, organ (plus bass pedals), saxophone and a singer issuing the most infernal noises –choirboy coos, banshee wails and demonic grunts – from his slender frame. “He does seem like a normal person,” organist Hugh Banton said of Hammill in a 2016 issue of Uncut, “but evidently he isn’t…”

Formed as an R&B outfit in Manchester at the height of psychedelia, they soon began to concoct a menacing, very European mix of the avant-garde, curdled folk music, angular rock and operatic drama. The constant was chaos – in the tumult of Guy Evans’ savage drumming, in David Jackson’s electronically processed saxophones and especially in Hammill’s untutored guitar and keyboard playing, an elemental counterpoint to Banton’s scholarly skills on the organ. That Charisma allowed them to make such a mess unhindered was certainly heroic, if not fiscally wise.

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They reformed in 2005 for a fruitful final act, but here, collected for the first time across 18 hours, 122 tracks and a disc of video performances, is Van Der Graaf’s original voyage, a stop-start revolution beginning with hippie-ish sci-fi balladry and concluding with a live album that predicted the weirdest post-punk.

We begin with February 1970’s The Least We Can Do Is Wave To Each Other, opener Darkness (11/11) confidently floating in on spacey organ and wind noise. Very Floyd, and yet the Syd-less group themselves were just finding their feet in early 1970, while Genesis and Yes were still stumbling around. Perhaps the only group who’d already made a classic prog record were King Crimson. It’s apt, then, that one section of the 11-minute After The Flood echoes the manic rush of 21st Century Schizoid Man and that Robert Fripp would guest on December’s H To He, Who Am The Only One, and 1971’s Pawn Hearts.

The latter is one of their masterpieces, three deranged tracks of vaulting ambition and strangeness. Twelve-minute opener Lemmings (Including Cog), especially, is a gloriously ugly delicacy that must have sent less adventurous listeners rushing back to the shop to return their LP. Man-Erg begins as a grand piano ballad, before a thoroughly cacophonous section appears like sludge rising to a lake’s surface. By the end of the song, the two sections are being played simultaneously. Back Street Luv this was not. Pawn Hearts peaks with the side-long A Plague Of Lighthouse Keepers. A modular tale of death, despair and redemption, it’s highly experimental, including one part where 16 Van Der Graafs play different songs at once.

Such inspired madness chimed with the mood across Europe in the days of the Baader-Meinhof group and Brigadi Rossi. The group were frequently met by riots on the Continent, on one occasion driving their van through the glass wall of a venue to escape the mob. All this intensity led to a temporary split, and when Godbluff appeared in 1975, things were very different. Hammill, his hair shorn, was now playing electric guitar or violent clavinet, and the group were recording live, with none of the cut-up complexity of their previous work. Here were four long songs, tortuous and brutal, led as always by Hammill’s crooning and screeching. “From what tooth or claw does murder spring?” he bellows on The Sleepwalkers. “From what flesh and blood does passion?” At times his performances on Godbluff suggest David Bowie under the sway of the demonic forces he’d been drawing pentagrams to banish, though Diamond Dogs’ Sweet Thing/Candidate/Sweet Thing (Reprise) suggests the flow of influence went only one way.

1976’s Still Life was a quieter affair, the title track informing us that death, though awful, is at least preferable to eternal life, “ultimately bored by endless ecstasy”. After the tepid World Record – Meurglys III, a reggae-tinged epic about Hammill’s favourite guitar, is not their finest 21 minutes – Banton and Jackson left the band, no longer able to survive the financial penalty of being so uncompromising. Things could have gone very wrong for Van Der Graaf then, with punk’s dust cloud appearing on the horizon, but the next two years saw a brave move further towards pummelling noise that put them in step with the coming storm. 1977’s The Quiet Zone/The Pleasure Dome seems to invent Muse, while ’78’s Vital, an in-the-red live set with John Lydon in the crowd presumably picking up tips for PiL, is a highlight of the box, a distorted medley of …Lighthouse Keepers and The Sleepwalkers, white-hot.

Sprinkled among these album tracks are radio sessions – including an amusing Top Gear interview in which Hammill reveals that an early member left to join blues-rockers Juicy Lucy, and an electrifying Peel session from the Godbluff era. Other treats include an early studio version of Killer, a first mix of Theme One, and The Boat Of A Million Years, a typically breezy B-side about Ra’s solar barque.

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Live In Rimini 1975 is worthwhile, mainly because it includes the Hammill solo tracks (In The) Black Room… and A Louse Is Not A Home, intended for the scrapped Pawn Hearts follow-up, but the quality is grainier than a ’70s macrobiotic diet. Much better is a crystal-clear 1976 set from Paris’ Maison Mutualite, one of the classic lineup’s last stands. They’re tight, especially on the closing Killer and Man-Erg, but there’s always a sense that they’re teetering on a knife edge – that chaos, again.

Though it’s not new material per se, the jewels in the box are the four new stereo remixes of their core albums, H To He…, Pawn Hearts, Godbluff and Still Life, which enhance the clarity and sense of space in the music. H To He…’s Killer and The Emperor In His War Room are fuller, more vibrant, while A Plague Of Lighthouse Keepers reveals new instrumental layers and improves the crossfades between sections. Godbluff is alternately harder hitting and more intimate: during the hushed intro of The Undercover Man, it’s as if Hammill is right there whispering in your ear, the type of hallucinatory voice that so often afflicts his damaged protagonists.

The Charisma Years isn’t a revelatory box – there are only a few gems here that haven’t already been brought to light elsewhere, notably the Parisian live set. It is, though, a comprehensive survey of a revelatory group. Listened to in the wrong mood, Van Der Graaf Generator can sound ridiculous, the lyrics overdone, the distorted saxes painful, Hammill’s astounding vocals too extreme; but, entered into wholly, this is music with a gnomic power, that can incite riots and assorted psychic disturbances. As Mark E Smith would attest, that power is hard to resist.

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Dear John: John Lennon tribute show set to be livestreamed next month

Details of a new John Lennon tribute event, Dear John, have been announced.

  • ORDER NOW: The Rolling Stones are on the cover of Uncut’s November 2021 issue
  • READ MORE: Hear three tracks from The Beatles’ new Let It Be special editions

The online event will follow on from the release earlier this year of the Dear John tribute album, which featured Lennon covers by a range of artists and raised money for War Child.

A livestream tribute concert will now take place on October 9 to mark what would have been Lennon‘s 81st birthday, with the event benefitting War Child once again.

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Organised by Blurred Vision frontman Sepp Osley with his partner/singer-songwriter Mollie Marriott, Dear John will be hosted by BBC presenter Bob Harris and feature a host of special guests who perform Lennon and Beatles covers, as well as providing “personal messages of peace and love throughout the night”.

Martin Freeman, Peter Frampton, Matt Lucas, Jack Savoretti, Fearne Cotton, Yola, Matt Sorum (Guns N’ Roses, Velvet Revolver), Irvine Welsh (Trainspotting), fashion designer Pam Hogg, Mark Williams (Harry Potter, Red Dwarf), Joe Brown, Sam Brown, Judie Tzuke, Scott Matthews, Chloe Foy, Baby Sol, Luke Friend, Minh, Jo Harman, Elles Bailey, Jasmine Rodgers, Scott McKeon, Gavin Conder, Laura Evans and more will all take part.

Dear John line-up poster. Credit: Press

Speaking about the 2021 Dear John concert, Osley – whose band Blurred Vision will provide backing on the night as the ‘house band’ – said: “Never in my wildest dreams could I have imagined the success that this humble event conjured in 2020 during the height of the pandemic. It all began with a simple concept of celebrating the legacy that John Lennon left behind.

“A legacy of peace and unity and love on a global scale, and now to be able to perform these timeless songs with so many heroes and contemporaries of the music world, while raising money for this incredible charity at such a crucial time, is something I could never have conceived or believed when I began my tumultuous journey on this planet.”

A one-off ticketed event, all donations and net proceeds raised from the show will go directly to the War Child charity. You can find tickets for Dear John here.

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Noel Gallagher recently revealed that he intends to release his cover of John Lennon‘s “Mind Games”, which he recorded to mark the late Beatle‘s 80th birthday last year.

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After Ed Sheeran’s Math-Symbol Albums Comes ‘Five More Records With A Plan’

A decade ago, Ed Sheeran began a quest. He named his first album + ("Plus") and his 2014 follow-up x ("Multiply") as part of a master plan. "'Multiply' was called 'Multiply' because it made everything that was on 'Plus' bigger," he told Entertainment Weekly in 2015. "From the venues to the songs to the radio plays to the sales. I don’t know what the theme on the next album is yet because I haven't made it."

That ended up being 2017's ÷ ("Divide), which, despite its more reductive title, became his biggest yet: It hit No. 1 in the United States and all over Europe, yielded chart-topping singles, and led to the highest-grossing tour of all time. It also made Sheeran a household name — so it makes sense that, after a slight diversion in 2019's No.6 Collaborations Project, he's chosen to not call his next album - ("Subtract"). Instead, the more harmonious = ("Equals") will drop in October.

But as Sheeran told MTV News ahead of the 2021 VMAs, don't count out "Subtract" just yet. "There's one more album after 'Equals,'" he told correspondent Dometi Pongo on the red carpet, standing with his label signee Maisie Peters. "And then the mathematics are done."

https://www.instagram.com/p/CTvoKURrA-2/

While he didn't explicitly confirm that the final one in the sequence would, in fact, be called -, the process of elimination would suggest it. If that's true, that same EW interview might point toward what we could expect an album called "Subtract" to sound like: "My idea for 'Subtract' was to not have anything on it, just be an acoustic record."

"Equals," meanwhile, is due to be very much not an acoustic record. Though the singer-songwriter touches on early single "Visiting Hours" might suggest it, fellow = tracks "Bad Habits" and "Shivers" lean very heavily into dance-pop. When he performed "Shivers" at last night's VMAs, he gripped his acoustic guitar as always, though he did it while backed up with a full band and plenty of pop style.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5VLnE82dio

It seems fair to assume that =, like Sheeran's preceding albums, will be a mixed bag of ballads and more pop-driven bangers. And if his potential future "Subtract" era brings a return to his folky roots, it'll also present some real closure. Once the math symbols are through, Sheeran said to MTV News, "then it's five more records with a plan."

There's something extremely satisfying about seeing Sheeran carry out this plan, which could have very easily become a mere gimmick in the vein of Sufjan Stevens's 50 states project. He's stuck to his guns through massive life changes — marriage, fatherhood — and it's given him some great perspective.

"For the whole of 'Divide,' I didn't look back. I was just forward, forward, forward," he told MTV News. "And then I got to the end of it, and I was like, I wish I'd stopped for a little bit and just been like, ah, this went well." Spoken like a true balanced equation.

Check out all the winner's from the 2021 VMAs right here.

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Christine Perfect Christine Perfect (Reissue, 1970)

Considering Christine McVie’s huge success with Fleetwood Mac, penning songs that would stay in the UK and US charts for months on end, this treasure of a debut album is curiously unknown. In 1970, Christine Perfect – the maiden name by which she was still known, at least professionally – was performing with Chicken Shack, dabbling with her husband’s band Fleetwood Mac, then led by Peter Green, and also finding time to record and release this bluesy delight on, naturally, Blue Horizon.

  • ORDER NOW: The Rolling Stones are on the cover of the November 2021 issue of Uncut

Christine Perfect is full of sultry brilliance. Take Crazy ’Bout You Baby, which manages to be sexy and yet also perhaps the most clipped English delivery on record. There are two strong Bobby Bland covers, of the B-side I’m On My Way, full of longing and sensual desperation, and I’m Too Far Gone (To Turn Around), which lacks the xylophone and cooing backing singers of the R&B original but again, is uniquely and charmingly delivered.

At times, McVie’s vocals are curiously detached from the music, as if she’s in the room with you, singing along to a recording of the backing. It works, though: her version of I’d Rather Go Blind doesn’t have the guts and grit of Etta James’s version from three years earlier, but it shines a whole new light on the song. Chicken Shack – bass guitarist Andy Sylvester, guitarist Stan Webb and drummer Dave Bidwell – back McVie on the latter track, which shows off their skill at sounding like they’re playing down the local pub, while also being telepathically locked in a groove. Elsewhere, Tony Joe White’s I Want You is more Thames than swamp without the lowdown dirty guitar White brought to the song. McVie shows off her keyboard skills throughout the album, though, but also stretches her voice, allowing it to soar, whisper or belt depending on what the songs need.

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Danny Kirwan and John McVie turn up on Kirwan’s When You Say, a tender ballad with syrupy strings. McVie’s delivery, however, is distinctly Nico-ish, bringing an icy defiance to lines such as “When you say/That there’ll always be/You and me”. There are also a handful of original songs, from the minor-key blues of Wait And See and the funkier R&B of Close To Me. Funereal horns lift No Road Is The Right Road, while McVie really lets rip on the mutated 12-bar boogie of For You. These originals don’t have the indelible melodies of the likes of Don’t Stop or Little Lies, but they have a ragged soul that transcends the muddy production.

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First Look Becoming Led Zeppelin

After a sneak preview at the Telluride Film Festival, Becoming Led Zeppelin made it’s premier at this year’s Venice Film Festival. Uncut was there to bring you this first look review…

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The key word in new documentary Becoming Led Zeppelin, just premiered at the Venice Film Festival, is ‘becoming’. The film’s final section shows the last phase of their turning into a world-conquering force – their breakneck first year of existence, and the recording of their first two albums. But what really makes the film fascinating is all that happened before. Directors Bernard MacMahon (who made the roots documentary American Epic) and Allison McGourty have filmed new interviews with Robert Plant, Jimmy Page and John Paul Jones, reminiscing about their apprenticeship years. Page is seen as a shy budding skiffler on a BBC children’s talent show, while Jones remembers learning the tools of the trade from his vaudevillean parents. The late John Bonham is also heard at length, in a rediscovered 1971 interview for Australian radio, accompanied by home movie footage of him as a child.

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Their generation’s standard memories of discovering rock, blues and skiffle in the 50s and 60s are illustrated by great clips – Bo Diddley, the Johnny Burnette Trio, Sonny Boy Williamson, about whom Plant tells a deliciously self-mocking anecdote. But it’s the personal confidences that stand out – including what amounts to a running joke about Plant’s long-term association with Bonham in various bands, with the drummer’s wife constantly pleading with him not to be led astray by the singer. A rich vein of anecdotes is found in Page and Jones’s busy history as session players, with Jones particularly emerging as an affable raconteur with a juicy portfolio of anecdotes.

Led Zeppelin itself gradually looms into view once Page tours America with the Yardbirds and moves them into a psychedelic mode – after which he starts building a new band, with Plant in the seat tentatively earmarked for Terry Reid. There’s not much grit about the ’60s-’70s music scene, however, and when it comes to notorious manager Peter Grant, we only get to hear how absolutely he believed in the band.

The Zeppelin content, though, including much rare and unseen performance footage, is nothing if not intense. Early band performances seen here include “How Many More Times“, with Plant letting rip on a Scandinavian TV show, and a ferocious 1968 Roundhouse date which had children in the audience sticking fingers in their ears in manifest alarm. They probably remember the trauma, or the thrill, to this day.

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Fans can buy €100,000 of NFTs and have dinner in Moscow with Rammstein’s Till Lindemann

Till Lindemann is one of the latest musicians to enter the world of Non-Fungible Tokens (NFTs) by selling VIP-style access to him along with special digital artwork.

  • READ MORE: WTF is an NFT? Kings Of Leon’s weird non-fungible token thing – explained!

The German singer, who as well as fronting Rammstein performs solo under his name, is offering fans the chance to dine with him in Moscow, Russia as part of a €100,000 (£84,705) NFT package.

His NFTs range from a short animated clip featuring Lindemann pictured at the State Hermitage Museum in Saint Petersburg, Russia to an unreleased one-shot music video of an orchestral version of Lindemann’s ‘Любимый город’ [Beloved Town] shot at the same museum.

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As LouderSound notes, the one-shot music video could well be paying homage to Alexander Sokurov’s historical fantasy Russian Ark (2002), a one-shot, 96-minute movie filmed at the Hermitage.

The director of Lindemann’s ‘Beloved Town’, Serghey Grey, uploaded an edited one-minute clip to his Facebook page in May should fans wish to get a glimpse of the work without shelling out a more than considerable amount of money.

Till Lindemann / Rammstein live in Rome in 2013. CREDIT: Simone Cecchetti/Corbis via Getty Images

Fans eager to meet Lindemann and own his exclusive art pieces need to be quick; only 10 of these collectibles packages exist, each priced at €100,000. They are produced in partnership digital brokers twelve x twelve.

The news follows Lindemann releasing ‘Ich Hasse Kinder’ on CD digi-pack and 7-inch red vinyl last month, replete with both AlterBoyz and Ship Her Son remixes of the song. In June, Lindemann shared the gory music video for the track – see here.

Meanwhile, Rammstein have announced details of their first ever North American stadium tour.

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The tour will begin in late August 2022 with a show at the Parc Jean-Drapeau in Montreal, Canada. Gigs in Chicago, Los Angeles, Chicago and more will follow across late summer, before the tour wraps up with three Mexico City shows in October.

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Fleetwood Mac’s Christine McVie sells song rights to Hipgnosis

Fleetwood Mac‘s Christine McVie, who wrote iconic hits such as “Little Lies” and “Don’t Stop”, has become the latest artist to sell her back catalogue of hits to Hipgnosis.

  • ORDER NOW: The Beatles are on the cover of the September 2021 issue of Uncut
  • READ MORE: Fleetwood Mac’s Christine McVie on Peter Green: “Every guitar player adores him”

The singer-songwriter sold the copyright of 115 songs to the London firm for an undisclosed fee, which gives investors the chance to take advantage of royalties from a selection of classic hits.

Merck Mercuriadis, the founder and chief executive of Hipgnosis, said: “In the last 46 years the band have had three distinct writers and vocalists but Christine’s importance is amply demonstrated by the fact that eight of the 16 songs on the band’s Greatest Hits albums are from Christine.”

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Mercuriadis, the former manager of Beyoncé and Elton John, obtained the catalogue of McVie‘s former bandmate Lindsey Buckingham in January. It included 161 songs including “Go Your Own Way”.

“I am so excited to belong to the Hipgnosis family, and thrilled that you all regard my songs worthy of merit,” said McVie.

Christine McVie, Stevie Nicks, and Mick Fleetwood of Fleetwood Mac
Christine McVie, Stevie Nicks, and Mick Fleetwood of Fleetwood Mac perform onstage during the 2018 iHeartRadio Music Festival at T-Mobile Arena on September 21, 2018 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Credit: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for iHeartMedia

Hipgnosis, which has spent more than $2billion (£1.4billion) buying the rights to hits from iconic artists such as Neil Young, said it now owns the rights to 48 of 68 tracks on Fleetwood Mac’s most successful albums.

The investment company also made waves after purchasing the catalogues of artists including Blondie and half of Neil Young’s songs in a deal thought to be worth an estimated $150million (£110million).

Shakira also sold all 145 of her songs including “Hips Don’t Lie”, “She Wolf” and “Whenever, Wherever”, all part of the deal.

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Earlier this year Mercuriadis said that cultural importance is key when it comes to the artists whose back catalogues they have acquired.

“So, with over £1bn invested, we only own 57,000 songs. But 10,000 of them are Top 10 songs, almost 3,000 of them are No.1 songs. So it’s a very small catalogue, relative to Universal, Warner or Sony. But the ratio of success within that catalogue is very high, there are very few songs that are not successes.”

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Crowd goes wild for Yungblud as he kicks off UK tour

Yungblud kicked off his UK tour at Rock City in Nottingham last night (August 6) – you can see footage from the show below.

  • READ MORE: Yungblud: “I wanted to write my ‘Urban Hymns’ or ‘Back To Black’”

The gig was the first of the singer’s (real name Dominic Harrison) ‘Occupy The UK’ tour, which was rescheduled earlier this year, and comes two weeks after the UK dropped all its coronavirus restrictions.

Taking to Twitter this afternoon to share some footage of a mass mosh pit from the first of his two nights at Rock City, an excited Yungblud wrote: “we’re fookin back!!!”

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More footage from the gig, which had COVID entry requirements in place, has surfaced on YouTube. See some of the clips and the show’s setlist below.

‘Occupy The UK’ setlist – Rock City, Nottingham, August 6, 2021

‘Strawberry Lipstick’
‘Parents’
‘I Love You, Will You Marry Me’
‘Anarchist’
‘mars’
‘Weird!’
‘Fleabag’
‘Loner’
‘Ice Cream Man’
‘Casual Sabotage’
‘love song’
‘I Think I’m OKAY’ (Machine Gun Kelly cover)
‘god save me, but don’t drown me out’
‘the freak show’

Encore:
‘Machine Gun (F**k the NRA)’

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The singer will head out on another tour, dubbed the ‘Life On Mars’ tour, later this year, beginning in Brighton at the end of September.

See Yungblud’s full list of upcoming tour dates below:

‘OCCUPY THE UK’ TOUR

AUGUST 2021

7 – Nottingham, Rock City
9 – London, Kentish Town Forum
10 – London, Kentish Town Forum
12 – London, Kentish Town Forum
13 – London, Kentish Town Forum
14 – London, Kentish Town Forum

DECEMBER 2021

7 – Glasgow, Barrowlands
8 – Glasgow, Barrowlands

‘LIFE ON MARS’ TOUR

SEPTEMBER 2021

27 – Brighton
28 – Bournemouth
29 – Plymouth

OCTOBER 2021

1 – London
2 – Portsmouth
4 – Bristol
5 – Bristol
7 – Manchester
8 – Manchester
9 – Doncaster
11 – Edinburgh
12 – Newcastle
14 – Birmingham
15 – Birmingham
16 – Leeds
18 – Liverpool
19 – Liverpool

APRIL 2022

30 – Lisbon

MAY 2022

3 – Barcelona
5 – Paris
6 – Paris
8 – Esch-sur-Alzette
9 – Berlin
10 – Warsaw
12 – Hamburg
13 – Brussels
14 – Amsterdam
16 – Munich
18 – Milan
19 – Zurich
21 – Vienna
24 – Moscow
25 – St Petersburg
26 – Helsinki
28 – Stockholm
29 – Oslo
30 – Copenhagen

JUNE 2022

1 – Prague
2 – Prague
4 – Cologne
10 – Dublin

Yungblud released his second album ‘Weird!’ last December.

Crowdfunder launched for new Keith Flint mural in London

A mural of late Prodigy frontman Keith Flint is set to appear in London to mark World Suicide Prevention Day (September 10).

The artwork is being created by music and mental wellbeing festival Headstock, who enlisted street artist Akse P19 to paint the piece. It will be located at Beechwood Road in Hackney, near to where The Prodigy played their first gig at the Four Aces Club in 1990.

  • READ MORE: Keith Flint, 1969-2019: the twisted face of rave, the beating heart of The Prodigy  

A Crowdfunder page has been set up to fund the mural, with organisers aiming to raise £12,500 in donations from fans. At the time of writing, £405 has been raised (the page closes on August 31).

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“The purpose of the mural is to raise awareness of mental health text message support service, Shout 85258, and the charity’s logo and text support number will feature prominently on the artwork,” a statement reads.

“The mural will be created to coincide with World Suicide Prevention day on 10 September 2021 – a date that falls just a week before what would have been Keith’s 52nd birthday.”

The Prodigy’s Keith Flint. CREDIT: Getty

The message goes on to explain that the funds raised will go towards “the artist’s time, materials, travel, accommodation and support crew, and will also help us cover hard costs such as scissor lift hire, Public Liability Insurance, Pavement Licence and Heath & Safety management.”

Keith Flint died on March 4, 2019 at the age of 49. It was subsequently confirmed that he had taken his own life.

Headstock previously collaborated with Akse P19 on a mural of Ian Curtis, which was unveiled by the late singer’s former Joy Division bandmate Peter Hook to mark World Mental Health Day 2020.

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Last month, the Manchester-based artist restored his mural of footballer Marcus Rashford after it was defaced following England’s loss in the Euros 2020 final (via BBC).

Back in March, the surviving members of The Prodigy marked the second anniversary of Keith Flint’s death. “It’s been 2 years. We miss you so so much brother, Your light burns bright, Your energy will never fade, Keep it real Keep it punk rock We live forever! LH & MAXIM,” they wrote.

For help and advice on mental health:

  • ‘Am I depressed?‘ – Help and advice on mental health and what to do next
  • Help Musicians UK – Around the clock mental health support and advice for musicians
  • Music Support Org – Help and support for musicians struggling with alcoholism, addiction, or mental health issues
  • YOUNG MINDS – The voice for young people’s health and wellbeing
  • CALM – The Campaign Against Living Miserably for young men
  • Time To Change – Let’s end mental health discrimination
  • The Samaritans – Confidential support 24 hours a day
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The Princess Diaries Soundtrack Captured Teen Pop’s Golden Age

By Yasmine Shemesh

A couple years ago, after a cozy movie night at home, the former teen pop singer Myra’s daughter grabbed her mother’s hands. They had just finished watching The Princess Diaries, which ends with Myra’s glittering 2001 single, “Miracles Happen (When You Believe),” playing in a ballroom as protagonist Amelia Mignonette Thermopolis Renaldi spins around in joy after formally accepting her role as princess of Genovia.

“Mom,” Myra’s daughter said, the singer recalled to MTV News. “Are you really going to go on the rest of your life not doing what you love?” The song’s themes of hope and perseverance had moved her to tell Myra, who had stepped away from performing years earlier to raise her child and go to college, to pursue her singing career again.

That’s the power of the film and, more specifically, its unforgettable soundtrack. Adapted from Meg Cabot’s novel of the same name, The Princess Diaries follows 15-year old Mia (portrayed to perfection by Anne Hathaway in her first film) as she discovers from her estranged grandmother, the regal Queen Clarisse Renaldi (Julie Andrews), that she’s the sole heir to the throne of a tiny, fictional European country. Also starring Mandy Moore, who plays mean-girl Lana, the film surveys individuality, self-esteem, responsibility, and the importance of believing in yourself at all costs.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lymt4it6Y_o

Released on August 3, 2001, it was one of the most beloved films of the year, launching Hathaway’s career and invigorating Andrews’s after semi-retirement. It was also Andrews’s first Disney showing since Mary Poppins in 1964. With the involvement of musical royalty like Andrews and producer Whitney Houston — and also Moore, then a major pop star — sonic fairy dust was sprinkled on the project from the start. But The Princess Diaries’s exceptional soundtrack stood out as something special, a time capsule featuring Backstreet Boys, Aaron Carter, Hanson, Nobody’s Angel, and B*Witched that tapped into a specific cultural moment when teen pop ruled. The compilation became a solid summer staple in heavy Discman rotation and reached No. 5 on Billboard’s U.S. Top Soundtracks chart.

“I have a gold record in my guest room,” producer Debra Martin Chase says, smiling through the telephone.

The impact is felt immediately with “Supergirl!,” a funky, piano-driven banger by Krystal Peterson (née Harris) that opens the film with soulful vigor. “I’m supergirl and I’m here to save the world,” Peterson sings. “But I wanna know, who’s gonna save me?” It’s an indelible introduction to down-to-earth, good-hearted, environmentally conscious Mia, who is so painfully shy when the audience first meets her that she throws up at the prospect of public speaking.

“I just remember thinking, Well, that's perfect,” Peterson tells MTV News. “You start to see her energy right off the bat in that movie, and I really appreciate the thoughtfulness. That's a great representation of the song, and it just works so well with the movie.”

Placement credit goes to music supervisor Dawn Solér, who has it written in her television contract that she gets to be music supervisor for any future Princess Diaries installments (“There’s rumor of a Princess Diaries 3,” she teases). “At that point, when we meet [Mia], she wasn't really a supergirl,” Solér says. “But [the song is] foreshadowing that she would be.”

Peterson remembers writing “Supergirl!” in her late teens, pulling the lyrics out of the journal she carried around to capture her feelings. It was one of the first songs she wrote that way. “It was a vulnerable song for me to write,” she says. “That song was thinking about the things that I was dreaming about freeing myself from at that age, even in the emotional realm. You might think too much about what other people need from you all the time. You might be trying to forge your own path and create a space of freedom for yourself.”

Ron Galella, Ltd./Ron Galella Collection via Getty Images

Krystal Peterson, then Harris, at The Princess Diaries premiere in 2001

Mia recoils in horror at the news of her royal status by telling her grandmother that her expectation in life is to be invisible, and those feelings stem from what most are unsure of during that formative time in youth: themselves. Mia is challenged to embrace her identity, face her responsibilities, and build a sense of confidence. And though she does change physically, Mia’s emotional transformation is the true heart of the story.

The Princess Diaries, to me, was all about empowerment,” Chase says. “The movie, at its essence, is about this seemingly ordinary young girl faced with extraordinary circumstances, who finds the courage and strength within herself to rise to the occasion and conquer all. And so, the music is really important in terms of just enhancing that message of believing in yourself.”

Chase had recently come off executive producing Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Cinderella with Houston when she received The Princess Diaries manuscript. “At the time, the general wisdom in Hollywood was that you could make a movie for boys and girls would go, but you couldn't make a successful movie for girls,” she notes. But in 1998, Disney had struck gold with The Parent Trap remake starring Lindsay Lohan. The studio looked to do something beyond branded films like Mr. Magoo, and without much else in the development pipeline, they fast-tracked The Princess Diaries and completed it within the course of a year. Chase’s partnership with Disney made her the first Black woman to have a production deal at a major studio.

Courtesy Debra Martin Chase

Star Anna Hathaway with producer Debra Martin Chase

Meanwhile, music supervisor Solér had previously assembled the iconic soundtrack for the coming-of-age drama Now and Then, though her first of many films with director Garry Marshall came with some interesting conversations. “Garry was skeptical because he had worked with a couple of music supervisors prior,” Solér says over Zoom, speaking from her home in Thousand Oaks, California. “I'd say, ‘Oh, let's put some music here.’ And he'd be like, 'Dawn! When the actors are doing their job, no music!’ So, I watched all his previous movies, and the thing that I realized about him, when there was music, it was very, very intentional.”

The soundtrack was crucial to Marshall. The Princess Diaries was shown almost weekly to Girl Scouts and youth groups, which was an important step to see how the music resonated. “We would sit at the back of the theater and watch the audience and the movement of them and the feel,” Solér remembers. She pulled inspiration from a few things: “Thinking about Mia in San Francisco, being sort of a geek,” as well as what kind of music was popular with teens at the time.

Even though the original soundtrack is packed with great pop music, its power is in the sharp curation of the songs and subtlety of the placement, which collectively work to highlight Mia’s emotional touchstones, as well as the ebbs and flows of her journey. Take Hanson’s “Wake Up.” It’s the morning after Mia learns she’s a princess, and the camera flashes to her getting ready for school in the morning, slightly disheveled, cocking her eyebrows in her bedroom mirror. With the breezy guitar riff playing quietly in the background, the audience peeks in on a private moment. “We always approached the songs as if [the movie] was a musical, so that it would be the narrative in a person's head, which would make sense in the storyline,” Solér explains. “To me, I think that's what makes the best song use.”

Lyrics to “The Journey” by Mpulz, “You'll get your wings at the right time, even birds must learn how to fly,” follow Mia as she sprints, stomach turning, out of debate class. “Little Bitty Pretty One,” Aaron Carter’s sweet cover of Bobby Day’s ‘50s classic, plays as Mia frantically yanks on her pantyhose in the backseat of a limousine on her way to etiquette lessons. Nobody’s Angel, Tammy Phoenix, and Lil J’s rendition of Salt-N-Pepa’s “Ain’t Nuthin’ But a She Thing” blasts as grandmother and granddaughter cruise over the Golden Gate Bridge during an outing that bonds them. “Crush” by 3G’s provides a dreamy backing for a slow dance between Mia and her longtime crush, popular Josh Bryant (Erik Von Detten).

Meanwhile, Robert Schwartzman, frontman for Rooney, handles the role of Michael Moscovitz, the brother of Mia’s best friend, Lilly (Heather Matarazzo); former Rooney members Taylor Locke and Ned Brower also briefly appear as Michael's band Flypaper. They perform “Blueside,” which would open Rooney’s 2003 self-titled studio debut. Another standout is “What Makes You Different (Makes You Beautiful)“ by Backstreet Boys, which scores the aftermath of the beach party. There’s a lot going on in that scene, including Moore’s iconic performance of “Stupid Cupid” and Mia’s eventual humiliation in front of eager paparazzi. As BSB’s ballad plays, a foil to the pep of “Stupid Cupid” earlier, its message serves as external reassurance that Mia doesn’t need to try to be someone she’s not to be cool or popular. Her power is within.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5SQvy9EORRM

Moore recorded “Stupid Cupid,” the film’s second ‘50s pop cover, especially for The Princess Diaries at Marshall’s suggestion. “When I talk about the things I learned from Garry Marshall, it was how to build the movie out: how to take moments in the script, flesh it out, elevate it, make it fun, and find ways to make it really pop,” Chase says. “This beach party was not originally scripted to have this musical number. But he saw an opportunity.”

Solér says there weren’t really any label requirements from Disney to include artists from their in-house roster. That allowed Peterson, who cut her teeth as a young session singer in Indianapolis and had recently signed to Backstreet Boys’s K-BAHN label, to land a key spot on the soundtrack. Shortly after moving to Los Angeles and starting to record her debut, Me & My Piano, “Supergirl!” was placed in the film. Peterson says being associated with BSB definitely helped open the doors to Disney. The boy band offered Peterson an opening slot on their international Black & Blue tour — “Quite kind of them, really” — to help promote her record. “As the song became more popular, I would get up onstage and notice people were singing along with me,” Peterson says. “And that was the biggest impact to me, to be able to really experience that togetherness with people.”

One artist directly connected to Disney was Myra, the first teen signed to Walt Disney Records, before Hilary Duff, Miley Cyrus, Demi Lovato, and Selena Gomez. “I’m Hispanic,” Solér adds. “Trying to find opportunities for Hispanic women has been something that has always been important to me, because I think it's a very, very underserved market.”

After making a name for herself singing Mariachi around Sonoma County, Myra signed to Disney and released her first single, “Magic Carpet Ride,” on the La Vida Mickey compilation. Shortly after, “Dancing in the Street” was featured in Recess: School’s Out. “It was so cool to see how it all came about,” she says. “And a lot of work. I had a great team. I actually still have a few friends up at Disney Records, and it's so nice to be in touch after all these years. There are good things about the industry.”

When she heard “Miracles Happen (When You Believe)” — written by Pam Sheyne and Eliot Kennedy, songwriters behind hits for S Club 7, Spice Girls, and Christina Aguilera — it resonated immediately. “I always wanted to do something to touch lives and touch hearts and make a difference, and that song was just up my alley completely,” Myra says.

The song was nominated for an American Latino Media Arts (ALMA) Award for Outstanding Song in a Motion Picture Soundtrack and was promoted as the theme song of The Princess Diaries. “Supergirl!” became an unofficial theme for the film, too, and its music video features Anne Hathaway serving burgers with Peterson in a diner dubbed the Super Girl Grill.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8E0sawMArmI

“It really didn't even feel like work,” Peterson says of the diner scene. “It just felt like joy.” Backstreet Boys Kevin Richardson and Howie Dorough have sneaky cameos, too. “It's one thing to have artists support you, it's another thing to have them show up in your video. It was a really, really thoughtful thing for them to do for me.”

One of the biggest highlights that day was meeting Houston, who dropped by the set. “She put her arm around me and was just such an encourager. I was feeling insecure around that time, probably for one of the first times in my life, as a singer or an artist. She was like, ‘This is great, you sound great.’ And I was like, ‘OK! Whitney says I'm all right, so I'm fine!”

Pop music has always made a defining impact on youth culture, but at the turn of the new millennium, teen pop’s boom made it more prevalent than ever. “It was all about romance and love and feeling good about yourself,” describes Chase, who also produced The Cheetah Girls, the Disney Channel’s first musical, in 2003. “It was upbeat. It was positive. There was an innocence and a freshness to it.” Myra, too, associates teen pop with an all-around wholesomeness: “Everything down from the clothing to the style to the lyric to the music to how you presented yourself.”

Right on the cusp of Napster and ascendent MP3 downloads, the teenage listening experience was still largely curated by select radio stations (like Radio Disney, which catered to its young audience), labels, and magazines. Today’s sweeping accessibility thanks to streaming services actually obscures how teen pop is defined. “If you look at teens today, because they have unlimited access, I don't think teen pop has a chance because teens are listening to everything,” Solér says. “My [16-year-old] daughter rarely listens to what you'd classify as teen pop. But she loves Backstreet Boys; she loves the throwback music because she has access. And kids are very curious and they want to discover.”

Courtesy Dawn Solér

Music supervisor Dawn Solér with star Julie Andrews

For Peterson, the pop-music world didn’t feel authentic to who she wanted to be as an artist. She eventually found herself toeing the line between what she hoped to create and what was happening in the business of her music. “I think a lot of the kids that were in the industry at that time were wrestling with that, actually,” she adds. It’s a sentiment echoed by Jessica Simpson in her memoir, Open Book, which candidly details the pressures and demands female pop stars often faced in the industry, and Hanson, who, as documented in their 2005 film Strong Enough To Break, also left a major label to make music independently on their own terms.

In the end, Peterson chose to walk away from Hollywood. She dealt with an “existential crisis” about singing — “Why all of a sudden do I love and hate something that has been such an amazing, magical gift?” — but took a long break and eventually started attending local live shows and giving voice lessons. Today, she lives in Cincinnati and performs with the Queen City Band, a jazz sextet, and as a solo artist. She has a new single, “Abundantly,” and, as she turns 40, she’s more excited than ever about the music she’s making. “Teaching helped me heal, also, because I realized again that music has power,” she says. “And I did learn how to save me, for what it's worth,” Peterson adds, referencing the lyrics to “Supergirl!”

The Princess Diaries is among a handful of movies from the early aughts — like Legally Blonde, Josie and the Pussycats, Coyote Ugly, and Blue Crush — that challenged the cultural climate by bridging buoyancy with a depth that champions female empowerment. “It's a perennial now,” Solér says. “Having a daughter and, for who I am, the most important thing is female empowerment. And it starts really young. It has to start really young because of the pressures of society and just the pressures that we have every day. So, I think that Princess Diaries is absolutely a piece that you can watch anytime and feel that.”

“The fact that 20 years later the film still resonates, it's still beloved, it's important to people, means a lot,” Chase says. “It holds up, and that's a big deal.”

Like watching the movie, listening to the soundtrack never fails to make you feel good about yourself. Myra still gets messages from fans about how “Miracles Happen (When You Believe)” has helped them get through everything from chemotherapy to grieving the loss of a loved one. Those interactions have made her incredibly proud of the song and deepened her own connection to it. And that’s also why, for Myra, Peterson’s “Supergirl!” has always stayed with her.

“I can't forget it, because those are moments and songs that really impacted my life as a young teen,” she says. “Any song that has to do with women empowerment, I love, I learn, and I never forget.”

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Yungblud shares COVID entry requirements for ‘Occupy The UK’ tour

Yungblud has shared an update on what entry requirements will be required for his upcoming ‘Occupy The UK’ tour as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.

  • READ MORE: Yungblud: “I wanted to write my ‘Urban Hymns’ or ‘Back To Black’”

The singer (real name Dominic Harrison) is set to begin the run of dates, which were rescheduled earlier this year, in Nottingham on August 6, two weeks after the UK dropped all its coronavirus restrictions.

Scotland will still have restrictions in place next month though, meaning Yungblud’s two Glasgow dates at the Barrowlands have been rescheduled to take place in December.

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Earlier this evening (July 27), the Doncaster rocker updated fans with information regarding entry into the shows on the tour, revealing that each date will offer free complimentary masks that are “fookin sick”.

“august tour news!!! ive waited for 18 months for this moment but as always safety and well-being is always my priority,” Yungblud said on Twitter. “these shows are gonna be fookin history, let’s do it right !!! you’re my blood and guts. i love you!!! are you fookin ready?!?”

One of the following criteria will be accepted in order to gain entry to the shows:

  • Proof of a negative NHS COVID-19 lateral flow test, taken within 24 hours of entry
  • Proof of full COVID-19 vaccination, both doses received at least 14 days before entry
  • Proof of natural immunity based upon a positive PCR test, taken within 180 days of the show (including 10-days self-isolation following the result)

The singer will head out on another tour, dubbed the ‘Life On Mars’ tour, later this year, beginning in Brighton at the end of September.

See Yungblud’s full list of upcoming tour dates below:

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‘OCCUPY THE UK’ TOUR

AUGUST 2021

6 – Nottingham, Rock City
7 – Nottingham, Rock City
9 – London, Kentish Town Forum
10 – London, Kentish Town Forum
12 – London, Kentish Town Forum
13 – London, Kentish Town Forum
14 – London, Kentish Town Forum

DECEMBER 2021

7 – Glasgow, Barrowlands
8 – Glasgow, Barrowlands

‘LIFE ON MARS’ TOUR

SEPTEMBER 2021

27 – Brighton
28 – Bournemouth
29 – Plymouth

OCTOBER 2021

1 – London
2 – Portsmouth
4 – Bristol
5 – Bristol
7 – Manchester
8 – Manchester
9 – Doncaster
11 – Edinburgh
12 – Newcastle
14 – Birmingham
15 – Birmingham
16 – Leeds
18 – Liverpool
19 – Liverpool

APRIL 2022

30 – Lisbon

MAY 2022

3 – Barcelona
5 – Paris
6 – Paris
8 – Esch-sur-Alzette
9 – Berlin
10 – Warsaw
12 – Hamburg
13 – Brussels
14 – Amsterdam
16 – Munich
18 – Milan
19 – Zurich
21 – Vienna
24 – Moscow
25 – St Petersburg
26 – Helsinki
28 – Stockholm
29 – Oslo
30 – Copenhagen

JUNE 2022

1 – Prague
2 – Prague
4 – Cologne
10 – Dublin

Yungblud released his second album ‘Weird!’ last December. Last month, he played a free, last-minute show in Los Angeles.

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Yungblud confirms his ‘Occupy The UK’ August tour dates will go ahead

Yungblud has confirmed that his ‘Occupy The UK’ August tour dates will go ahead as planned.

The singer is set to begin the run of dates, which were rescheduled earlier this year, in Nottingham on August 6, two weeks after the UK drops all its coronavirus restrictions.

Scotland will still have restrictions in place next month though, meaning Dominic Harrison’s two Glasgow dates at the Barrowlands have been rescheduled to take place in December.

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“i cannot wait to be in a room goin fookin mental with you so soon, so get fookin ready!” Yungblud wrote to fans. “however, unfortunately due to the ongoing COVID restrictions in Scotland, the Glasgow shows have had to be moved to the end of the year. i promise i did everything i could, i just want everyone to be as safe as possible.”

Another forthcoming UK tour of the singer’s, dubbed the ‘Life On Mars’ tour, are also set to go ahead later this year, beginning in Brighton at the end of September.

The following European run of dates has had to be rescheduled for 2022, though. “im so sorry i did everything i could, your safety is my top priority,” Yungblud wrote of the shows, while adding new dates in Belgium, Poland, Portugal and Finland.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by YUNGBLUD (@yungblud)

See Yungblud’s full list of upcoming tour dates below:

‘Occupy The UK’ tour

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AUGUST 2021

6 – Nottingham, Rock City
7 – Nottingham, Rock City
9 – London, Kentish Town Forum
10 – London, Kentish Town Forum
12 – London, Kentish Town Forum
13 – London, Kentish Town Forum
14 – London, Kentish Town Forum

DECEMBER 2021

7 – Glasgow, Barrowlands
8 – Glasgow, Barrowlands

‘Life On Mars’ tour

SEPTEMBER 2021

27 – Brighton
28 – Bournemouth
29 – Plymouth

OCTOBER 2021

1 – London
2 – Portsmouth
4 – Bristol
5 – Bristol
7 – Manchester
8 – Manchester
9 – Doncaster
11 – Edinburgh
12 – Newcastle
14 – Birmingham
15 – Birmingham
16 – Leeds
18 – Liverpool
19 – Liverpool

APRIL 2022

30 – Lisbon

MAY 2022

3 – Barcelona
5 – Paris
6 – Paris
8 – Esch-sur-Alzette
9 – Berlin
10 – Warsaw
12 – Hamburg
13 – Brussels
14 – Amsterdam
16 – Munich
18 – Milan
19 – Zurich
21 – Vienna
24 – Moscow
25 – St Petersburg
26 – Helsinki
28 – Stockholm
29 – Oslo
30 – Copenhagen

JUNE 2022

1 – Prague
2 – Prague
4 – Cologne
10 – Dublin

Yungblud released his second album ‘Weird!’ last December. Last month, he played a free, last-minute show in Los Angeles.

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Paul Stanley says KISS NFTs likely to arrive “in the foreseeable future”

KISS‘ Paul Stanley has revealed that the band are likely to release some NFTs (non-fungible tokens) “in the foreseeable future”.

  • READ MORE: WTF is an NFT? Kings Of Leon’s weird non-fungible token thing – explained!

Speaking in a new interview, the guitarist and co-lead singer discussed the prospect of KISS getting into world of NFTs and cryptocurrency.

“Well, we certainly are on the edge of the diving board into NFTs,” Stanley told SiriusXM’s Jim Norton and Sam Roberts. “That’s obviously a natural, and we’re flexing our muscles just before we dive in. But that’s in the foreseeable future.”

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He continued: “There’s so much cryptocurrency out there. NFT is almost an experience and possessing an experience. But cryptocurrency – there’s enough out there. And clearly there are a few that are much more important and seem to dictate the direction of crypto. So I don’t know we can be better at that than they are.”

You can watch Stanley’s interview with SiriusXM below:

Earlier this month, Gene Simmons spoke out about some of his former KISS bandmates, saying that “they continue to make really bad choices”.

Speaking in a recent interview, the bassist discussed the lack of involvement of Peter Criss and Ace Frehley in KISS’ new documentary Biography: KISStory.

“God love ’em, both Ace and Peter, in the beginning of the band, were just the best thing that ever happened to us,” Simmons said on Talking Wax With Adika Live! “But they made such horrible choices in their life. And they continue to do that – they continue to make really bad choices, not just in terms of their health and what you ingest, but career choices.

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He continued: “We just had this documentary that came out that’s a headlining thing at the Tribeca Film Festival, and, of course, without even thinking twice about it, we reached out to both Ace and Peter, ‘Hey, come and be part of this thing. You helped create the band. No question about it.’ And they refused.”

Simmons claimed that Frehley had a number of demands in order to participate in the documentary including editing rights. “God love him, that wasn’t gonna happen,” Simmons said. “I didn’t get those rights and didn’t want them; I just wanted to throw caution to the wind and get the thing done. So they barely appear in it.”

Meanwhile, Stanley has said that KISS could continue in the future without any of the original line-up.

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Uncut September 2021

CLICK TO GET THE NEW UNCUT DELIVERED TO YOUR DOOR

The Beatles, Lindsey Buckingham, Big Red Machine, Leon Bridges, Bruce Springsteen, Steve Gunn, Curtis Mayfield, Shannon And The Clams, Mercury Rev, The Sugarcubes, Ripley Johnson, The Beach Boys and The Lovin’ Spoonful all feature in the new Uncut, dated September 2021 and in UK shops from July 15 or available to buy online now. As always, the issue comes with a free CD, this time comprising 15 tracks of the month’s best new music.

THE BEATLES: Is it any wonder that The Beatles nearly named their seventh studio album after a magical invocation? After all, no other word captures the feats of creative alchemy that transpired on Revolver… Fifty-five years on, Uncut has assembled a crack team of Beatles heads – including Johnny Marr, Brian Wilson, Graham Nash, Roger McGuinn, Rickie Lee Jones, Sean Ono Lennon, Dhani Harrison, Steve Cropper, Margo Price and Wayne Coyne – to explore their favourite tracks from this, the Fabs’ finest body of work. Even Paul McCartney is on hand to tell Uncut about the origins of his experimental side.

OUR FREE CD! HEAVY ROTATION: 15 fantastic tracks from the cream of the month’s releases, including songs by Son Volt, Liam Kazar, Nathan Salsburg, Bnny, Shannon And The Clams, Suzie Ungerleider, The Scientists, Villagers and more.

This issue of Uncut is available to buy by clicking here – with FREE delivery to the UK and reduced delivery charges for the rest of the world.

Inside the issue, you’ll find:

LINDSEY BUCKINGHAM: There’s not much that can keep this singer-songwriter down. Not heart surgery, the pandemic or even his exit from Fleetwood Mac. As he resumes his solo career as one of rock’s most discreet musical radicals, Buckingham tells Uncut about false starts, his “crisp and dirty” new songs, the death of Peter Green and the ongoing soap opera around his alma mater. “Who knows, maybe the five of us will end up doing something…”

CURTIS MAYFIELD: He covered a vast amount of ground during the ’60s with The Impressions – but as a solo artist he went into overdrive. Bandmates and family tell Graeme Thomson about the soul superstar’s creative peak in the early ’70s – from pioneering anthems of empowerment to killer live sessions, a blaxploitation soundtrack and beyond…

BIG RED MACHINE: Deep in upstate New York, The National’s Aaron Dessner is masterminding the next phase of Big Red Machine – the musical collective he founded with Bon Iver’s Justin Vernon. Friends and contributors – including Fleet FoxesRobin Pecknold and Anaïs Mitchell– join Laura Barton to discuss community, collaboration and creative “mess”… Reveals Dessner, “We’ve never had a master plan!”

LEON BRIDGES: Blending avowedly ‘retro’ R&B with lo-fi garage grit, Leon Bridges became a Grammy-winning Texan success story. Back home in Fort Worth, he tells Stephen Deusner of the nocturnal LA sessions that birthed his third album Gold-Diggers Sound. “It’s hard to unlock a sexy vibe at 11am,” he reasons.

THE SUGARCUBES: It is 1987 and the Sugarcubes’ extraordinary debut single, “Birthday” is galloping up the charts. As the band put the finishing touches to their breakthrough album Life’s Too Good, Melody Maker’s Chris Roberts learns the Icelandic art of creation, and inspiration from Björk, Einar and their cohorts.

BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN: The Boss’ acclaimed autobiographical show makes an emotional return to Broadway.

MERCURY REV: From their base in the cosmic Catskills, Jonathan Donahue and Grasshopper recall rolling with Alan Vega, deafening Bob Dylan and a ruckus at the Royal Albert Hall.

THE LOVIN’ SPOONFUL: The making of “Summer In The City”.

RIPLEY JOHNSON: Album by album with the eccentric star.

STEVE GUNN: New album Other You is a beguiling and mercurial folk gem.

CLICK TO GET THE NEW UNCUT DELIVERED TO YOUR DOOR

In our expansive reviews section, we take a look at new records from Shannon And The Clams, David Crosby, Son Volt, Sault, Nathan Salsburg, Liars, Liam Kazar, and more, and archival releases from The Beach Boys, George Harrison, Aztec Camera, Christine Perfect, Jackie Leven and others. We catch Eliza and Martin Carthy and Black Country, New Road live; among the films, DVDs and TV programmes reviewed are Riders Of Justice, Summer Of Soul and Night Of The Kings; while in books there’s Baxter Dury and Genesis P-Orridge.

Our front section, meanwhile, features Bruce Springsteen, Karen Black, Edward Bell, and Juni Habel, while, at the end of the magazine, Martha Wainwright reveals the records that have soundtracked her life.

You can pick up a copy of Uncut in the usual places, where open. But otherwise, readers all over the world can order a copy from here.

CLICK TO GET THE NEW UNCUT DELIVERED TO YOUR DOOR

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Gene Simmons on former KISS bandmates: “They continue to make really bad choices”

Gene Simmons has spoken out about some of his former KISS bandmates, saying that “they continue to make really bad choices”.

Speaking in a new interview, the bassist and co-leader singer discussed the lack of involvement of Peter Criss and Ace Frehley in KISS’ new documentary Biography: KISStory.

“God love ’em, both Ace and Peter, in the beginning of the band, were just the best thing that ever happened to us,” Simmons said on Talking Wax With Adika Live! “But they made such horrible choices in their life. And they continue to do that – they continue to make really bad choices, not just in terms of their health and what you ingest, but career choices.

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He continued: “We just had this documentary that came out that’s a headlining thing at the Tribeca Film Festival, and, of course, without even thinking twice about it, we reached out to both Ace and Peter, ‘Hey, come and be part of this thing. You helped create the band. No question about it.’ And they refused.”

Simmons claimed that Frehley had a number of demands in order to participate in the documentary including editing rights. “God love him, that wasn’t gonna happen,” Simmons said. “I didn’t get those rights and didn’t want them; I just wanted to throw caution to the wind and get the thing done. So they barely appear in it.”

You can watch Simmons’ interview below:

Last September, Frehley confirmed during an appearance on SiriusXM’s Trunk Nation With Eddie Trunk that he had been approached by the producers of the KISS documentary and asked if he would take part.

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“They offered me a small fee to be involved with it, and I turned them down,” Frehley said. “I thought the fee was embarrassing, because I know how much money they’re gonna make on it. So, either share the wealth, or c’est la vie. So I decided not be involved. But they have plenty of old footage of me, and they’ll probably use that and get by. But it won’t be the same as if they get current footage.

He concluded: “Unfortunately, I decided the money that they offered me wasn’t anywhere near what I felt I deserved, so I turned it down. The footage you’re gonna see of me in this documentary is only gonna be old footage.”

Biography: KISStory premiered in the US late last month with a two-night event on A&E.

Meanwhile, KISS frontman Paul Stanley has said that the band could continue in the future without any of the original line-up.

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R.E.M. share original 1981 mix of ‘Radio Free Europe’, so we had a chat with their producer

R.E.M. are celebrating their 40th anniversary by reissuing the original version of their classic debut single ‘Radio Free Europe’ – the first time since 1981 that the single has been re-released. Check it out below along with our interview with producer Mitch Easter.

The song was re-recorded for R.E.M.’s 1983 debut album ‘Murmur’, but the band have said they prefer the faster original single version, which was released on small US indie label Hib-Tone Records and co-produced by Mitch Easter – who was also behind the desk for ‘Murmur’ and ‘Reckoning’.

“R.E.M. were already as band-y as it gets,” Easter told NME. “They were a unit you couldn’t penetrate. If one of them didn’t want to do something, it wouldn’t get done.”

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The reissued 7”, to be released on July 23, also features the original version of fellow ‘Murmur’ track ‘Sitting Still’. The same date sees a special cassette release, limited to 1,500 copies, of ‘Cassette Set’. Originally only 400 copies were made, which the band circulated to interested music industry people. Featuring cassette labels handwritten by frontman Michael Stipe, ‘Cassette Set’ comprises the 7” songs plus ‘White Tornado’, a snippet of an alternative “polka” version of ‘Sitting Still’ and an aborted version of ‘White Tornado’ featuring a mistake by guitarist Peter Buck.

NME asked Mitch for his memories of capturing R.E.M.’s first single – and whether he has any more unreleased treasures among his recordings by the band.

 

Hi Mitch. Does it feel like 40 years since you produced ‘Radio Free Europe’?

Mitch Easter: “In some ways, that session feels like it was the earliest days of electricity. In others, it’s like it was yesterday, because R.E.M. and that recording are always out there.”

How did you first hear about R.E.M.?

“I saw a poster for them at a club. It was very mysterious, with dark and abstract art by Michael. From the poster, my girlfriend and I were pretty sure they were an electronic band like Ultravox.”

When did you realise they were nothing like Ultravox?

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“When I first met them, the night before recording ‘Radio Free Europe’. They’d come to stay at my house, and I remember them walking up the sidewalk, thinking they looked like a proper rock band. Michael really looked like Mott The Hoople’s singer, Ian Hunter, with long hair and wearing sunglasses in the evening. I thought, ‘Woah, he’s cool!’ I only later found out Michael looked like that as he had an eye infection.”

What was the recording set-up like at your studio?

“My parents had just moved into a ranch house, with a garage at one end. It had been converted from a two-car garage into a one-car, with the other half a combined children’s bedroom and boiler storage. The band were on the car side, with their equipment stored in this space that looked like a kid’s bedroom. We put the amps and Bill [Berry]’s drums there to isolate them. I’m embarrassed anybody would come there to work, but they did and bless their hearts for doing so.”

Did such a basic set-up lead to much improvisation, working around the limitations?

“It was the days of the punk mentality, rejecting posh studios, and R.E.M. took pride in being efficient. We wanted to capture the moment and the energy, rather than trying 50 takes. I was already used to finding ways around things.”

That recording was the start of Michael’s distinctive vocal style, where his lyrics were hard to decipher. How deliberate was that?

“It’s funny how much is made of Michael’s pronunciation, as I didn’t think about it. I wasn’t thinking, ‘This guy sings weird, you can’t hear what he’s saying.’ I thought Michael was in the grand tradition of singing where listeners will get half the words wrong, but it sounds great, so who cares? There was just a good flow to the session, so it wasn’t discussed. There was no worrying about getting on the radio because people can’t hear what he’s saying, because the radio seemed a million miles away.”

R.E.M.'s Michael Stipe
R.E.M.’s Michael Stipe, shot by Jenn Five for NME in 2019

R.E.M. prefer your original Hib-Tone mix of ‘Radio Free Europe’ to the one on ‘Murmur’. Which is your favourite?

“My favourite would be an imaginary hybrid, with the tempo of the old version and the sonics of the ‘Murmur’ one. I didn’t know what I was doing to get a good enough sound on the original. It sounded cool, but it’s not as hi-fi as ‘Murmur’. The one on ‘Murmur’ is a little mellow and I wish it was faster, but some people prefer it and that’s OK.”

You co-produced ‘Murmur’ and ‘Reckoning’ with Don Dixon. Why didn’t he co-produce that Hib-Tone session?

“It didn’t occur to me ask Don. I’d just got my first studio and was getting used to recording bands. I’d known Don a decade, but he was much further along as a producer than me. By the time R.E.M. signed to IRS Records for ‘Murmur’, there was a demand they work in a fancier studio, which is when I asked Don for help. IRS wanted the band to work with other people. I don’t think they were keen on the demo for ‘Murmur’ Don and I made with the band, but we prevailed as R.E.M. liked it. They said: ‘No, this is what we’re doing’.”

How typical was that headstrong attitude?

“Oh, they had total respect for each other. Usually, there’s one leader in a band and someone who’s an underdog. It was nothing like that with them, they each had veto powers. It’s one reason for their longevity.”

You’ve also worked with Pavement, Suzanne Vega, The Hummingbirds… Do you ever tire of people focusing on R.E.M.?

“I love talking about R.E.M., as they’re splendid people. Some fans assume there was a rift when they made their third record, ‘Fables Of The Reconstruction’, without me and Don. If I’d been in their shoes, I’d have wanted to check other producers out too, just to see what it was like. At one point, there was a proposal to have me, Don and two other producers make what became ‘Fables…’ I said: ‘So each band member gets a producer? Thanks for including us, but you should check other things out.’ They seem OK about the records we made together and, as far as I’m concerned, everything is beautiful. I’ve kept in touch with them a fair bit. I started a project, playing Big Star’s album ‘Third’, and every one of the R.E.M. guys has participated at some point.”

Have you kept your own copies of the Hib-Tone single and ‘Cassette Set’?

“Yeah. I’ve got a few mysterious R.E.M. tapes too. There’s another tape from that first Hib-Tone session. They were good at editing their own material, so there were a lot of songs from back then that never really got used. I’ve got a tape with some of those unreleased songs. I have a version of ‘9-9’ where you can hear them work out the lyrics. They were confused by that song then, but the final version on ‘Murmur’ is confusing. That’s one of the wonderful things about ‘9-9’. I’ve got the studio patter from ‘Murmur’, which is pretty fun to listen to. I could never throw that stuff away.”

R.E.M.’s debut 1981 single, ‘Radio Free Europe’ and their tape ‘Cassette Set’ are set for their first-ever reissue on July 23, ahead of the band’s 40th anniversary celebrations

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Adele leads entertainment world reactions to England’s Euros victory over Denmark

Adele is one of many figures from the entertainment world celebrating the England football team’s latest Euro 2020 victory.

  • READ MORE: Why ‘Three Lions’ is still the ultimate football anthem

The singer took to Instagram after the game to share a clip of Harry Kane scoring the winning goal alongside the caption: “IT’S BLOODY COMING HOME” – her take on the famous refrain from ‘Three Lions’, the 1996 track by David Baddiel, Frank Skinner, and the Lightning Seeds.

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A post shared by Adele (@adele)

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Joining Adele in referencing the iconic track, which has become one of the country’s most enduring football anthems, were the likes of Dua Lipa, Liam Gallagher, Glass Animals, Keir Starmer, Michael Dapaah, and Sex And The City actor Kim Cattrall, the latter of whom wrote: “It’s coming closer to home.” You can see the posts below.

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England beat Denmark two goals to one at Wembley Stadium this evening (July 7) after extra time, sending them through to the final of the competition for the very first time.

Following the win, Stephen Fry said he was worried about the final on Sunday, tweeting: “Phew! The tenacious terriers outran and outfought the wonderful Great Danes. But now there’s Sunday to worry about… my poor old heart…”

Whereas rapper Not3s is already picking his outfit out for Sunday, revealing that he is “gonna wear a full kit down to the shin pads for the final”.

Other celebrities posting their reactions included Backstreet Boys‘ Kevin Richardson, Skin of Skunk Anansie, Martin Kemp, Greg Jame, KSI, and more.

The official account for Peaky Blinders also got in on the action once again, sharing a photograph of Arthur Shelby pouring a cocktail and tweeting: “Live scenes across England.”

Meanwhile, unheard rap segments from New Order‘s football anthem ‘World In Motion’ are going up for auction.

The track was first released to mark the 1990 World Cup in Italy, and features vocal contributions from that year’s England Football Team and memorable bars from striker John Barnes.

Ahead of tonight’s Euros semi-final clash, it was announced “three never before heard ‘World In Motion’ raps from Barnes, Gazza [Paul Gascoigne] and (you have to hear this) Peter Beardsley” will go under the hammer via Omega Auctions.

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Ed Sheeran on performing for England football team: “I don’t think there’s many moments that will top that”

Ed Sheeran has spoken about performing for the England football team last month, saying it will be a hard moment to beat.

The star headed to the national team’s St George’s Park HQ to give them a private performance in June.

  • READ MORE: NME Explains: How Baddiel, Skinner & The Lightning Seeds wrote ‘Three Lions (Football’s Coming Home)’

During an appearance on the BBC’s Crouchy’s Year-Late Euros, which was hosted by Peter Crouch, Sheeran said he had been invited along by England captain Harry Kane.

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According to the singer, the team barbecue that he attended saw him perform his own songs and deliver a DJ set, before holding a sing-a-long with the players of The Lightning Seeds and Baddiel & Skinner’s 1996 classic ‘Three Lions’.

Ed Sheeran
Ed Sheeran attends England’s Euro 2020 match against Germany at Wembley CREDIT: Eamonn McCormack – UEFA/UEFA via Getty Images

“At the end of the night, we’re in a circle, all hands around,” he said. “I mean for me, just as an English boy, being in the centre of the England team, it was really great.

“I’ve had amazing moments in my life, but I don’t think there’s many moments that will top that.” You can watch the programme in full on BBC iPlayer here.

Yesterday (July 3), England beat Ukraine four-nil in the quarter-finals. They will now face Denmark in the semi-finals on Wednesday (July 7). Italy and Spain will face off in the other semi-final match on Tuesday, while the final will be held at Wembley on July 11.

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Sheeran was among the stars to react to England’s victory yesterday, sharing a video in which he told his followers: “Guys, I don’t know if you’ve heard the news: it’s coming home.”

Meanwhile, the singer-songwriter recently announced that he will sponsor the shirts of his boyhood club, Ipswich Town.

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Paul Stanley says KISS could continue without him and Gene Simmons: “It’s bigger than any member”

KISS frontman Paul Stanley has said that the band could continue in the future without any of the original line-up.

The flamboyant rock icons launched their farewell ‘End Of The Road’ tour in 2019, which is now expected to finish up in late 2022.

While original members Stanley and Gene Simmons are still present and correct in the line-up, guitarist Tommy Thayer and drummer Eric Singer – the respective replacements for original members Ace Frehley and Peter Criss – now complete the quartet.

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Quizzed by Germany’s Radio Bob! on whether a new iteration of the band could emerge once he and Simmons have retired, Stanley replied: “I think that recasting KISS or KISS 2.0 is not what we have ever talked about. Can KISS continue and can it evolve without us in it? Well, yeah, because it’s already 50 per cent there.

“In other words, there was a time where people said, ‘Well, it can only be the original four.’ [And then] it was, ‘Well, it can only be the original three.’ Well, things move on and circumstances change.”

He added, per Blabbermouth: “Could I see KISS evolving with different personnel? Yeah.

“As big a fan as I am of what I do — and I think I’m damn good — there’s other people around who could pick up the torch and bring something to the philosophy and to the live show and to the music. It would be KISS. It wouldn’t be KISS 2.0.

“If it were to happen, yeah, it would be really just a continuation of the philosophy that we’ve always had, and that’s that KISS is bigger than any member.”

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In contrast, Ace Frehley previously said that the thought of KISS continuing without any of its original members was “the most ridiculous statement I’ve ever heard [Stanley and Simmons] make”.

He said: “They’re trying to rationalise to the fans, ‘Well, you know, we replaced Peter and we replaced Ace, and eventually we’re gonna replace ourselves. That’s like Mick Jagger saying, ‘Yeah, after me and Keith [Richards], die, The Rolling Stones will continue on with two other guys.’ I mean, it’s a joke.”

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Tenacious D’s Kyle Gass reworks Ramones classic ‘I Wanna Be Sedated’ into vaccination anthem

Tenacious D’s Kyle Gass has reworked Ramones record ‘I Wanna Be Sedated’ into a COVID vaccination anthem.

  • READ MORE: Quarantunes: a daily playlist of upbeat songs to help you through self-isolation

Changing the words of the punk classic to encourage people to get their vaccination jab, Gass sings: “Twenty, twenty, twenty-four hours from now/ I’m getting vaccinated/ Waited so long that I wrote down this song/ I’m getting vaccinated.”

The comedic musician has accompanied the spoof with a video that features cameos from Evanescence singer Amy Lee, Danko Jones, Toto’s Steve Lukather and many others.

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Gass’ Tenacious D bandmate Jack Black also makes an appearance dressed in doctor’s scrubs and holding a pair of giant needles. You can watch the video below.

Elsewhere, a Florida gig promoter has come up with a way of making sure that as many fans as possible attending an upcoming punk show have been vaccinated.

Paul Williams of Leadfoot Productions is putting on a gig at VFW Post #39 in St. Petersburg, Florida on June 26, featuring performances from Teenage Bottlerocket, MakeWar and Rutterkin.

In a bid to curb the spread of the coronavirus, Williams has instituted a price of $18 per ticket for those who have been fully vaccinated, and $999.99 for those who haven’t.

“We’re just trying to do a show safely,” Williams told WFTS. “And they should go out and get vaccinated to protect themselves and their families and their community.”

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Meanwhile, Jack Black delivered his own take on the ‘WAP’ dance challenge last year, showing off some serious commitment to the cause.

Dressed in a pair of Speedos, Black left very little to the imagination as he twerked for the camera while being doused with water in his own back garden.

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Scooter Braun is being sued for $50million by his former business partner

Scooter Braun is being sued for $50million by former business partner Peter Comisar, who claims the music executive deceived him into leaving a lucrative job.

Comisar, a former partner at Goldman Sachs, said in his lawsuit that Braun “aggressively courted” him from 2016 to 2017, persuading him to leave his job at investment banking company Guggenheim Securities by promising a major role at a new boutique investment firm with a salary of £3million.

According to the New York Post, Braun reportedly claimed that the new business Scope Capital Partners could raise between $500million and $700million from high-profile investors he described as “close friends”.

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They included Interscope Records and Beats co-founder Jimmy Iovine, Dreamworks founder David Geffen, who Braun reportedly described as his “Godfather,” the multi-billionaire Soros family and more.

Scooter Braun CREDIT: Michael Tran/Getty Images

The lawsuit said that “Braun, by all outward appearance, was the real deal,” but that he turned out to be a “sheep in wolves clothing” when it came to actually securing funding.

Comisar said that those investments never came about and is suing over a breach of contract, seeking $50million in compensatory damages plus unspecific punitive damages.

“Braun had to explain to Comisar, tail between his legs, how he had asked David Geffen, his supposed Godfather, to invest in Scope, only to be told by Geffen that he did not view Braun as someone with whom Geffen would invest,” the lawsuit said.

Braun, who is the manager for artists such as Ariana Grande, Justin Bieber, and Demi Lovato received “the same brush-off from Jimmy Iovine, Haim Saban and the Reuben Soros and Mittal families,” it continued.

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Elsewhere in his suit, Comisar claimed that Braun’s business partner David Bolno began courting him in 2016 by crediting Braun as “reigniting Calvin Klein underwear through a campaign with Justin Bieber and creating the Yeezy brand for Kanye West.”

Scooter Braun and Justin Bieber CREDIT: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images

In response, Braun has brought a petition to compel arbitration to the Superior Court for the State of California calling for “judicial intervention to end Peter Comisar’s unlawful, extortionate and opportunistic threats against him.”

Braun also tweeted: “One day I woke up to find out that a guy who took $5 million from us years ago with zero results has now read a headline of our success and has shown up out of the blue to ask for more money. Got to love a good opportunist. Unfortunately we don’t scare easy. Wish him well.”

In Comisar’s suit it is also alleged that Braun was dealing with private equity company Carlyle Group behind his back, seeking investment for his Ithaca Holdings in a deal that would allow him to make the same kind of investments he was planning to at Scope.

Comisar said that because the two operations were in “direct conflict” with each other, his contract was nullified, and that in 2018 Braun stopped paying his salary.

Elsewhere in the suit, Comisar said that Bolno told him that “Braun is an expert in the media and would destroy his reputation in a press and litigation process.”

He alleged that Braun and Bolno falsely accused him of racism as a “predicate for his removal”, and that they discussed a “smear campaign” in which they would say he was fired from Goldman Sachs.

It’s not the first time that Braun has been involved in controversy. In 2019, his then company Ithaca acquired the Big Machine Label Group, giving the company the rights to six of Taylor Swift’s albums.

The singer repeatedly voiced her displeasure to Braun’s control over her music, accusing him of “incessant manipulative bullying” and said that she was “sad and grossed out” when it emerged that Braun controlled her master records.

Braun later claimed that he had “no malicious intent” and “did everything aboard”.

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